Wimbledon

Novak Djokovic Makes Triumphant Return To Relevance With Surprise Wimbledon Title

by Randy Walker
@TennisPublisher

Novak Djokovic quieted critics and made a triumph return to the elite of professional tennis by winning his fourth Wimbledon title Sunday with a slightly dramatic 6-2, 6-2, 7-6(3) win over the mostly listless and exhausted Kevin Anderson of South Africa.

Djokovic’s 13th major title comes two years after his last major title – his historic win at the 2016 French Open which culminated him becoming only the third man in the history of tennis to hold all four majors simultaneously, joining Grand Slam winners Rod Laver and Don Budge.

However, since his triumph in Paris, Djokovic experienced a dramatic fall from the top, perhaps an expected human experience of needing of an exhale after years of pressure and drive to succeed and realize his goal of winning the French Open and win all four major titles.

“Then life came at him,” said Tom Rinaldi of ESPN of Djokovic’s fall from his pinnacle following the 2016 French Open.

“There were admitted challenges in his family life,” said Rinaldi of Djokovic. Also affecting him were injuries, a loss of motivation, a mix-up in his coaching team, separating himself with his coaches Boris Becker and Marian Vajda, an experiment with Andre Agassi as his coach and motivator.

“There were moment where I was doubtful of my return,” said Djokovic to ESPN.

His fall from the top reminded some observers of Mats Wilander of Sweden, who suddenly dropped off the top of the men’s game after he finally won the U.S. Open in 1988 to achieve the world No. 1 ranking and conclude his year by winning three of the four major singles titles.

While Djokovic was always seen as the player who would never give up and grind out amazing victories, like being match point down twice to Roger Federer at the U.S. Open, or in five hours, 53 minutes in the 2012 Australian Open final against Rafael Nadal, he then seemingly gave up competing in some matches, like against Dominic Theim in the quarterfinals of the 2017 French Open as the defending champion falling meekly 7-6, 6-3, 6-0, while also losing matches that he, as an all-time great, should not lose, such as to wild card Denis Istomin in the second round of the 2017 Australian Open and, most recently to Marco Cecchinato in the quarterfinals of Roland Garros last month. It was after that loss to Cecchinato that Djokovic even questioned if he had the will to even play at Wimbledon.

“I don’t know if I’m going to play on grass,” he said to reporters after the loss. “I don’t know what I’m going to do. I just came from the court. Sorry, guys, I can’t give you that answer. I cannot give you any answer.”

Djokovic found form in reaching the final of the pre-Wimbledon warm-up event at Queens, losing to Marin Cilic after having a match point. He quietly and deliberately reached the semifinals at the All England Club where he performed a master-class return to form in his 6-4, 3-6, 7-6, 3-6, 10-8. win over world No. 1 Rafael Nadal, played under the Wimbledon roof – and lights – due to the length of the titanic 26-24 fifth-set marathon between Anderson and John Isner in the first semifinal.

His win over Anderson was not in doubt until the latter stages of the third set. After winning the first two sets handily – Anderson having his serve broken in the opening game on a double-fault on break point – Djokovic had to endure five set points from Anderson before prevailing by closing out the third-set in a tiebreaker.

Djokovic, ranked No. 21, becomes the lowest ranked men’s champion at Wimbledon behind Goran Ivanisevic, who won the 2001 title with a ranking of No. 125. He also breaks the stranglehold that Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal have had on Grand Slam tennis, becoming the first player other than the Swiss and the Spaniard to win a men’s major since Stan Wawrinka at the 2016 US Open.

“Man, I went through some difficult moments,” Djokovic said to Rinaldi following the final of his long road back. “We all have ups and downs…Let life arrange things around you….This is a great confirmation that I am on the good road.”

Will It Be The Same Old Story In Wimbledon Men’s Singles In 2018?

Roger Federer or Rafael Nadal have won the last six major championships. Both are the overwhelming Wimbledon betting favorites for the men’s singles title – and who can argue?

No one.

Federer has won eight times at the All England Club and has played in a total of 11 singles finals. Nadal has won Wimbledon twice – most notably his 2008 final 10 years ago against Federer – and has played in five finals. However, he has not advanced past the fourth round at the event since 2011. With razor-thin margins separating the two players, could this lack of reserve confidence be the different between a point or two if these two were to meet in a climatic final and 10-year-anniversary reprise of their epic 2008 Wimbledon final classic? Federer appears to be as fine-tuned as he has ever been on the comfort of the Wimbledon grass. The only difference between this year and others is his new Uniqlo tennis attire.

While Federer and Nadal are the strong favorites to win the title, Brad Gilbert of ESPN said he believes that there are five real contenders. Outside of the maestros from Switzerland and Spain, others are Juan Martin del Potro, John Isner and Novak Djokovic.

Del Potro is the surprise pick to win the tournament from ESPN commentator and former U.S. Davis Cup captain Patrick McEnroe. The Argentine is a former semifinalist at this event in 2013 where he lost a tight five-setter to Djokovic. He also captured Olympic bronze at the All England Club at the 2012 Olympics, extending Federer to a 19-17 third set in a four-hour-26-minute epic semifinal before beating Djokovic for bronze. Perhaps most importantly, del Potro is not intimidated against Nadal or Federer.

Perhaps the only other real contender for the title is hard-serving John Isner. The former Univerity of Georgia standout is into the second week of Wimbledon for the first time in his career and other than Federer, Nadal and Djokovic, is perhaps the most famous Wimbledon player by virtue of his incredulous 11-hour, 70-68 win over Nico Mahut in the 2010 first round.

Isner is playing the best tennis of his career this year having won the biggest tournament of his career at the Miami Open in April. Like del Potro, Isner is not intimidated by playing the top players. Many – except Isner and his inner circle – may have forgotten that he nearly beat Federer on the Centre Court grass at the 2012 Olympics before falling 6-4, 7-6(5) in an incredibly close contest that is was much closer than the score indicated, with a missed sitter forehand and a let cord basically being the difference between the two players.’s

Djokovic is the unknown entity of men’s tennis. While he is regarded as one of the all-time greats with 12 major titles – including all four majors including Wimbledon in 2011, 2014 and 2015 – he has not won a major title since the French Open in 2016 and has struggled physically with injuries and mentally with concentration, off-court distractions and motivation. You can’t count him out of the conversation, but one could argue that of all the other contenders for the title, Djokovic may have the least amount of deep hunger for the title. There are glimpses of his past form and fire but it is not consistently there and among punters, will not receive a lot of attention in Wimbledon betting

What Can You Buy With Wimbledon Winnings?

In everything classy that the Wimbledon tournament exudes, one thing really stands out is the amount of player earnings. The Wimbledon tournament is one of the most rewarding sporting events in the world and the tournament has just gone one step further in 2017. Generally speaking, all the prize winnings have a 13% consecutive increase from the 2011 edition. All participants, including those from the first round players, all the way up to the winners, will take home a larger cheque in comparison to participants from previous years. As a player, no matter which stage you are eliminated from, you are guaranteed £8,000 more than the average UK salary per month.

We have already seen the first round of Wimbledon, where unsuccessful players join spectators to watch the tournament on live television to see who will reign as champion this year. Those who lost in the first round, may be excluded from the tournament, but bear in mind that they’ve walked away with £35,000 each. This is a huge increase from the £11,500 that first round participants pocketed in 2011. An amount of £35,000 is a cool sum of money and there is no doubt that such a package can easily net you a fancy apartment or home in an affluent medium density suburb in basically every country around the world.

Those who managed to reach the second, third or fourth rounds, have pocketed quite a substantial amount. The second round participants this year received £57, 000, third round players received £90, 000 and fourth round players were issued with a handsome £147, 000. Anyone who managed to reach the later rounds is equally capable of not only improving the quality of his or her own life, but such amounts of money can easily impact the lives of others too. As an example, the winnings can be used to further the player’s development for an entire year or the sponsor mat choose to acquire state of the art training equipment which can serve many players and hopefuls. Other more luxurious examples include investing in fixed property, buying a sports car, buying a few bitcoins or even spending a month’s worth of leisure time at a 5 star hotel.

Further to this, a quarter finalist at the 2017 tournament will be rewarded with a £275,000 in cash, while a semi finalist receives a whopping £550,000. Not only is the prize money more attractive, but it is at this stage of the tournament that hogs all the limelight and where all the prestige reigns. With such huge winnings in the quarter and semi finals, any player who manages to reach these stages will definitely live the glamorous life. When it comes to purchasing ideas with this type of cash, the top of the range gadgets and ridiculously expensive cars and houses come to mind. Expect many holiday selfies from Wimbledon semi finalists who have much more disposable income on hand.

Last, but definitely not the least, is the finalist earning category and of course, not to forget about the championship winnings. For the first time ever in tennis history, a single player is able to take home more than £2 million in one go! The prize money for this year’s winner stands at a massive £2.2 million, while the finalist will receive half thereof at a sum of £1.1 million. Expect both the finalist and winner to wine and dine with A-List celebrities. In addition to everything that the above are able to buy, the finalist and the winner may look at purchasing personalised yachts, top-end sports cars, private jets, luxury holiday homes and the list goes on.

This year’s prize monies at the Wimbledon tournament bear testimony to the tournaments’ class. The winnings simply reinforce how lucrative Wimbledon is when we measure what the cash prizes equal in physical and intangible products.

Imagine Having A Sitter Overhead To Win Wimbledon, Missing It, Then Losing!

by Randy Walker

@TennisPublisher

 

Wimbledon is a place where dreams come true, but also where nightmares occur as well.

On the most heart-breaking moments in Wimbledon history happened on July 6, 1935 when American Helen Jacobs lost the Wimbledon women’s singles final to Helen Wills Moody by missing a simple overhead smash on match point. Jacobs missed the easy shot when leading 5-3 in the final set, only to lose 6-3, 3-6, 7-5.

Wrote Bud Collins in his famous “Bud Collins History of Tennis” book of Jacobs and her mishap, “Jacobs took a winning 4-2 lead in the third, with one powerful serve knocking the racket from Moody’s hand. She then broke Moody’s serve to lead 5-2, but Moody broke back to 3-5 in a game where she was facing a match point at 40-30 and Moody flicked a desperation lob with Jacobs at the net. It looked like a simple smash, but a gusty wind caused the ball to sink so swiftly that Jacobs had to drop to her knees to hit it…into the net. That turned the match around. Jacobs went down fighting, serving two aces when trailing 5-6, but losing the match, 6-3, 3-6, 7-5. It was her fourth loss to Moody at Wimbledon, three in a final. Jacobs also lost to Moody in the 1928 U.S. final.”

There was redemption for Jacobs, however, as she goes on to win the title the following year – her only Wimbledon singles titles – defeating Hilde Krahwinkel  6-2, 4-6, 7-5 in the final.

In 1938, Jacobs and Wills Moody again play in the Wimbledon final, but Jacobs is again hit with bad luck, twisting her ankle at 4-4 in the first set and is not able to move well around the court and loses the next eight games. The second set lasted a mere eight minutes.

Will Novak Djokovic Get Back To His Best Or Will His Decline Continue?

Things have not been going well for Novak Djokovic and even changing coach to legendary tennis player Andre Agassi performances have declined. One of the lowest points of his career in recent year was the humiliating defeat against Dominic Thiem who he has won 12 matches against to one in previous meetings. Before the tournament started he was in most experts tennis predictions and tips to make the final. No one expected such a decline in his performance and it has led to many questions being asked about the player’s desire for competing.

The French Open is a competition that Djokovic normally dominates which made the loss to Thiem even more shocking. He started the match well but quickly declined and seems to give up which is not the player that once was. What got him to the top was his determination and ability when things got tough to raise his game. This seems to be missing from his game and unless he can find that fire it will quickly fall down the ATP tennis rankings.

One of the main problems with Djokovic is he is making too many unforced errors. This must be due to the mental side of the game and he needs to regain his focus if he wants to regain the throne of being the number one men’s tennis player.

Andy Murray rise to the top is down to his pure determination, he wants it more than Djokovic. The best players in the world find a way to get through matches when they are not playing at their best and Djokovic is struggling to do this.

Djokovic can still turn things around but if he is going to he will need to do it fast. The other players have stopped fearing the once unbeatable star and if his performance level does not improve he may as well call an end to his lustrous career. It will be better than putting in the type of humiliating performances that he did at the French Open and will protect his legacy in the sport.

When asked about his performances of late Djokovic sounds like a player that is ready to retire. Any player at the top of the game when they consider this should retire. It is impossible to be world number one with this type of mindset. Many pundits are making tennis predictions 2017 that this will be the last year that we see Djokovic play so let’s hope that he can put on a show for the fans and enjoy his last playing days.

It is amazing just how fast the decline of Djokovic has happened. It is going to be a tough task for to player to get back to his best but even slightly below his top-level, he is still with a chance of winning another Grand Slam. For the latest betting tips for tennis and news make sure you subscribe and leave a comment below on your thoughts on Novak Djokovic.

 

\

 

 

 

 

 

Taylor Fritz Still One of America’s Great Hopes

Taylor Fritz is one of the most promising tennis players that America has to offer, although he has endured a difficult period since his emergence on the ATP World Tour. His struggles continued on the grass of Stuttgart, with the young American failing to make it past the first qualifying round. Fritz has spent a few months away from the game, but on his return has lost in the first round of the Surbiton Challenger in addition to Stuttgart in matches which he entered as heavy favourite. The 19-year-old has time on his side, but he will be keen to prove that his breakout season in the sport was not an anomaly.

Fritz’s best career performance came in just his third ATP tournament, with his run in Memphis the first appearance in a final for eight years by an 18-year-old. He ultimately lost to Kei Nishikori, a mainstay of the top ten in the rankings, but Fritz’s youthful exuberance impressed the tennis world. Fritz consolidated this showing with a quarter-final run in Acapulco, eventually succumbing to compatriot Sam Querrey, and a slightly weaker end to the year could not take the shine of a remarkable season.

Fritz stormed to a career-high ranking of 53 as an 18-year-old, prompting inevitable assertions that he was the next great American hope and a future Grand Slam winner. Of course, few would have expected him to be challenging for those titles while still at a very young age, but the latest tennis odds of Fritz being 250/1 to win Wimbledon accurately reflect how his development has slightly stagnated. Incidentally, the leading American players that Fritz was expected to sit alongside sooner rather than later, Jack Sock and John Isner, are odds of 100/1 to triumph on the grass in London.

American Slam success, in the men’s game at least, does not appear to be on the immediate horizon. However, Jelena Ostapenko’s remarkable run to take the French Open singles title as an unseeded player highlights how a great couple of weeks can change everything. Fritz is a great couple of weeks away from shooting up the rankings. It was his adventures in Memphis that propelled him up the rankings, and it was never really expected that Fritz would consolidate all of those ranking points the following year. He made the last sixteen in 2017’s iteration of the tournament at Memphis, which is still a commendable showing.

Fritz’s success in Memphis and Acapulco, combined with his scope for growth, means that expectations are high of the young American. Pressure can be telling, with perhaps the relative grass-court experience of veteran Marco Chiudinelli the difference in Stuttgart between success and failure. However, the emergence of other young Americans will take the spotlight off Fritz, and this could be a constructive development in his progress.

Frances Tiafoe has soared up the rankings and has held his own against Roger Federer. The big-serving Reilly Opelka reached the quarter-finals of the grass-court challenger in Surbiton and his game should suit the green surface. Opelka looks on course to break the top 100 soon, where other young Americans Jared Donaldson and Ernesto Escobedo already reside with Tiafoe. The future is bright for American tennis, and Fritz will inevitably work his way back up the ranks. With such a deep source of talent for American fans to root for, Fritz should be able to play with less pressure and recapture the heights of 2016.

“Old School” Hollywood Meets “Old School” Tennis In “The Wimbledon Final That Never Was” Book

Incredible stories connected the Hollywood lives of such stars as Grace Kelly, Errol Flynn, Gary Cooper, Charlie Chaplin, Groucho Marx and others to the world of international tennis are featured in the writings of 1931 Wimbledon champion Sidney Wood in the new book “THE WIMBLEDON FINAL THAT NEVER WAS…AND OTHER TENNIS TALES FROM A BYGONE ERA.”

THE WIMBLEDON FINAL THAT NEVER WAS ($15.95, New Chapter Press, www.NewChapterMedia.com), which will be published June, 2011, details the life and times of Wood with a focus on one of the most unusual episodes ever in sport when he won the men’s singles title at Wimbledon in a default – the only time in the history of The Championships that the men’s singles final was not played. Wood, who passed away in 2009 at the age of 97, tells the story of how he won the title over Frank Shields, his school buddy, doubles partner, roommate and Davis Cup teammate – and the grandfather of actress and model Brooke Shields – when Shields was ordered by the U.S. Tennis Association to withdraw from the final to rest his injured knee in preparation for an upcoming Davis Cup match for the United States. He then discusses his “private understanding playoff” that saw his match with Shields at the Queen’s Club tournament final in London three years later be played for the Wimbledon trophy.

Wood, who could be called the greatest story teller tennis ever had, also relates fascinating anecdotes and stories that involve famous personalities from Hollywood and across the globe. Stories include his romance with Grace Kelly, his qualifying for the modern day US Open doubles championship with Errol Flynn, his on-court tennis joking with Charlie Chaplin and Groucho Marx among many others.

David Wood of Queens, N.Y., the youngest son of Wood, serves as contributor to the volume.

Founded in 1987, New Chapter Press is also the publisher of Tennis Made Easy by Kelly Gunterman, Roger Federer: Quest for Perfection by Rene Stauffer, The Bud Collins History of Tennis by Bud Collins, The Education of a Tennis Player by Rod Laver with Bud Collins, Acing Depression: A Tennis Champion’s Toughest Match by Cliff Richey and Hilaire Richey Kallendorf, Boycott: Stolen Dreams of the 1980 Moscow Olympic Games by Tom Caraccioli and Jerry Caraccioli (www.Boycott1980.com), The Lennon Prophecy by Joe Niezgoda  (www.TheLennonProphecy.com), Bone Appetit, Gourmet Cooking For Your Dog by Susan Anson among others.

Andy Murray Beats Milos Raonic In Straight Sets To Win Second Wimbledon Title

by Kevin Craig

@KCraig_Tennis

 

Andy Murray won his third major title on Sunday at Wimbledon as he defeated Milos Raonic in straightforward fashion, 6-4, 7-6(3), 7-6(2).

“This is obviously the most important tournament for me every year. I’m proud to have my hands on the trophy again,” said Murray, who shed tears of joy on the court after his win.

The title was Murray’s second at Wimbledon as he was able to give the home crowd their wish, just as he did in 2013, as well as at the 2012 Summer Olympics when he won the gold medal with the event being hosted at the All England Club.

“I’ve had some great moments here, but also some tough losses. The win feels extra special because of the tough losses,” said Murray.

It was a true master-class performance from Murray that earned him his third major title as he was simply able to negate Raonic’s weapons. While Raonic had been able to serve and hit powerful ground strokes through all of his opponents up to the final, Murray is a completely different match-up as his best assets are his return and defense, leaving the Canadian in a world of uncertainty on Centre Court.

“He moves incredibly well. He returns well. Those are his two biggest strengths,” said Raonic of Murray’s play. “Every time you play him, you know he’s going to get more returns back than anyone else.”

Both players looked confident from the onset as Murray, who hit just 12 unforced errors throughout the match, was able to breeze through his service games while Raonic dealt with some early nerves playing in his first major final, fighting off a break point in just his second service game of the match. Murray, though, quickly earned two more break points just a few games later and didn’t miss out again, capitalizing for a 4-3 lead. Two easy holds later and the Brit had taken the first set without facing a break point.

Raonic was again able to fight off a break point early in the second set, but he was still unable to make any inroads on the Murray serve. The Brit only lost more than one point in a service game in the second set twice and was never taken to deuce, allowing him to continuously pressure the Canadian’s biggest weapon, his serve. More break points came at 3-3 and 4-4, but once again Raonic fought those off and eventually forced a tiebreak, a point of the match in which he would have expected to excel.

That was far from the case, though, as Murray raced out to a 3-0 lead before leading 5-1 at the change of ends. The No. 2 seed didn’t look back before sealing the breaker 7-3, placing himself just one set away from more British glory.

Raonic’s level clearly rose in the third set as he was the one that didn’t get taken to deuce a single time. His only real chance in the set, though, came at 2-2 when he had a 15-40 lead on Murray’s serve. The Brit was able to reel off four points in a row from that moment to fight for the hold as Raonic missed out on the only two break points he had in the match, and it was only the second time that the Canadian even managed to take Murray to deuce.

While Raonic still dominated on serve throughout the set, Murray had essentially killed off any real threat from the first time major finalist. When the tiebreak arrived in the third set, it was Murray who, once again, raced out to a big lead of 5-0.

After falling in the final of the first two majors of 2016, there would be no denying Murray this time as he was able to close out the tiebreak at 7-2, earning him his third major title with a stellar performance in front of his home nation.

“Last time, I was so relieved. I felt so much stress and pressure and didn’t really get the chance to enjoy it as much,” said Murray. “So I’ll make sure I enjoy this one tonight, for sure.”

Serena Williams Ties Steffi Graf 22-Major Open-Era Record With Wimbledon Win

by Kevin Craig

@KCraig_Tennis

 

Serena Williams captured her 22nd major championship on Saturday as she was able to defend her Wimbledon title, beating Angelique Kerber in straight sets, 7-5, 6-3.

Williams, who has been the No. 1 player in the world for well over the past three years, had been attempting to tie Steffi Graf’s mark of 22 major titles since she won the Wimbledon title in 2015, but a semifinal appearance at the US Open followed by two runner-up performances delayed her efforts. Now that the American has grabbed No. 22, though, she currently sits just two major titles behind the record holder Margaret Court, who won 24 in her career.

“It’s been incredibly difficult not to think about it. I had a couple of tries this year…but it makes the victory even sweeter to know how hard I worked for it,” said Williams of her 22nd major title.

In a rematch of the 2016 Australian Open final in which Kerber won in three sets, the 34-year old Williams looked to be the one to get off to a fast start as she had three break chances in the second game of the match. The German, though, was able to fight each of those off, and actually looked like the more comfortable player on serve from that point on.

That quickly changed in the 12th game, though, as Kerber, the 28-year old who was playing in just her second major final, served to take the set into a tiebreak. Williams was able to crush a few returns when it mattered most, opening up a 15-40 lead which gave her a look at two set points. After missing out on the first, Williams, who hit 39 winners compared to Kerber’s 12, capitalized on the second with an un-returnable backhand to take the set.

The second set was completely dominated by the servers as there was only one break point in the first seven games. Williams, though, has always been able to turn her level of play up a notch or two when she needs to the most, and, just like in the first set, that is what she did in the second.

With Kerber serving at 3-4, Williams fought back from a 40-15 deficit and won four points in a row to break and set up an opportunity to serve for the title. Three unreturned serves later, Williams, who hit 13 aces, found herself at championship point.

A brief rally ensued before Williams was able to come to the net and put away an easy forehand volley for the win. Falling to the court in joy, the American had just placed herself in the record books again as she earned her seventh Wimbledon title.

“It’s an honor to play on Centre Court and a great feeling,” said Williams, who faced just one break point in the match. “This court definitely feels like home.”

SerenaWimbledon20166

Milos Raonic Has Best Mental Match In Wimbledon Semifinal Win Over Roger Federer

by Kevin Craig

@KCraig_Tennis

 

Milos Raonic earned a spot in his first major final as he pulled off an impressive comeback win on Friday over 17-time major champion Roger Federer, 6-3, 6-7(3), 4-6, 7-5, 6-3.

“It’s an incredible comeback for me…it’s a great feeling,” said Raonic, who became the first Canadian to reach a major singles final. “I showed a lot of emotion out there, always positive, and I think that’s what got me through. Mentally, I had one of my best matches in my history and my career.”

The Canadian, who tallied 75 winners in the match, including 23 aces, got off to a quick start against Federer, breaking the seven-time Wimbledon champ in just his second service game of the match for a 3-1 lead. A few more straightforward games on serve concluded the set and the No. 6 seed was able to take the first step forward to the final.

Each player impressed on serve in the second set as the majority of the games saw the returners struggling to win even just one point. In a crucial tenth game, though, Federer opened up a 0-40 lead on Raonic’s serve at 5-4, but the Canadian was up to the task and used his big serves and ground strokes to save those three set points, plus a fourth a few points later, displaying that he might actually be able to pull this off.

Federer, who hit just 14 unforced errors in the match, didn’t let the disappointment of missing out on those four set points, though, as the set went to a tiebreak. From 3-3, the Suisse was able to reel off four points in a row to level the match at one-set all, putting a minor dent in that confidence that Raonic had boosted up.

The former No. 1 player in the world kept his level up and looked to have taken complete control of the match in the third set as he was able to break Raonic in the latter stages for a 4-3 lead. Two holds at love for Federer closed out the set and allowed him to come within one set of his 11th Wimbledon final.

“I was struggling there through the third and fourth sets. He was playing some really good tennis,” said Raonic.

Federer, who beat Raonic in the 2014 Wimbledon semifinals, looked like he would pounce first in the fourth set, as well, as he had a look at two break chances at 2-2. Once again, though, the 6’5” Canadian was up to the task and saved both of them, plus one more in the 4-4 game. The confidence boost received from escaping those big moments allowed Raonic to bounce back from a 40-0 hole on Federer’s service game at 5-6, as he eventually won a 14-point game and converted his third break chance to steal the fourth set and force a decider.

The Canadian carried that momentum into the fifth set, breaking Federer in his second service game for a 3-1 lead, before having two more break chances in Federer’s next service game for a double break lead. He was unable to convert but he didn’t need that extra cushion as there was no way back for the Suisse. Raonic’s big serve, which reached speeds of 144mph and averaged 129mph on the day, proved to be too hot to handle for Federer as Raonic lost just five points on serve in the set, including a hold at love to seal the deal.

“I sort of persevered. I was sort of plugging away…He gave me a little opening towards the end of the fourth. I made the most of it,” said Raonic.

The Canadian now awaits the home favorite Andy Murray in the final after the Brit defeated Tomas Berdych comfortably in straights, 6-3, 6-3, 6-3. Raonic and Murray just played three weeks ago in the final at Queen’s Club with Murray winning, 6-7(5), 6-4, 6-3.

“Am I worried about recovering? No…my matches tend to be quite quick,” said Raonic. “I feel pretty good after. I know I’ll feel much better in 48 hours…It’s a slam final. A lot of adrenaline. All this kind of stuff takes over and you keep fighting through.”

“I’ve by no means done what I want to be here to do,” said Raonic, who hopes to become the first Canadian to win a major singles title. “The impact of being Canada’s first-ever finalist will be bigger if I can win the title. I have to focus on that, put all my energy into that.”