US Open

2018 US Open To Feature Electronic Line Calling On All Courts

The USTA announced that electronic line calling will be utilized on all tournament courts at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center for the first time at the 2018 US Open. In 2006, the US Open became the first Grand Slam event to use electronic line calling during play, featuring video replay in Arthur Ashe Stadium, and now the US Open will be the first Grand Slam to utilize electronic line calling on all match courts.

In 2018, all Men’s and Women’s Singles, Doubles and Mixed Doubles events will be scheduled to feature electronic line calling technology. Having the technology available on all tournament courts provides a level of consistency and fairness throughout the tournament.

“Having electronic line calling on all of our courts allows us to provide a level playing field for all competitors,” said David Brewer, US Open Tournament Director. “The US Open has a history of innovation, and by becoming the first Grand Slam to feature this technology on all courts, we are proud to carry-on that tradition.”

Since 2007, the US Open’s replay challenge system has been sponsored by Chase and is called the “Chase Review” in-venue and during the domestic broadcast of the US Open.

The four main stadium courts (Arthur Ashe Stadium, Louis Armstrong Stadium, Grandstand, Court 17) will house instant replay teams within each stadium. A centralized office housed inside the broadcast compound on the grounds of the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center will handle the electronic line calling for all other courts. In this office, each court will be given a dedicated two-man team, consisting of a Review Official and a Hawk-Eye technician.

The implementation of this technology was made possible by the Strategic Transformation of the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center, which will be completed this year, as it afforded the opportunity to install the necessary technology throughout the grounds, in a cost-efficient manner.

Last year seven courts showcased electronic line calling: Arthur Ashe Stadium, Louis Armstrong Stadium (temporary structure), Grandstand, Court 17, Court 5, Court 10 and Court 13.

This year’s tournament marks the 50th Anniversary of the US Open, and throughout Fan Week and the Main Draw, special recognitions and ceremonies will take place to honor the tradition and history of the event, as well as celebrate its great champions. In addition, the 2018 US Open marks the completion of the Strategic Transformation of the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center with the opening of the new 14,000-seat Louis Armstrong Stadium. In all, the five-year project, which revamped more than 90 percent of the facility, will have incorporated the installation of a retractable roof over Arthur Ashe Stadium, the construction of a new Louis Armstrong Stadium (also with a retractable roof), a new Grandstand, new West Stadium and practice courts, as well as a completely renovated and redesigned southern campus.

The 2018 US Open Tennis Championships Is The 50th Anniversary As A Pro Event – Here’s How You Can Get Tickets

The 2018 US Open marks the 50th Anniversary of the US Open (open to pros and amateurs), and throughout Fan Week and the Main Draw of the tournament, special recognitions and ceremonies will take place to honor the tradition and history of the event, as well as celebrate its great champions. In addition, the 2018 US Open marks the completion of the Strategic Transformation of the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center with the opening of the new 14,000-seat Louis Armstrong Stadium. In all, the five-year project, which revamped more than 90 percent of the facility, will have incorporated the installation of a retractable roof over Arthur Ashe Stadium, the construction of a new Louis Armstrong Stadium (also with a retractable roof), a new Grandstand, new West Stadium and practice courts, as well as a completely renovated and redesigned southern campus.

The main draw of the 2018 US Open will be held Monday, August 27, through Sunday, September 9, with Arthur Ashe Kids’ Day powered by Net Generation, a full day tennis and music festival for families and children, kicking off the US Open on Saturday, August 25. US Open Fan Week, which kicks off with the US Open Qualifying Tournament on Tuesday, August 21, consists of a series of free events taking place at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center and in the New York area.

Tickets for the 2018 US Open and the Arthur Ashe Kids’ Day powered by Net Generation stadium show can be purchased via:
• USOpen.org and the US Open app
• Ticketmaster.com and the Ticketmaster app
• 1-866-OPEN-TIX

Payment can be made by credit card – American Express is the Official Card of the US Open.

For ticket plan availability, group sales, disabled seating and other US Open information, visit USOpen.org or call 718-760-6363.

The 2018 US Open will feature day sessions beginning at 11:00 a.m. and night sessions beginning at 7:00 p.m. from Monday, August 27 through the quarterfinals on Wednesday, September 5 (Wednesday, September 5 will feature a 12:00 p.m. day session). The Women’s Semifinals are scheduled for 7:00 p.m. on Thursday, September 6 and the Men’s Semifinals for 4:00 p.m. on Friday, September 7. The Women’s Singles Final is scheduled for Saturday, September 8 at 4:00 p.m., and the Men’s Singles Final for 4:00 p.m. on Sunday, September 9.

In 2018, both Arthur Ashe Stadium and the new Louis Armstrong Stadium will hold dedicated day and night sessions. This marks the first time that a second stadium will feature a night session at the US Open. With the new Louis Armstrong Stadium also being equipped with a retractable roof, there will be a larger number of matches played on schedule, regardless of weather conditions.

For the fourth straight year, the US Open will be distributed first-ball to last-ball, live and exclusively across the ESPN family of networks, on ESPN, ESPN2 and ESPN digital platforms. In addition, an hour-long Arthur Ashe Kids’ Day powered by Net Generation special will air at 2:00 p.m. ET on ABC on Sunday, August 26.

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The USTA is the national governing body for the sport of tennis in the U.S. and the leader in promoting and developing the growth of tennis at every level — from local communities to the highest level of the professional game. A not-for-profit organization with more than 655,000 members, it invests 100% of its proceeds in growing the game. It owns and operates the US Open, one of the highest-attended annual sporting events in the world, and launched the US Open Series, linking seven summer WTA and ATP World Tour tournaments to the US Open. In addition, it owns approximately 90 Pro Circuit events throughout the U.S. and selects the teams for the Davis Cup, Fed Cup, Olympic and Paralympic Games. The USTA’s philanthropic entity, the USTA Foundation, provides grants and scholarships in addition to supporting tennis and education programs nationwide to benefit under-resourced youth through the National Junior Tennis & Learning (NJTL) network. For more information about the USTA, go to USTA.com or follow the official accounts on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and Snapchat.

USTA Plans Celebrations For 50th Anniversary of U.S. Open

The USTA announced a slate of special events and activities it has planned to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the US Open. The U.S. National Championships became the US Open in 1968, as the event opened its doors to professional players for the first time. The USTA will activate programming across all its channels including publishing, retail, events, and digital programming to create broad-based offerings designed to celebrate the past and look to the future of America’s Grand Slam.

“This is a true milestone year for the USTA and the US Open,” said Katrina Adams, USTA Chairman of the Board and President. “With the completion of our five-year transformation of the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center, we are now positioned to celebrate our tremendous history, while being poised for future growth.”

One of the most visible initiatives is the introduction of a bold new logo for the event. The logo, created by renowned graphic design firm Chermayeff & Geismar & Haviv, is a streamlined and modernized version of the tournament’s iconic flaming ball logo, which was first introduced in 1997. This new logo was designed to create a visual identity for the tournament that will last far into the future.

The new logo will feature prominently in the US Open’s 2018 advertising campaign, “Built for Glory.” The new campaign, created by long-time US Open agency partner McGarryBowen, leverages the new visual identity along with creative elements inspired by the transformation of the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center, home of the US Open since 1978. The campaign will begin to roll out on US Open digital and social channels and broadcast platforms, with an expanded multi-platform media plan set for the summer.

“The new logo is bold and energetic, and better captures and expresses the dynamism of the US Open,” said USTA Chief Marketing Officer Amy Choyne. “We have enjoyed 50 years of greatness and our new visual identity will better carry us forward for the next 50 years.”

50th Anniversary celebratory events will be integrated into all US Open activities in 2018. The second year of “The US Open Experience” will feature appearances by former champions and other special guests at a location to be determined in New York City on Thursday, August 23 and Friday, August 24. The USTA also plans to hold 50th Anniversary events, including special appearances, autograph sessions, and photo opportunities during “Fan Week” from August 21, through August 26.

A full line of products featuring the new logo will be available this spring and summer, and the USTA is also working with its licensees to create specific 50th Anniversary merchandise and products.

In addition, the USTA is working with the noted publisher of art and graphic books, Abrams Publishing, to create a 50th Anniversary book that captures the comprehensive history of the tournament and its champions.

Digitally, the USTA is producing a host of 50th Anniversary programming for its broadcast partners, websites and social channels. In conjunction with the introduction of the new logo, the USTA and long-time technology partner IBM will fully redesign USOpen.org to echo the innovative style of the new mark. Additionally, the USTA will create a 50th Anniversary docu-series featuring a number of 15-minute thematic episodes. Each episode will be themed to major accomplishments and innovations over the 50-year span of the tournament, including equal prize money for women and men, the introduction of technological innovations to the game, the elevation of the on-site fan experience, and other topics. A second series of vignettes, tied to the Built for Glory campaign, also will be produced and offered to US Open domestic and international broadcast partners. The fast-paced pieces will capture the entire US Open experience, from the top players, to celebrity chefs to great historic moments.

This year also marks the conclusion of the five-year strategic transformation of the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center. The new Louis Armstrong Stadium, a state-of-the-art, 14,000 seat stadium with a retractable roof will debut at the 2018 US Open. In addition to the new Louis Armstrong, the $600M transformation includes two new stadiums, a retractable roof over Arthur Ashe Stadium, and completely redesigned grounds that have improved the US Open experience for players and fans alike.

The 2018 US Open begins on Monday, August 27 and runs through Monday, September 9. A full schedule of US Open 50th Anniversary events will be released this summer

40 Years Ago Elvis Died Just Before A Memorable U.S. Open

By Randy Walker

@TennisPublisher

 

I called my book publishing client and good pal Cliff Richey just before the 2017 US Open to ask him what he remembered from the 1977 U.S. Open, the last to be played at the West Side Tennis Club at Forest Hills.

“I remember that Elvis had just died,” said Richey.

Perhaps it was the recent death of “The King” that precipitated what might be regarded as the craziest U.S. Open in history. The event featured a transsexual entry, a player playing with a racquet strung with rubber bands – and beating a former U.S. Open champion – John McEnroe’s first ever US Open point penalty and a fan being shot in the stands.

For Richey, it was also an unusual tournament for him as he lost in the second round to two-time French champion Jan Kodes. “It was the only time I ever lost to him,” said Richey.

The following are summaries of some of the unusual events from the 1977 U.S. Open, as documented in my book “On This Day In Tennis History” that is available as a book, ebook, audio book and mobile app, where books are sold and at www.TennisHistoryApp.com

 

August 31, 1977: John McEnroe plays his first U.S. Open match and receives his first U.S. Open code of conduct point penalty in his 6-1, 6-3 win over fellow 18-year-old Eliot Teltscher in a first-round night match at the West Side Tennis Club at Forest Hills. Chair umpire Patti Ingersol of Chicago issues the conduct violation after McEnroe stalls and argues over several calls in the second set. Following the point penalty, McEnroe serves the next point underhand and Teltscher, in a show of solidarity to McEnroe over the point penalty, lets the ball bounce twice, surrendering the point to McEnroe. Says McEnroe of his point penalty, “I was just mumbling under my breath and she assumed I said something. No one knows what I said. I was just saying I can’t believe the match was going like this and she said “Love-15.” I guess she was just trying to show her authority, but I think she went overboard.”

September 1, 1977: Renee Richards, the 43-year-old transsexual who fights for more than year for the right to play in the women’s singles of a major tennis championship, is beaten in the first round of the U.S. Open by Wimbledon champion Virginia Wade, 6-1, 6-4. Barry Lorge of the Washington Post describes the match as a media event as “a swarm of photographers, broadcasters and reporters were on hand to record the details of what was purposed to be a grand gesture for human rights by some, and a freak show by others.” Later that evening, 5-foot tall, 90-pound Tracy Austin, at the age of 14 years, eight months, 20 days, becomes the youngest player to play in the U.S. Open, defeating Heidi Eisterlehner of West Germany 3-6, 6-3, 6-1 in the first round. Austin’s mark would be broken in 1979 by 14-year-old Kathy Horvath.

September 2, 1977: Using the eventually outlawed “spaghetti strings,” 22-year-old Mike Fishbach upsets No. 16 seed Stan Smith 6-0, 6-2 in a best-of-three-set second round match at the U.S. Open. Fishbach, described as “an amply beared, amusing, apple juice-slugging refugee from the satellite circuit,” by the Washington Post, uses a racquet that he has strung with two interwoven layers of gut reinforced with fish test line, adhesive tape and twine that helps him generate extraordinary amounts of spin. The stringing method is eventually outlawed for the governing bodies of tennis.

September 4, 1977: James Reilly, a 33-year-old resident of New York City, is shot in the left thigh as a spectator at the John McEnroe – Eddie Dibbs third-round night match at the U.S. Open at the West Side Tennis Club in Forest Hills. The shooting, from a .38 caliber gun, occurs at the start of the match near Portal 8 in the north section of the stadium and delays play for about six minutes as Reilly is taken from the stands to the first aid station and then to nearby St. John’s Hospital. Most of the 6, 943 fans in attendance are not aware that a shooting had occurred. Police conclude it was likely a shot that came from outside the stadium. McEnroe wins the best-of-three set match 6-2, 4-6, 6-4.

September 6, 1977: Top-seed Bjorn Borg dramatically quits his round of 16 match with Dick Stockton at the U.S. Open – a sore right shoulder not allowing him to continue as Stockton advances into the quarterfinals by a 3-6, 6-4, 1-0, ret. score-line. Says Stockton, “I’ll take the victory any way I can get it, but I would liked to have seen the match continue. I think I would have won it anyway.“ Also in the round of 16, Manuel Orantes ends the debut U.S. Open of John McEnroe, defeating the 18-year-old New Yorker 6-2, 6-3.

September 11, 1977: Guillermo Vilas and Jimmy Connors compete in the final U.S. Open match played at the West Side Tennis Club with Vilas pulling 2-6, 6-3, 7-6, 6-0 upset of Connors in the men’s singles final. After hosting the U.S. Championships since 1915, the U.S. Open moves from the private club in Forest Hills to the other side of the Queens borough of New York City to the new USTA National Tennis Center, a public tennis facility.

Nadal Continues Capturing Slams

Rafael Nadal won his 16th Grand Slam singles title, and third US Open, in today’s well-fought but straight-sets win over first-time Slam finalist Kevin Anderson, 6-3, 6-3, 6-4.

Nadal’s long career shows no signs of slowing down. He won two major titles this year (including his 10th Roland-Garros championship). “I wake up every morning with the passion to go on court and to try to improve things. That’s why I still have chances to compete in this sport,” he says. “I still feel the nerves every time that I go on court. When some day arrives that I don’t feel those nerves or that extra passion for the game that I feel, it will be the day to say, ‘OK, I’ll do another thing.’ ”

Photo by Chris Nicholson, author of ‘Photographing Tennis.’ Follow Chris’ US Open photos on Instagram (@ShootingTennis).

Sloane Secures Her First Slam

Of the final four Americans in the women’s main draw of the US Open, Sloane Stephens was the last standing after defeating her good friend Madison Keys in the final 6-3, 6-0.

Both players came back from injuries in 2017, faced each other for the first time in a Grand Slam event, and were only the seventh pair of singles finalists in the Open Era to be appearing in their first Grand Slam championship match simultaneously. It was the 94th time an American woman has won the US Open singles trophy.

“I should just retire now,” Stephens said afterward. “I told Maddie I’m never going to be able to top this.”

Photo by Chris Nicholson, author of ‘Photographing Tennis.’ Follow Chris’ US Open photos on Instagram (@ShootingTennis).

Men’s Semis Set

Spain’s Pablo Carreno Busta didn’t take his first career Grand Slam semifinal laying down—not most of it, anyway. But opponent and eventual winner Kevin Anderson did run Busta around enough so that the Spaniard, exasperated, took a breather right on court after slipping to the ground.

Anderson, of South Africa, advanced to his first Grand Slam singles final with the 4-6, 7-5, 6-3, 6-4 upset. That final will be against Rafael Nadal, winner of 15 Grand Slam singles titles. “I’m sure there will be different emotions when I walk out onto the court on Sunday. But it will be very important for me as quickly as possible to really try, as much as I can, to block that out,” Anderson says. “Any match you face, you can be nervous. It’s just a larger scale. I’m looking forward to the opportunity. I have worked really hard to get here. It’s great I have given myself a spot.”

Photo by Chris Nicholson, author of ‘Photographing Tennis.’ Follow Chris’ US Open photos on Instagram (@ShootingTennis).

Wheelchair Tennis on Arthur Ashe Stadium For First Time

US Open wheelchair tennis was played for the first time ever today in Arthur Ashe Stadium. Great Britain’s Alfie Hewett and Gordon Reid, seeded No. 2, defeated Japan’s Shingo Kunedia and Argentina’s Gustavo Fernandez in the first match, 6-3, 6-2.

“We knew a few days ago that some matches would be played on Ashe,” said Hewett, 19. “I found out at 8 pm last night – it was a nice surprise.”

“It was incredible to have that opportunity as wheelchair players,” said Reid, 25. “It’s showing the respect that wheelchair tennis is gaining, a great first match here. It’s probably the nicest court I played on, so for me, it really is the stuff that dreams are made of, to play on Ashe. Hopefully, it’s not the last time.”

Following the men’s doubles match, American Dana Mathewson and Aniek van Koot, of the Netherlands, upset No. 2 seeds Yui Kamiji, of Japan, and Lucy Shuker, of Great Britain, in a tight 0-6, 6-4, [10-5], match.

The US Open Wheelchair Tennis Competition continues through Sunday across the men’s, women’s and quad divisions. It follows the same rules as able-bodied tennis except that the ball can bounce twice.

Wheelchair Tennis Debuts in Ashe Stadium

Arthur Ashe Stadium is celebrating its 20th year hosting US Open matches, yet none of those contests involved wheelchair tennis—until today. In the first stadium match of Day 11, Alfie Hewett (pictured) and Gordon Reid defeated Shingo Kunedia and Gustavo Fernandez, 6-3, 6-2, in the first wheelchair tennis match ever played on American tennis’ grandest stage. They were followed by women’s semifinalists Dana Mathewson and Aniek van Koot, who defeated Yui Kamiji and Lucy Shuker 0-6, 6-4, [10-5].

“It was incredible to have that opportunity as wheelchair players,” Reid says. “It’s showing the respect that wheelchair tennis is gaining, a great first match here. It’s probably the nicest court I played on, so for me, it really is the stuff that dreams are made of. Hopefully, it’s not the last time.”

Photo by Chris Nicholson, author of ‘Photographing Tennis.’ Follow Chris’ US Open photos on Instagram (@ShootingTennis).

US Open Celebrates 10-Year Anniversary of Being Green

The United States Tennis Association (USTA) celebrates the 10th anniversary of its Green Initiative program at the 2017 US Open. Since its inception in 2008, the US Open Green Initiative has expanded each year to continuously make environmentally-sustainable choices that reduce the impact the US Open has on the environment.

In this, the 10th year of the program, 90 percent of US Open waste will be diverted from landfills, 12,000 gallons of kitchen grease will be recycled into biodiesel fuel, and more than 60 tons of organic waste from US Open kitchens will be composted.

Since 2008, the US Open has reduced its greenhouse emissions by 94,000 metric tons through waste diversion, recycled paper use, carbon offsets, and renewable energy certificates. This includes the diversion of more than 3,400 tons of waste and the recycling of nearly 2.6 million plastic bottles. The US Open has obtained enough renewable energy credits to provide electricity to 1,600 homes for an entire year and has donated more than 100 tons of food to local communities.

In addition, as the USTA continues its strategic transformation of the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center, green building choices are incorporated into each step of the process, demonstrated by the LEED certification of the Grandstand Stadium and Transportation Building. The new Louis Armstrong Stadium, set to debut in 2018, is on track to be LEED certified for the 2018 US Open.

More than 95 percent of the waste from the demolition of both the original Grandstand and Louis Armstrong Stadiums was recycled. The new Louis Armstrong Stadium will use 40 percent less water through waterless urinals and low-flow plumbing fixtures. Landscaping around the new stadium has been designed to use 55 percent less water and the stadium, as a whole, has been designed to consume 25 percent less energy.

In collaboration with environmental consultant, eco evolutions, initiatives for 2017 include:

Waste Diversion

  • The USTA will recycle cardboard, plastics, glass and metals collected throughout the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center.
  • More than 60 tons of food waste will be collected from the kitchens to be turned into compost for landscape and farming uses.
  • The USTA will collect the 45,000 tennis balls used during the matches and player practices to reuse in USTA tennis programs and donate to various community and youth organizations nationwide.
  • Following the US Open, approximately 15,000 tennis ball cans are recycled.
  • From the kitchens at the US Open, approximately 12,000 gallons of food grease will be collected to convert into biodiesel fuel.
  • Unused food will be donated to the community.

Recycled Paper

  • More than 90% of the paper products, including the 2.4 million napkins in the general concession area will be made of recycled materials and/or compostable materials.
  • All US Open-related printed materials (US Open media guide, marketing collateral, tickets and the Daily Drawsheet, among others) are composed of at least 30 percent post-consumer waste.
  • US Open tickets are printed on paper comprised of 30 percent post-consumer waste, and parking books, parking visors and coupon books are printed on paper made up of 10-15 percent post-consumer waste.
  • All paper towel dispensers have been replaced with motion-sensor dispensers and all paper towels are comprised of 40 percent post-consumer waste.
  • Paper use is reduced through electronic communications to players, media and fans, and players have access to a player’s-only web portal.

Transportation

  • Carbon offsets are acquired for the estimated miles players travel by air as well as the miles they travel on the ground to get to the US Open.
  • Carbon offsets are also acquired for the estimated 800,000 vehicle miles traveled by employees to work at the US Open.

Energy

  • Champion Energy, the US Open’s energy supplier, is donating Green-e certified Renewable Energy Credits (RECs) to offset the electricity consumed during the 2017 US Open.
  • Carbon emissions from player travel and on site fuel use will be offset with the purchases of Green-e Climate Carbon Offsets.

Green Cleaning

  • Vendors are provided with a US Open Green Cleaning Policy specifying preferred cleaning products to be used during the US Open.

Site renovations and expansion

  • The stadium lights throughout the NTC have been replaced with LED lights which will reduce energy use by 50 percent.
  • Water refilling stations have been added to the site to encourage waste minimization by reducing single use water bottle.
  • As part of recent renovations at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center, the USTA has incorporated green building design elements (such as water efficient fixtures, recycling of construction waste, low emitting paints and sealants, recycled materials, efficient lighting and HVAC systems). To facilitate this process, the USTA has become members of the United Sates Green Building Council as of August 2013 and achieved LEED certification for the newest Grandstand Stadium and Transportation building. We are currently pursuing LEED certification for the new Armstrong Stadium.

Merchandising

  • At the US Open Collection merchandise locations, fans will receive with their purchase a US Open souvenir-style shopping bag designed for multiple-use.
  • The US Open Collection will include environmentally friendly items including a reusable tote made from 80 percent post-consumer waste, cinch bags constructed from recycled bottles and 100 percent recycled post-consumer and post-industrial paper product.

Fan Awareness

  • US Open Green Initiatives are featured in the official US Open Program.
  • Environmental tips are featured in the Daily Drawsheet as well as communicated through US Open social media channels. Labels on waste bins to educate fans on waste diversion program.
  • Signage on paper towel dispensers to remind fans to use only what they need.​
  • Signs in kitchens to educate staff on proper recycling and composting procedures.

Food

  • 20 percent of produce used during the Open is from local farms.