US Open

Can Novak Djokovic Win Another Wimbledon – U.S. Open Double?

Novak Djokovic entered Wimbledon this year having not won a tournament in a year. Now he could be on the verge of sweeping the two biggest titles in tennis.

Djokovic cemented his return to the top of the tennis world with his unexpected victory at Wimbledon in July, edging Rafael Nadal in an epic five-set semifinal and a straight-set final-round win over Kevin Anderson.

Now, Djokovic is on the verge of becoming only the second man in the Open era to win the Wimbledon and U.S. Open summer double more than twice, joining Roger Federer, who has turned the trick four times in 2004, 2005, 2006 and 2007. Djokovic swept Wimbledon and the US Open in 2011 and also in 2015.

Following Wimbledon, Djokovic also won the title in Cincinnati – to complete his career sweep of all nine Masters Series titles – defeating Roger Federer in the final. Despite his No. 6 seeding in New York, his win at Wimbledon and in Cincinnati see him trending upward in the tennis betting odds at the U.S. Open. After starting the year with a 6-6 record, he is now healthy and confident and inspired to win more titles and catch up to his rivals Federer (20) and Nadal (17) in the all-time major singles titles rankings.

Djokovic ended a career-long 54-week title drought with his fourth Wimbledon title and 13th major title overall. With a ranking of No. 21 at Wimbledon, he became the lowest-ranked major champion since No. 44 Gaston Gaudio at 2004 Roland Garros. His win continued the men’s trend of major men’s titles being won by primarily Federer, Nadal and Djokovic over the last ten years.

Djokovic’s only struggles en route to the semifinals were with the high temperatures and humidity. With cooler weather coming to New York City for the event’s finale, Djokovic, who often struggles in oppressive heat, will be much more comfortable.

Will The Chase For The US Open Men’s Title Be Predictable Once Again?

Starting with Roger Federer’s win at Wimbledon in 2004, only seven different men’s players have won major titles. That’s a span of 14 years and 56 major tournaments. The players are Federer, Rafa Nadal, Novak Djokovic, Andy Murray, Stan Wawrinka, Juan Martin del Potro and Marin Cilic.

It’s pretty safe to say than one of those seven will win the 2018 US Open men’s singles title.

The least likely among this group are Stan Wawrinka and Andy Murray. Both are coming off of serious injuries and surgeries (hip surgery for Andy Murray and knee surgery for Wawrinka) so the likelihood of them winning are slim.

Marin Cilic, the 2014 US Open champion, who has also reached the Wimbledon and Australian Open finals within the last 14 months, would be the next longest shot along with del Porto. Del Potro is playing his 22nd Grand Slam and Cilic is playing his 15th since winning US Open titles respectively. Either could set an Open Era record for most attempts before winning a second Grand Slam. Del Potro reached the semifinals last year – including a win over Federer in the quarterfinals – and his win in Indian Wells in March – prove that he is a force to be reckoned with on hard courts this year. To boot, he has belief that he can win on the grand stage of New York City after having won the title in 2009 beating Federer in a five-set final for his lone major singles title to date.

Next come the three overwhelming favorites, according to 888sport, – top seed and defending champion Nadal, Wimbledon champion Djokovic and five-time champ Federer.

Nadal is rightly the favorite, buoyed with his title in Toronto heading into New York and yet another amazing clay court season, capped by his incredible 11th French Open title. To boot, the courts at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center are playing slow, which perfectly plays into Nadal ‘s game. Nadal has lost three matches in 2018 — the same number he lost in 2013 entering the US Open. Nadal is 40-3 this season and was 53-3 at the start of the 2013 US Open, where he won his 13th Grand Slam title. The Spaniard has won six Grand Slam titles as the top seed, including the US Open in 2010 and 2017.

Despite being seeded No. 6, Djokovic is the No. 2 favorite for the title, based on his return to form after two years of injuries and mental fatigue. His title at Wimbledon announced his return to the top of the tennis world and he comes into the US Open hot after beating Roger Federer in the final of Cincinnati to become the first player to complete the modern-sweep of all “Masters Series” titles – to go with his career Grand Slam as well. Djokovic went 6-6 in his first six tournaments of 2018. He is 27-4 in six events since.

Federer is 37 years old and is not only battling these six other major contenders, but a brigade of youngsters, some of which really believe they can defeat the awe-inspiring 20-time major singles champion.

Federer is the all-time leader with 20 Grand Slam men’s singles titles and 310 weeks at No. 1 in the ATP Rankings. The Swiss could extend those records and set several new ones during the 2018 US Open. Federer seeks his sixth US Open title, which would break a three-way tie for most in the Open Era. Federer, 37, bids to become the oldest US Open champion in the Open Era (and oldest US Open finalist since 1974).

Among the outsiders from these seven contenders are three players who have never won a major title. Alexander Zverev reaches the most attention as the No. 4 seed, who has yet to excel on the Grand Slam tournament stage. However, with new super coach Ivan Lendl in his corner, keep a close eye on the German. John Isner, the top American player, is going through his best stretch of tennis, winning his first Masters Series title in Miami, and achieving his career results at the French Open (Round of 16) and Wimbledon (semifinals). Also to look out for Kevin Anderson, who took advantage of the open draw last year blown open by the late withdrawal of Andy Murray to reach the final, losing to Nadal, but also made his own hole in the draw at Wimbledon earlier this summer beating both Federer and Isner in extended fifth-set matches to reach the final, falling to Djokovic.

New Louis Armstrong Stadium – With A Roof – Dedicated

In terms of grand openings, this one was fit for kings — or more appropriately, Queens — that surely left a number of legends of tennis and music and thousands of fans of both wondering just what the late Louis Armstrong would have thought to himself.

The shimmering new Louis Armstrong Stadium was officially dedicated at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center on Wednesday with a bold, brassy commemoration befitting both the US Open and the legendary Satchmo.

With the brand new, 14,069-seat stadium serving as both the theater and the main attraction on US Open’s Queens Day, Queens’ own John McEnroe waxed poetic on his four US Open championships. Jazz legend Wynton Marsalis led an eight-piece marching band in a musical performance straight from Bourbon Street. James Blake and Michael Chang then triumphed over John and his brother Patrick in a Legends doubles match that served as a fitting encore.

Nearly 1,800 fans were on-hand to witness it all.

The Curious Case of Sam Querrey

by Bob Stockton

2017 seemed like it was going to be a transformative year in Sam Querrey’s career, marking the reinvention of an inconsistent outsider as a player with genuine designs on reaching a Grand Slam final. The American delivered career-best performances at three of the four Grand Slams. Admittedly, reaching the third round of the Australian Open for the fifth time but failing to progress further is nothing to write home about, but a first Slam semi-final at Wimbledon followed by a first quarter-final at the US Open made 2017 a very good year for Querrey.

Querrey has always had the potential to beat anyone when at his peak level. There are players in the top 20 who are more consistent but lack the ability to reach a higher plane on occasion, with the likes of Pablo Carreno Busta, David Goffin and Roberto Bautista Agut all distinguished players but the kind of performers who could feasibly play their best against the world number 1 and still lose. There are other players in the top 20 who have mercurial talent and can be unstoppable for sets and matches at a time, such as the maverick Fabio Fognini and the erratic Grigor Dimitrov.

Querrey fits into that category, with his form at Wimbledon an indictment of this. In 2016, Querrey stunned world number 1 Novak Djokovic in the third round, with the American considered a massive outsider but able to reach a new level. If that wasn’t enough, Querrey repeated this feat the following year by beating home favourite and world number 1 Andy Murray in the Wimbledon quarter-final. Admittedly, there were question marks over both Djokovic’s and Murray’s fitness, but often those players can use their intimidating aura to grind through and exploit opponents’ weakness. Querrey played like a man possessed, possessed by a better tennis player than usual.

There are two key elements to consider when analysing if a player can win a Grand Slam for the first time: can they beat the best, and do they have the resilience to deliver a good level for a fortnight? A look at the latest tennis odds with bet365 for the US Open sees Querrey priced at 80/1 to win the title, a price that reflects that his ability to beat the best is currently outweighed by question marks over his consistency. This is why John Isner is at a much shorter price of 40/1, with Querrey’s fellow big-serving American much more dependable.

For example, Isner is less likely to lose to a player ranked outside the top 300 when defending a title. This is what Querrey served up at Los Cabos, falling to rank outsider Egor Gerasimov in the round of sixteen in a tournament at which he arrived as reigning champion. Querrey has endured a tough 2018. After winning the first set at the French Open against Gilles Simon, Querrey promptly rolled over. He repeated this feat at Wimbledon against Gael Monfils, made all the more disappointing considering his form in London.

Querrey may have given the world one of the great tennis-related videos through his dancing skills, but he will be determined to discover if he can give the sport one of the great Grand Slam final performances. If he can bring his best to the US Open this year then he will strike fear into the tournament favourites. The signs don’t necessarily suggest that this is too likely at this stage, but that’s the thing with mercurial talents: there’s no telling when they’ll bring their best.

Novak Djokovic Return To Top Can Revitalise Men’s Tennis

Nobody would have begrudged seeing Roger Federer lift his eighth Wimbledon title last year, nor would anyone have felt the Swiss master didn’t deserve to hit Slam number 20 in Australia in January. In a similar fashion, we sat back and marvelled at Rafael Nadal taking his 11th title on the clay of Roland Garros in May.

However, while we are lucky to live in an era of greats in the men’s game, there was something processionary about the Grand Slams in recent times, as if we were simply waiting to crown Federer or Nadal, even before the tournament started.

Last month at Wimbledon, Novak Djokovic served us a timely reminder that he too should be mentioned among the all-time greats. His 13th Slam was wrapped up with the minimum of fuss against Kevin Anderson, but it was the semi-final, a five-set epic against Nadal, that really showed us how much we missed the unflappable Serb.

Bookmakers were quick to act on Djokovic seemingly putting those injury woes behind him and making his way back to the top, with 888sport putting him as favourite in the 2018 outright US Open odds. The Serb comes in at 11/4 at the moment, with Nadal and Federer both at 7/2. That’s pretty tight, suggesting the odds-setters feel anyone of the three could win. Indeed, any suspicion of a niggle or slight injury, and those odds could change.
Odds show competitiveness is back

However, seeing three players right at the top of the betting markets is good news for the men’s game. We must remember that that in the last two Slams, Nadal was odds-on for the French Open and Federer was a very short price (around 13/8) to win Wimbledon. Having Djokovic back adds another dimension to the elite level of the game.
Of course, nobody is ruling out a push from players outside this celebrated trio: Alexander Zverev, a player who keeps promising to fully bloom, is priced at 9/1, Del Potro is available at 10/1. Andy Murray, whose injury problems are hopefully behind him, is also available at 10/1, but match sharpness may elude the former world number one.

Put simply, the upcoming US Open (27th August – 9th September) feels like the first Grand Slam in a while where we do not have an overwhelming favourite from the outset. Having Djokovic, Federer and Nadal all fit will also open up some subplots: Can Federer extend his record of Slams to 21? Can Nadal rein Federer in by winning his 18th? Can Djokovic equal Pete Sampras’ tally of 14 titles and regain his place at the top of the game.

‘Big 4’ could return to dominance
For all the talk of dominance of individuals over the past 15 years, it is also the rivalry within the ‘Big 4’ that has made men’s tennis, at times, unmissable. You’ll have to go back to 2012 to see the last time when the ‘Big 4’ each won a Grand Slam in the same season, but it was also an era when it was also incredibly difficult to predict who would come out on top, Nadal at Roland Garros excepted.

With Djokovic seemingly back to full fitness and, hopefully, Murray also getting healthy, we could be in for a treat over the next couple of years. Wimbledon sewed the seeds of some great rivalries to be re-established, let’s hope we, as fans, reap the benefit, starting in New York in a few weeks.

2018 US Open To Feature Electronic Line Calling On All Courts

The USTA announced that electronic line calling will be utilized on all tournament courts at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center for the first time at the 2018 US Open. In 2006, the US Open became the first Grand Slam event to use electronic line calling during play, featuring video replay in Arthur Ashe Stadium, and now the US Open will be the first Grand Slam to utilize electronic line calling on all match courts.

In 2018, all Men’s and Women’s Singles, Doubles and Mixed Doubles events will be scheduled to feature electronic line calling technology. Having the technology available on all tournament courts provides a level of consistency and fairness throughout the tournament.

“Having electronic line calling on all of our courts allows us to provide a level playing field for all competitors,” said David Brewer, US Open Tournament Director. “The US Open has a history of innovation, and by becoming the first Grand Slam to feature this technology on all courts, we are proud to carry-on that tradition.”

Since 2007, the US Open’s replay challenge system has been sponsored by Chase and is called the “Chase Review” in-venue and during the domestic broadcast of the US Open.

The four main stadium courts (Arthur Ashe Stadium, Louis Armstrong Stadium, Grandstand, Court 17) will house instant replay teams within each stadium. A centralized office housed inside the broadcast compound on the grounds of the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center will handle the electronic line calling for all other courts. In this office, each court will be given a dedicated two-man team, consisting of a Review Official and a Hawk-Eye technician.

The implementation of this technology was made possible by the Strategic Transformation of the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center, which will be completed this year, as it afforded the opportunity to install the necessary technology throughout the grounds, in a cost-efficient manner.

Last year seven courts showcased electronic line calling: Arthur Ashe Stadium, Louis Armstrong Stadium (temporary structure), Grandstand, Court 17, Court 5, Court 10 and Court 13.

This year’s tournament marks the 50th Anniversary of the US Open, and throughout Fan Week and the Main Draw, special recognitions and ceremonies will take place to honor the tradition and history of the event, as well as celebrate its great champions. In addition, the 2018 US Open marks the completion of the Strategic Transformation of the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center with the opening of the new 14,000-seat Louis Armstrong Stadium. In all, the five-year project, which revamped more than 90 percent of the facility, will have incorporated the installation of a retractable roof over Arthur Ashe Stadium, the construction of a new Louis Armstrong Stadium (also with a retractable roof), a new Grandstand, new West Stadium and practice courts, as well as a completely renovated and redesigned southern campus.

The 2018 US Open Tennis Championships Is The 50th Anniversary As A Pro Event – Here’s How You Can Get Tickets

The 2018 US Open marks the 50th Anniversary of the US Open (open to pros and amateurs), and throughout Fan Week and the Main Draw of the tournament, special recognitions and ceremonies will take place to honor the tradition and history of the event, as well as celebrate its great champions. In addition, the 2018 US Open marks the completion of the Strategic Transformation of the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center with the opening of the new 14,000-seat Louis Armstrong Stadium. In all, the five-year project, which revamped more than 90 percent of the facility, will have incorporated the installation of a retractable roof over Arthur Ashe Stadium, the construction of a new Louis Armstrong Stadium (also with a retractable roof), a new Grandstand, new West Stadium and practice courts, as well as a completely renovated and redesigned southern campus.

The main draw of the 2018 US Open will be held Monday, August 27, through Sunday, September 9, with Arthur Ashe Kids’ Day powered by Net Generation, a full day tennis and music festival for families and children, kicking off the US Open on Saturday, August 25. US Open Fan Week, which kicks off with the US Open Qualifying Tournament on Tuesday, August 21, consists of a series of free events taking place at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center and in the New York area.

Tickets for the 2018 US Open and the Arthur Ashe Kids’ Day powered by Net Generation stadium show can be purchased via:
• USOpen.org and the US Open app
• Ticketmaster.com and the Ticketmaster app
• 1-866-OPEN-TIX

Payment can be made by credit card – American Express is the Official Card of the US Open.

For ticket plan availability, group sales, disabled seating and other US Open information, visit USOpen.org or call 718-760-6363.

The 2018 US Open will feature day sessions beginning at 11:00 a.m. and night sessions beginning at 7:00 p.m. from Monday, August 27 through the quarterfinals on Wednesday, September 5 (Wednesday, September 5 will feature a 12:00 p.m. day session). The Women’s Semifinals are scheduled for 7:00 p.m. on Thursday, September 6 and the Men’s Semifinals for 4:00 p.m. on Friday, September 7. The Women’s Singles Final is scheduled for Saturday, September 8 at 4:00 p.m., and the Men’s Singles Final for 4:00 p.m. on Sunday, September 9.

In 2018, both Arthur Ashe Stadium and the new Louis Armstrong Stadium will hold dedicated day and night sessions. This marks the first time that a second stadium will feature a night session at the US Open. With the new Louis Armstrong Stadium also being equipped with a retractable roof, there will be a larger number of matches played on schedule, regardless of weather conditions.

For the fourth straight year, the US Open will be distributed first-ball to last-ball, live and exclusively across the ESPN family of networks, on ESPN, ESPN2 and ESPN digital platforms. In addition, an hour-long Arthur Ashe Kids’ Day powered by Net Generation special will air at 2:00 p.m. ET on ABC on Sunday, August 26.

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The USTA is the national governing body for the sport of tennis in the U.S. and the leader in promoting and developing the growth of tennis at every level — from local communities to the highest level of the professional game. A not-for-profit organization with more than 655,000 members, it invests 100% of its proceeds in growing the game. It owns and operates the US Open, one of the highest-attended annual sporting events in the world, and launched the US Open Series, linking seven summer WTA and ATP World Tour tournaments to the US Open. In addition, it owns approximately 90 Pro Circuit events throughout the U.S. and selects the teams for the Davis Cup, Fed Cup, Olympic and Paralympic Games. The USTA’s philanthropic entity, the USTA Foundation, provides grants and scholarships in addition to supporting tennis and education programs nationwide to benefit under-resourced youth through the National Junior Tennis & Learning (NJTL) network. For more information about the USTA, go to USTA.com or follow the official accounts on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and Snapchat.

USTA Plans Celebrations For 50th Anniversary of U.S. Open

The USTA announced a slate of special events and activities it has planned to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the US Open. The U.S. National Championships became the US Open in 1968, as the event opened its doors to professional players for the first time. The USTA will activate programming across all its channels including publishing, retail, events, and digital programming to create broad-based offerings designed to celebrate the past and look to the future of America’s Grand Slam.

“This is a true milestone year for the USTA and the US Open,” said Katrina Adams, USTA Chairman of the Board and President. “With the completion of our five-year transformation of the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center, we are now positioned to celebrate our tremendous history, while being poised for future growth.”

One of the most visible initiatives is the introduction of a bold new logo for the event. The logo, created by renowned graphic design firm Chermayeff & Geismar & Haviv, is a streamlined and modernized version of the tournament’s iconic flaming ball logo, which was first introduced in 1997. This new logo was designed to create a visual identity for the tournament that will last far into the future.

The new logo will feature prominently in the US Open’s 2018 advertising campaign, “Built for Glory.” The new campaign, created by long-time US Open agency partner McGarryBowen, leverages the new visual identity along with creative elements inspired by the transformation of the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center, home of the US Open since 1978. The campaign will begin to roll out on US Open digital and social channels and broadcast platforms, with an expanded multi-platform media plan set for the summer.

“The new logo is bold and energetic, and better captures and expresses the dynamism of the US Open,” said USTA Chief Marketing Officer Amy Choyne. “We have enjoyed 50 years of greatness and our new visual identity will better carry us forward for the next 50 years.”

50th Anniversary celebratory events will be integrated into all US Open activities in 2018. The second year of “The US Open Experience” will feature appearances by former champions and other special guests at a location to be determined in New York City on Thursday, August 23 and Friday, August 24. The USTA also plans to hold 50th Anniversary events, including special appearances, autograph sessions, and photo opportunities during “Fan Week” from August 21, through August 26.

A full line of products featuring the new logo will be available this spring and summer, and the USTA is also working with its licensees to create specific 50th Anniversary merchandise and products.

In addition, the USTA is working with the noted publisher of art and graphic books, Abrams Publishing, to create a 50th Anniversary book that captures the comprehensive history of the tournament and its champions.

Digitally, the USTA is producing a host of 50th Anniversary programming for its broadcast partners, websites and social channels. In conjunction with the introduction of the new logo, the USTA and long-time technology partner IBM will fully redesign USOpen.org to echo the innovative style of the new mark. Additionally, the USTA will create a 50th Anniversary docu-series featuring a number of 15-minute thematic episodes. Each episode will be themed to major accomplishments and innovations over the 50-year span of the tournament, including equal prize money for women and men, the introduction of technological innovations to the game, the elevation of the on-site fan experience, and other topics. A second series of vignettes, tied to the Built for Glory campaign, also will be produced and offered to US Open domestic and international broadcast partners. The fast-paced pieces will capture the entire US Open experience, from the top players, to celebrity chefs to great historic moments.

This year also marks the conclusion of the five-year strategic transformation of the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center. The new Louis Armstrong Stadium, a state-of-the-art, 14,000 seat stadium with a retractable roof will debut at the 2018 US Open. In addition to the new Louis Armstrong, the $600M transformation includes two new stadiums, a retractable roof over Arthur Ashe Stadium, and completely redesigned grounds that have improved the US Open experience for players and fans alike.

The 2018 US Open begins on Monday, August 27 and runs through Monday, September 9. A full schedule of US Open 50th Anniversary events will be released this summer

40 Years Ago Elvis Died Just Before A Memorable U.S. Open

By Randy Walker

@TennisPublisher

 

I called my book publishing client and good pal Cliff Richey just before the 2017 US Open to ask him what he remembered from the 1977 U.S. Open, the last to be played at the West Side Tennis Club at Forest Hills.

“I remember that Elvis had just died,” said Richey.

Perhaps it was the recent death of “The King” that precipitated what might be regarded as the craziest U.S. Open in history. The event featured a transsexual entry, a player playing with a racquet strung with rubber bands – and beating a former U.S. Open champion – John McEnroe’s first ever US Open point penalty and a fan being shot in the stands.

For Richey, it was also an unusual tournament for him as he lost in the second round to two-time French champion Jan Kodes. “It was the only time I ever lost to him,” said Richey.

The following are summaries of some of the unusual events from the 1977 U.S. Open, as documented in my book “On This Day In Tennis History” that is available as a book, ebook, audio book and mobile app, where books are sold and at www.TennisHistoryApp.com

 

August 31, 1977: John McEnroe plays his first U.S. Open match and receives his first U.S. Open code of conduct point penalty in his 6-1, 6-3 win over fellow 18-year-old Eliot Teltscher in a first-round night match at the West Side Tennis Club at Forest Hills. Chair umpire Patti Ingersol of Chicago issues the conduct violation after McEnroe stalls and argues over several calls in the second set. Following the point penalty, McEnroe serves the next point underhand and Teltscher, in a show of solidarity to McEnroe over the point penalty, lets the ball bounce twice, surrendering the point to McEnroe. Says McEnroe of his point penalty, “I was just mumbling under my breath and she assumed I said something. No one knows what I said. I was just saying I can’t believe the match was going like this and she said “Love-15.” I guess she was just trying to show her authority, but I think she went overboard.”

September 1, 1977: Renee Richards, the 43-year-old transsexual who fights for more than year for the right to play in the women’s singles of a major tennis championship, is beaten in the first round of the U.S. Open by Wimbledon champion Virginia Wade, 6-1, 6-4. Barry Lorge of the Washington Post describes the match as a media event as “a swarm of photographers, broadcasters and reporters were on hand to record the details of what was purposed to be a grand gesture for human rights by some, and a freak show by others.” Later that evening, 5-foot tall, 90-pound Tracy Austin, at the age of 14 years, eight months, 20 days, becomes the youngest player to play in the U.S. Open, defeating Heidi Eisterlehner of West Germany 3-6, 6-3, 6-1 in the first round. Austin’s mark would be broken in 1979 by 14-year-old Kathy Horvath.

September 2, 1977: Using the eventually outlawed “spaghetti strings,” 22-year-old Mike Fishbach upsets No. 16 seed Stan Smith 6-0, 6-2 in a best-of-three-set second round match at the U.S. Open. Fishbach, described as “an amply beared, amusing, apple juice-slugging refugee from the satellite circuit,” by the Washington Post, uses a racquet that he has strung with two interwoven layers of gut reinforced with fish test line, adhesive tape and twine that helps him generate extraordinary amounts of spin. The stringing method is eventually outlawed for the governing bodies of tennis.

September 4, 1977: James Reilly, a 33-year-old resident of New York City, is shot in the left thigh as a spectator at the John McEnroe – Eddie Dibbs third-round night match at the U.S. Open at the West Side Tennis Club in Forest Hills. The shooting, from a .38 caliber gun, occurs at the start of the match near Portal 8 in the north section of the stadium and delays play for about six minutes as Reilly is taken from the stands to the first aid station and then to nearby St. John’s Hospital. Most of the 6, 943 fans in attendance are not aware that a shooting had occurred. Police conclude it was likely a shot that came from outside the stadium. McEnroe wins the best-of-three set match 6-2, 4-6, 6-4.

September 6, 1977: Top-seed Bjorn Borg dramatically quits his round of 16 match with Dick Stockton at the U.S. Open – a sore right shoulder not allowing him to continue as Stockton advances into the quarterfinals by a 3-6, 6-4, 1-0, ret. score-line. Says Stockton, “I’ll take the victory any way I can get it, but I would liked to have seen the match continue. I think I would have won it anyway.“ Also in the round of 16, Manuel Orantes ends the debut U.S. Open of John McEnroe, defeating the 18-year-old New Yorker 6-2, 6-3.

September 11, 1977: Guillermo Vilas and Jimmy Connors compete in the final U.S. Open match played at the West Side Tennis Club with Vilas pulling 2-6, 6-3, 7-6, 6-0 upset of Connors in the men’s singles final. After hosting the U.S. Championships since 1915, the U.S. Open moves from the private club in Forest Hills to the other side of the Queens borough of New York City to the new USTA National Tennis Center, a public tennis facility.

Nadal Continues Capturing Slams

Rafael Nadal won his 16th Grand Slam singles title, and third US Open, in today’s well-fought but straight-sets win over first-time Slam finalist Kevin Anderson, 6-3, 6-3, 6-4.

Nadal’s long career shows no signs of slowing down. He won two major titles this year (including his 10th Roland-Garros championship). “I wake up every morning with the passion to go on court and to try to improve things. That’s why I still have chances to compete in this sport,” he says. “I still feel the nerves every time that I go on court. When some day arrives that I don’t feel those nerves or that extra passion for the game that I feel, it will be the day to say, ‘OK, I’ll do another thing.’ ”

Photo by Chris Nicholson, author of ‘Photographing Tennis.’ Follow Chris’ US Open photos on Instagram (@ShootingTennis).