Tennis

High-Profile Abu Dhabi Exhibition Tournament Moves Earlier Before Christmas

Abu Dhabi, UAE: The 12th Mubadala World Tennis Championship is swapping ‘new balls please’ for ‘new dates please’. Tournament owner Flash Entertainment has announced the Arabian Gulf’s leading professional tennis experience will return to Abu Dhabi’s International Tennis Centre at Zayed Sports City from 19-21 December 2019 – one week earlier than its traditional spot on the calendar.

The tournament’s new dates are expected to increase the number of tennis fans, families and friends from the UAE and beyond swinging into the festive season by catching eight of the world’s leading tennis players – six male and two female – live in the UAE capital.

The strategic date switch is also designed to increase international attendance at the event, as pre-Christmas tourists combine world-class tennis action with Abu Dhabi’s distinct blend of hospitality, culture, tolerance and outstanding event organisation.

“The Mubadala World Tennis Championship has always been a huge hit with people from across the globe, offering intimate and unrivalled access to the world’s best players in a special, festival atmosphere. We are constantly looking to evolve the event and the new dates will enhance the senses of visitors and further cement Abu Dhabi’s reputation as the perfect winter holiday destination,” said John Lickrish, CEO, Flash Entertainment.
“The 12th Mubadala World Tennis Championship is picture perfect for spectators, with top-class on-court action, our popular Kids’ Day, player activities and a diverse bill of entertainment options off-court. The new dates have enabled us to enhance the spectator experience and the Tennis Village will be packed with fun festive activities for all. We look forward to welcoming everyone over the three days.”

Rashed Alharmoodi, Head of External Corporate Relations for Mubadala, the title sponsor of the tournament, commented: “Our long-standing support of this tournament is focused on the benefits it offers the community. Bringing world-class sports stars to the nation’s capital provides a great spectacle for sports fans while presenting role models for young people. It’s an opportunity for us to work with our partners to promote healthy living and an active lifestyle through tennis. Zayed Sports City is a fantastic, world-class venue for this event and we’re pleased with the role the Championship plays in promoting Abu Dhabi internationally.”

In addition to nine top-class matches across the three days, spectators can enjoy tennis clinics, autograph and question-and-answer sessions with the players and get involved in interactive competitions. Tournament hospitality offers unmissable food and beverage, while the grand slam range of F&B in the Tennis Village caters to all tastes.
Pre-registration for tickets is now open at http://www.mubadalawtc.com/pre-register-for-one-of-the-most-exclusive-experiences/ with tickets going on sale in July. Those who register for the special three-day package will earn the chance to purchase some of the best available seats closest to the action and an opportunity to meet the star players in the ‘MWTC Human Letter’ activation during the media day on December 18.For more information, visit www.mubadalawtc.com.

ATP Promotions Work To Connect With Pop Culture

by Sharada Rajagopalan

Both on the men’s and women’s side of the game, tennis action has been gung-ho on the professional front. The first quarter of the season featuring hard-court action have made a segue to the naturally-occurring clay, both of the red, and as seen in Charleston, of the green variety.

On-court action, however, has not been the sole determiner of discussions about the twists and turns of the circuit. Most specifically, this aspect pertains to the men’s side of the game with the Association of Tennis Professionals (ATP) trying to slot in pop-culture references to bookmark the winding of the season on social media, especially on Twitter.

The results of this initiative remain mixed. The picture the ATP created – and used – to talk about the clay season, which borrowed from the Netflix series Stranger Things brought out tennis fandom en masse. What started off as an innocuous shout out seemed to take a cacophonous turn as Rafael Nadal’s fans objected to the marginalised depiction of their favourite in the picture. Which, thus, forced the ATP to pull it down – delete the tweet – and come up with another picture with the size of the players in the image and their positions visibly altered to soothe and placate the ones who were miffed.

On the other hand, even with this episode not having died down entirely, the ATP came up with another gimmicky creation. This time, of using Game of Thrones as a metaphor for the fight for the year-end top-spot of the men’s singles rankings. There was one picture of Novak Djokovic released as a White Walker/Night King, followed by a depiction of the current top-nine players in the ATP rankings as White Walkers, and a video of GoT’s introductory theme song feat featuring the players, each with a sigil of a House from the Thrones’ saga.

The last bit of creative adaption was undoubtedly fun. Even more so when considered the careful planning that had gone in trying to match each player with the right kind of sigil. Like it was the case for Rafael Nadal who was matched with the Dorne sigil – signifying the Dornish kingdom which was known for its desert, dryness and, sand, with its people’s mettle remaining unbent even at the peak of Aegon Targaryen’s conquest, based on inferences drawn from George RR Martin’s work.

Making use of these TV shows – particularly when it comes to GoT – as a point of correlation forms a good marketing policy not only for the sport which can be perceived as stodgy sometimes but also for the series, too. At the same time, it is not without its pitfalls.

Conceived as ideation of harmless fun, such pick-me-ups become an unnecessary point of conflict with fans taking umbrage as seen in the Stranger Things’ illustration. Removing it and reposting it with alterations, then, only accentuates the unpalatability of what went wrong instead of side-lining it. As yet, there do not seem to be any fall-outs from the ATP’s eager and feverish appropriation of Thrones but that could also be because there are many who do not watch the show – just as there were those who did not understand the hullaballoo about Stranger Things – and therefore, are outliers to the significance of this analogising. Or even if they watch the shows, do not care about them much to be affected by these trivialities.

This, then, is the biggest shortcoming of such social media engagement tactics. That they are niche even as they are fleeting in relevance, unlike the series upon which they are based. That is, while the concept has resonated among a certain section of fans, it would not make much sense even a few months down the line. For one, given the quicksilver-like change in cultural preferences among audiences. Secondly, because some of the players featured here may not even be a part of the race as the year progresses further. Thereby not only restricting the scope of such inventiveness but also giving it an unwanted frivolity.

Does Tennis Feature in the Online Casino Scene?

While tennis may be a hot sport for fans all across the world, we wonder if the sport does indeed feature in the online casino gaming scene. We have noticed a spike in online casino gaming and the main attraction for sporting fans is the live online sports betting category which has been gaining the attention of high stakes punters on some of the biggest sporting events in all of the world. Tennis, not much like football, has been rumoured to be a popular sport amongst online sports bettors, but we wanted to see if tennis did in fact feature in the online casino scene and if so what does this mean for fans and is there a market for wagering on tennis games? We take a look into the world of tennis and find out if it does indeed feature in the online casino gaming scene.

Tennis and Live Casino Betting

Some of the most important sports games are aired, viewed and bet on at online bookie sites. These same sites are home to numerous casino games and lotteries. When it comes to matches of football, ice hockey, basketball and baseball we already know that live sports betting sites open these matches for bets. But are tennis matches aired also?

Surprisingly enough, tennis is in fact one of the more popular sports to place in play bets on. Right next to golf the sport has been capturing the attention of punters since before online gambling became a thing. It wasn’t until recently that online sports books were allowed to operate in certain states, let alone any countries. Now, thanks to modern laws and the evolution of gaming and gambling laws, we are able to not only bet on some of the biggest tennis matches, but we are also able to watch these matches from live sports betting sites. The best sports betting odds are available to you through these sports books, so be sure to check them out.
Tennis and Video Slots Games

Another genre of casino gaming has been video slots which grace both the online and land based casino gaming industry. Video slots are one of the biggest casino attractions as they offer an amazing amount of highly interactive entertainment which can be enjoyed in so many various themes. One of the more popular sporting themes is indeed tennis!

Playtech, one of the online industry’s biggest gaming software developers, has in fact created an alluring tennis themed video slots game which has been a hit since its release in 2011. Now almost a decade later and online casino games are in fact being released based on our most loved and adored sport.

Tennis has to be one of the best sports around and thankfully the casino industry has taken note and made it possible for us fans to enjoy the best matches, make some money off of them and enjoy casino gaming in our spare time. Tennis does indeed feature in the online casino scene.

New Chapter Press Releases Another Tennis Book: “Cattle To Courts: A History of Tennis In Texas”

New Chapter Press announced the release of the book “Cattle to Courts: A History of Tennis In Texas” written by Ken McAllister, long-time Executive Director of the USTA Texas Section.

In this comprehensive volume, anecdotes and personal observations explore how Texas became a leader of America’s “Tennis Boom” through national and international events. In addition to showing how Texas communities and statewide tennis organizations contributed to the sport’s growth, the book highlights the stories of American tennis’ most special characters and personalities. The extremely well versed McAllister shares unique insights from his 50 years in the tennis industry.

“Cattle to Courts” is available for sale and download wherever books are sold, including here on Amazon.com: https://www.amazon.com/dp/1937559904/ref=cm_sw_r_tw_dp_U_x_.4wBCbSQH2Q96

Cliff Richey of San Angelo, Texas, the former U.S. Davis Cup star and winner of the first-ever professional Grand Prix points title in 1970, wrote the Foreword to the book. “There is the saying that “Everything is Bigger in Texas!” This is and always has been the case with tennis,” wrote Richey. “Ken is the perfect guy to write a book about the history of tennis in Texas. He has held many leadership positions that have influenced our state’s success in our great game, most notably as the long-time Executive Director of the USTA Texas Section.”

Said famed ESPN television commentator and member of the International Tennis Hall of Fame Cliff Drysdale, “Cattle to Courts is enjoyable trip down memory lane and a nice historical reference on tennis in Texas. Ken endured exhaustive research for this special project, which, no doubt for him was a labor of love.”

Said Houston, Texas native, Olympic gold medalist and former Wimbledon finalist Zina Garrison, “I love the fact that even though Cattle To Courts covers Texas Tennis History, it is not text book reading… It reads like a novel. Ken has produced a must-read for tennis fans.”

Said Michael Hall with Texas Monthly magazine, “”Nobody knows Texas tennis like Ken McAllister, who for six decades has played, coached, and watched the sport all over the state. Cattle to Courts is full of anecdotes, history, and great details from the only guy to both call a foot-fault on Bobby Riggs and beat Warren Beatty.”

McAllister served the tennis industry for more than 50 years, most notably as the Executive Director of the USTA Texas Section for 24 years, more than doubling tennis membership and staff during his tenure. He started his long association with tennis in 1967 when he became an officer for the Texas Tennis Coaches Association and its President from 1971-74. He also served as Director of Tennis at Walden on Lake Conroe, Lakeside Country Club in Houston, and Lakeway World of Tennis in Austin. He also is a long-time member and contributor to the USPTA, serving as a Texas division president from 1977-79. He has been inducted into the Texas Tennis Coaches Hall of Fame (2000), Snyder High School Athletic Hall of Fame (2010), Southwestern University Athletic Hall of Fame (2013), and the Texas Tennis Hall of Fame (2012).

Founded in 1987, New Chapter Press (www.NewChapterMedia.com) is also the publisher of “The Greatest Tennis Matches of All-Time” by Steve Flink, “The Education of a Tennis Player” by Rod Laver with Bud Collins, “The Secrets of Spanish Tennis” by Chris Lewit, “The Bud Collins History of Tennis” by Bud Collins, “The Wimbledon Final That Never Was” by Sidney Wood, “Titanic: The Tennis Story” by Lindsay Gibbs, “Macci Magic: Extracting Greatness From Yourself And Others” by Rick Macci with Jim Martz, “Andy Murray, Wimbledon Champion: The Full Extraordinary Story” by Mark Hodgkinson, “Sport of a Lifetime: Enduring Personal Stories From Tennis” by Judy Aydelott, “Trojan Tennis: A History of the Storied Men’s Tennis Program at the University of Southern California” by S. Mark Young, “Absolute Tennis: The Best And Next Way To Play The Game” by Marty Smith, “How To Permanently Erase Negative Self Talk So You Can Be Extraordinary” by Emily Filloramo, “Acing Depression: A Tennis Champion’s Toughest Match” by Cliff Richey and Hilaire Richey Kallendorf, “Your Playbook For Beating Depression: Essential Strategies For Managing and Living with Depression” by Cliff Richey and Mary Garrison, “Roger Federer: Quest for Perfection” by Rene Stauffer, “The Days of Roger Federer” by Randy Walker, “Jan Kodes: A Journey To Glory From Behind The Iron Curtain” by Jan Kodes with Peter Kolar, “Tennis Made Easy” by Kelly Gunterman, “On This Day In Tennis History” by Randy Walker, “A Player’s Guide To USTA League Tennis” by Tony Serksnis, “Court Confidential: Inside The World Of Tennis” by Neil Harman, “A Backhanded Gift” by Marshall Jon Fisher, “Boycott: Stolen Dreams of the 1980 Moscow Olympic Games” by Tom Caraccioli and Jerry Caraccioli (www.Boycott1980.com), “Internet Dating 101: It’s Complicated, But It Doesn’t Have To Be” by Laura Schreffler, “How To Sell Your Screenplay” by Carl Sautter, “Bone Appetit: Gourmet Cooking For Your Dog” by Suzan Anson, “The Rules of Neighborhood Poker According to Hoyle” by Stewart Wolpin among others.

Analyzing The New Davis Cup Format’s First Weekend

by Rajagopalan Rohinee

A lot had been said about the reinvention of the Davis Cup when the discussions surrounding its reformatting raged in 2018. Across 1st-2nd February when the Davis Cup qualifiers were played for the first time, one finally got to see how the new format would pan out.

In the end, it became a guiding point illustrating how abruptly the results came about and how hurriedly the ties would end, from here on.

To elaborate with statistical context, three of the 12 ties – Brazil versus Belgium, Germany versus Hungary and Colombia versus Sweden – were determined in straight sets. Of the remaining nine ties, merely 20 rubbers went the distance to three sets. Within these rubbers that were played as best-of-three, eight were played in doubles. Germany versus Hungary was the only tie where only singles rubbers were played as best-of-three: the first singles rubber between Philipp Kohlschreiber and Zsombor Piros, and the second reverse-single rubber between Philipp Kohlschreiber and David Szintai. Moreover, across all ties, there were no upsets and the favourites ruled the roost.

The latter facet is the biggest differentiator between the past and present editions of the Davis Cup. Previously, the longer, best-of-five format gave the players enough room to try and eke out a comeback in a rubber, even when trailing by two sets. Not only for the unseeded teams and their players but especially for the higher-ranked players susceptible to nerves that were unique to the tournament.

Bluntly put, quantitative measurement of time – spent on the court – had brushed aside qualitative memories. And while this happened, opinions that were divided on the efficacy of the changes made to the tournament’s format – in terms of quality versus quantity (of time) – continued to remain diverged, both before and after the ties.

In the press conference after Italy’s 3-1 routing of India, Andreas Seppi said, “For me, I think it’s better to play shorter matches. The format is okay, and also in two days maybe it gives me more time to go to the next tournament if you want to play. Davis Cup (has) had a lot of tradition over 100 years, and sometimes changes are good and sometimes not.” On the other hand, while his team did him proud by winning all four rubbers it played in straight sets, Australian captain Lleyton Hewitt did not hesitate to call out Gerard Pique, the ardent promoter and investor of the revamped tournament in one of his press conferences, before the start of the qualifiers.

“Now we’re getting run by a Spanish football player, which is like me come out and asking to change things for the Champions League. He knows nothing about tennis,” said Hewitt. The former world no. 1’s observations extended his vocal criticism on a development he has regarded as interference to the continuity of the tournament. But where Hewitt’s stance remained unchanged – there were those who preferred to adopt a wait-and-watch approach with regard to the format’s effectiveness in the November finals. Like Simone Bolelli, who admitted, “This format obviously is different but for us this tie was good. I think sometimes it is good, sometimes it is not. But we have to try (in the final) and we will see.”

Bolelli’s measured words offer much-needed pragmatism as to how things would change for Italy, and for several other qualifiers, in the finals in Madrid. Where, they would have been reduced to relative underdogs across the finals’ week from being the favourites one weekend.

To that end, the illusion of open-endedness of the tournament created by the truncated results in the qualifiers stands to come to an end during the finals’ week. Because, the redesigned format endeavours to reward a team whose players are better-suited to the shortened game than to displays of consistency and endurance. And, to the detriment of those with vested interests in the re-imagined tournament, this further restricts its already-narrowed scope.

Mardy Fish Named New U.S. Davis Cup Captain

The USTA today announced that former world No. 7 and Davis Cup veteran Mardy Fish has been named the new captain of the U.S. Davis Cup Team. He succeeds Jim Courier to become the 41st captain in the team’s 120-year history and will make his debut at the newly transformed Davis Cup by BNP Paribas Finals November 18-24 in Madrid, Spain.

“Ever since I started playing professionally and started understanding what the Davis Cup was and how special it was, even as a player, I wanted to be the Davis Cup Captain,” Fish said. “I just thought that position was so special – leading the guys and leading the team, building relationships and the team aspect around it. I’m a team-sport athlete stuck in an individual sport, and I love the team aspect of Davis Cup. To even be considered, let alone named the Captain, is incredibly humbling.”

In this new era of Davis Cup, the role of Captain will be expanded, with the position working more closely with USTA Player Development throughout the year, as well as traveling to multiple tournaments and camps to support American players, serving as a mentor for American pros and juniors. He will also ensure the U.S. Davis Cup team remains a strong platform to grow the game through the USTA’s Net Generation youth initiative.

“Mardy Fish embodies all of the qualities of a successful Davis Cup Captain and will be an invaluable asset to Team USA,” said USTA Chairman of the Board and President Patrick Galbraith. “His achievements as a player both on tour and in Davis Cup are renowned, and his acumen for the game is as strong as his relationships with our American players. There are few people in tennis as qualified to lead the U.S. Davis Cup Team into the next decade, and we cannot wait to see what that future has in store under Mardy’s leadership.”

Fish, 37, reached the singles quarterfinals at three of the four Grand Slams and won a combined 14 ATP titles (six singles, eight doubles) before retiring from playing at the 2015 US Open. He also produced a number of signature performances while representing his country, earning the singles silver medal at the 2004 Athens Olympics and writing his name in the U.S. Davis Cup record book.

Fish played in 11 Davis Cup ties for the U.S. from 2002-12 and is still the last U.S. Davis Cup player to win three live matches in a single tie, in a 3-1 World Group Playoff win in Colombia in 2010 that kept alive the U.S.’s now-record uninterrupted streak in the World Group. Fish’s two singles victories in that tie were five-setters, and he and Courier are the only U.S. Davis Cup players to win two five-set matches in the same tie. In his last Davis Cup playing appearance, Fish beat Stan Wawrinka in five sets and teamed with Mike Bryan to beat Wawrinka and Roger Federer in a 5-0 sweep of Switzerland in the 2012 First Round.

After retiring in 2015, Fish worked part-time as a coach with USTA Player Development, helping to guide young Americans on tour, including Taylor Fritz and Jared Donaldson, through 2017.

Founded in 1900, Davis Cup by BNP Paribas is the World Cup of Tennis and is the largest annual international team competition in sport, with approximately 135 nations competing each year. The U.S. leads all nations with 32 Davis Cup titles. The U.S. holds a 219-72 all-time Davis Cup record, and owns the longest uninterrupted run in the World Group, dating back to 1989. For more information, including access to player and historical Davis Cup records, please go to www.usta.com/daviscup or www.daviscup.com.

The Curious Case of Sam Querrey

by Bob Stockton

2017 seemed like it was going to be a transformative year in Sam Querrey’s career, marking the reinvention of an inconsistent outsider as a player with genuine designs on reaching a Grand Slam final. The American delivered career-best performances at three of the four Grand Slams. Admittedly, reaching the third round of the Australian Open for the fifth time but failing to progress further is nothing to write home about, but a first Slam semi-final at Wimbledon followed by a first quarter-final at the US Open made 2017 a very good year for Querrey.

Querrey has always had the potential to beat anyone when at his peak level. There are players in the top 20 who are more consistent but lack the ability to reach a higher plane on occasion, with the likes of Pablo Carreno Busta, David Goffin and Roberto Bautista Agut all distinguished players but the kind of performers who could feasibly play their best against the world number 1 and still lose. There are other players in the top 20 who have mercurial talent and can be unstoppable for sets and matches at a time, such as the maverick Fabio Fognini and the erratic Grigor Dimitrov.

Querrey fits into that category, with his form at Wimbledon an indictment of this. In 2016, Querrey stunned world number 1 Novak Djokovic in the third round, with the American considered a massive outsider but able to reach a new level. If that wasn’t enough, Querrey repeated this feat the following year by beating home favourite and world number 1 Andy Murray in the Wimbledon quarter-final. Admittedly, there were question marks over both Djokovic’s and Murray’s fitness, but often those players can use their intimidating aura to grind through and exploit opponents’ weakness. Querrey played like a man possessed, possessed by a better tennis player than usual.

There are two key elements to consider when analysing if a player can win a Grand Slam for the first time: can they beat the best, and do they have the resilience to deliver a good level for a fortnight? A look at the latest tennis odds with bet365 for the US Open sees Querrey priced at 80/1 to win the title, a price that reflects that his ability to beat the best is currently outweighed by question marks over his consistency. This is why John Isner is at a much shorter price of 40/1, with Querrey’s fellow big-serving American much more dependable.

For example, Isner is less likely to lose to a player ranked outside the top 300 when defending a title. This is what Querrey served up at Los Cabos, falling to rank outsider Egor Gerasimov in the round of sixteen in a tournament at which he arrived as reigning champion. Querrey has endured a tough 2018. After winning the first set at the French Open against Gilles Simon, Querrey promptly rolled over. He repeated this feat at Wimbledon against Gael Monfils, made all the more disappointing considering his form in London.

Querrey may have given the world one of the great tennis-related videos through his dancing skills, but he will be determined to discover if he can give the sport one of the great Grand Slam final performances. If he can bring his best to the US Open this year then he will strike fear into the tournament favourites. The signs don’t necessarily suggest that this is too likely at this stage, but that’s the thing with mercurial talents: there’s no telling when they’ll bring their best.

Has Genie Bouchard’s Magic Run Out at Only 24?

by Bob Stockton

Eugenie Bouchard’s Swiss Open came to a premature end when injury meant she had to retire from her semi-final match against Alize Cornet. Bouchard had lost the opening set but couldn’t carry on in the second where she was trailing 1-0 after a groin injury forced her off the court. It was the furthest Bouchard had got in any tournament over the last 18 months so there will be feelings of hope but also disappointment from her fans.

After the turbulent few years Bouchard has had, winning the Swiss Open would have done her the world of good. Her withdrawal from the event is another let down in a career that has been blighted by disappointment over recent years. Looking at Bouchard’s career it’s hard to say whether she still has the desire to get to the top after she promised so much early on.

The world looked at her feet after she made it through to the Wimbledon final in 2014 at the age of twenty and despite being thrashed by Petra Kvitova in 55 minutes there was still reason to be positive about the future. The next few years would see her tumble down the rankings from fifth in the world in 2014 to 123rd as of July 2018.
Her young career hasn’t been without controversy either after a fall in a locker room during the 2015 US Open led to her suffering from a concussion and missing the rest of the season. Bouchard took the USTA to court and sued for missed earnings over that time and a jury apportioned 75% of the blame to the USTA meaning Bouchard earned a multimillion-dollar payout.

Rather tellingly Bouchard has requested that her social media posts be kept out the trial as they ‘painted a misleadingly sunny portrait of her life since the injury.’ The request was denied by the judge but in many ways, it does sum up the contentious issue hovering over Bouchard’s career.

Bouchard is somewhat of an Instagram star as she provides daily updates to the 1.7 million followers she has of her lavish lifestyle and that has fans questioning how focused she is on winning. On the way back from the Swiss Open she posted pictures onboard a private plane drinking prosecco and some will be wondering what there was to toast after another tournament of not making a final or winning. You couldn’t imagine the true champions of the sport like Serena Williams, Roger Federer or Rafa Nadal taking any delight whatsoever in that sort of outcome.

Could it be that Bouchard has found the extra gear that has been missing and feels that she is good enough to climb towards the top of the women’s game again? Time will tell but there wouldn’t be a better place to make a statement then the US Open in August. Many would have written Bouchard off and at 150/1 in tennis betting to win the US Open it’s easy to see why but at only 24 she still has a lot left to give and has proved in the past that she is more than capable of mixing it with the very best.

Of late Bouchard has turned in mediocre performance after mediocre performance but has still earned $234,353 on tour this year which makes up part of her on-court career earnings of $5,950,874. You don’t have to be a critical thinker to match the dots up quite easily when wondering where Bouchard’s lack of desire may be coming from after assessing her financial returns so far.

Bouchard’s magic hasn’t run out but it looks like she isn’t willing to give as much of it in the pursuit to get to the top again. Genie is obviously a very talented tennis player but until she commits herself completely to the cause again she will keep rubbing tennis fans up the wrong way.

The 2018 US Open Tennis Championships Is The 50th Anniversary As A Pro Event – Here’s How You Can Get Tickets

The 2018 US Open marks the 50th Anniversary of the US Open (open to pros and amateurs), and throughout Fan Week and the Main Draw of the tournament, special recognitions and ceremonies will take place to honor the tradition and history of the event, as well as celebrate its great champions. In addition, the 2018 US Open marks the completion of the Strategic Transformation of the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center with the opening of the new 14,000-seat Louis Armstrong Stadium. In all, the five-year project, which revamped more than 90 percent of the facility, will have incorporated the installation of a retractable roof over Arthur Ashe Stadium, the construction of a new Louis Armstrong Stadium (also with a retractable roof), a new Grandstand, new West Stadium and practice courts, as well as a completely renovated and redesigned southern campus.

The main draw of the 2018 US Open will be held Monday, August 27, through Sunday, September 9, with Arthur Ashe Kids’ Day powered by Net Generation, a full day tennis and music festival for families and children, kicking off the US Open on Saturday, August 25. US Open Fan Week, which kicks off with the US Open Qualifying Tournament on Tuesday, August 21, consists of a series of free events taking place at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center and in the New York area.

Tickets for the 2018 US Open and the Arthur Ashe Kids’ Day powered by Net Generation stadium show can be purchased via:
• USOpen.org and the US Open app
• Ticketmaster.com and the Ticketmaster app
• 1-866-OPEN-TIX

Payment can be made by credit card – American Express is the Official Card of the US Open.

For ticket plan availability, group sales, disabled seating and other US Open information, visit USOpen.org or call 718-760-6363.

The 2018 US Open will feature day sessions beginning at 11:00 a.m. and night sessions beginning at 7:00 p.m. from Monday, August 27 through the quarterfinals on Wednesday, September 5 (Wednesday, September 5 will feature a 12:00 p.m. day session). The Women’s Semifinals are scheduled for 7:00 p.m. on Thursday, September 6 and the Men’s Semifinals for 4:00 p.m. on Friday, September 7. The Women’s Singles Final is scheduled for Saturday, September 8 at 4:00 p.m., and the Men’s Singles Final for 4:00 p.m. on Sunday, September 9.

In 2018, both Arthur Ashe Stadium and the new Louis Armstrong Stadium will hold dedicated day and night sessions. This marks the first time that a second stadium will feature a night session at the US Open. With the new Louis Armstrong Stadium also being equipped with a retractable roof, there will be a larger number of matches played on schedule, regardless of weather conditions.

For the fourth straight year, the US Open will be distributed first-ball to last-ball, live and exclusively across the ESPN family of networks, on ESPN, ESPN2 and ESPN digital platforms. In addition, an hour-long Arthur Ashe Kids’ Day powered by Net Generation special will air at 2:00 p.m. ET on ABC on Sunday, August 26.

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The USTA is the national governing body for the sport of tennis in the U.S. and the leader in promoting and developing the growth of tennis at every level — from local communities to the highest level of the professional game. A not-for-profit organization with more than 655,000 members, it invests 100% of its proceeds in growing the game. It owns and operates the US Open, one of the highest-attended annual sporting events in the world, and launched the US Open Series, linking seven summer WTA and ATP World Tour tournaments to the US Open. In addition, it owns approximately 90 Pro Circuit events throughout the U.S. and selects the teams for the Davis Cup, Fed Cup, Olympic and Paralympic Games. The USTA’s philanthropic entity, the USTA Foundation, provides grants and scholarships in addition to supporting tennis and education programs nationwide to benefit under-resourced youth through the National Junior Tennis & Learning (NJTL) network. For more information about the USTA, go to USTA.com or follow the official accounts on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and Snapchat.

“Trojan Tennis” Book On USC Men’s Tennis Team’s History Now For Sale

“Trojan Tennis: A History of the Storied Men’s Tennis Program at the University of Southern California” by USC men’s tennis historian and Marshall School of Business professor S. Mark Young, the first-ever book about a college tennis program, is now available for sale and download in advance of the 2018 NCAA Tennis Championships.

Published by New Chapter Press, “Trojan Tennis” documents the most successful college tennis program, dating from 1899 through the end of the 2016-17 season. USC tennis legends Stan Smith and Stevie Johnson both contributed forewords to the hardcover book that features interviews with many of the program’s greatest players also including Alex Olmedo, Dennis Ralston, Bob Lutz, Rick Leach, Luke Jensen as well as legendary coaches George Toley, Dick Leach and Peter Smith. While the progress of the team is central, readers will be fascinated by the biographical details of the key figures in each time period, which are enhanced by extensive footnotes drawing from archival materials, including personal letters, scrapbooks, published news stories, and original interviews.
The book is available where books are sold for $27.95, including here on Amazon.com: https://www.amazon.com/dp/1937559823/ref=cm_sw_r_tw_dp_U_x_Uwj6AbAFSMSJN

“We are so lucky Dr. Mark Young found us,” said Peter Smith, the USC men’s tennis coach. “He had a dream to write the story of the USC men’s tennis team. Little did any of us know what a the grand that lay ahead of him. Mark looked into every detail and every character – the story is a great read. He is the perfect person to tell our story and we can’t wait to share it with the world.”

Said former USC coach Dick Leach, “This book on the history of USC tennis is a very heavily researched endeavor by Professor Mark Young who poured through many archives and interviewed scores of Trojans. The result is a truly comprehensive volume about the legacy of USC tennis. Mark has played competitive tennis all of his life and knows the game. I am very glad that he has written this great book so that all of these memories can be forever preserved.”

Said International Tennis Hall of Famer and former Trojan Dennis Ralston, “Even though it has been many years, I still follow SC tennis. Every time the Trojans play the Bruins, I am transported back to the days of our great rivalry. Mark Young’s book brings back so many wonderful memories and I will always treasure my time as a Trojan at USC.”

Said Bob Lutz, former NCAA singles and doubles champion for USC, “Many of my best tennis memories occurred while I was playing for USC under Coach George Toley. I was very proud to be on teams that would be the first to win four consecutive NCAA Team Championships. My contribution to the history of USC tennis, though, is just part of a much larger story and thanks to Mark Young’s Trojan Tennis, the entire history has now been captured I highly recommend this book.”

Said two-time U.S. Open champion Tracy Austin, whose son Brandon plays for USC, “Trojan Tennis is the only comprehensive book about college tennis. As someone who has been a life-long devotee to tennis, I was only aware of parts of SC tennis history. I am so glad that Mark Young has been able to capture recollections of so many luminaries of the sport. The book is a fun read with amazing photos and I know tennis and sports fans everywhere will thoroughly enjoy it.”

S. Mark Young, Ph.D. holds the George Bozanic and Holman G. Hurt Chair in Sports and Entertainment Business at the Marshall School of Business, University of Southern California. He is the official historian of the USC Men’s Tennis Team, and chairs the university’s Oversight Committee on Athletic Academic Affairs, an organization that reviews and suggests policies and procedures to facilitate the academic progress of all student athletes at USC. A former Division III collegiate player, Young captained the tennis team at Oberlin College in Ohio in the mid-1970s.

Founded in 1987, New Chapter Press (www.NewChapterMedia.com) is also the publisher of “The Secrets of Spanish Tennis” by Chris Lewit, “The Greatest Tennis Matches of All-Time” by Steve Flink, “The Education of a Tennis Player” by Rod Laver with Bud Collins, “Andy Murray, Wimbledon Champion: The Full Extraordinary Story” by Mark Hodgkinson, “The Bud Collins History of Tennis” by Bud Collins, “The Wimbledon Final That Never Was” by Sidney Wood, “Titanic: The Tennis Story” by Lindsay Gibbs, “Sport of a Lifetime” by Judy Aydelott, “Macci Magic: Extracting Greatness From Yourself And Others” by Rick Macci with Jim Martz, “Absolute Tennis: The Best And Next Way To Play The Game” by Marty Smith, “Roger Federer: Quest for Perfection” by Rene Stauffer, “The Days of Roger Federer” by Randy Walker, “Jan Kodes: A Journey To Glory From Behind The Iron Curtain” by Jan Kodes with Peter Kolar, “Acing Depression: A Tennis Champion’s Toughest Match” by Cliff Richey and Hilaire Richey Kallendorf, “Tennis Made Easy” by Kelly Gunterman, “On This Day In Tennis History” by Randy Walker (www.TennisHistoryApp.com), “A Player’s Guide To USTA League Tennis” by Tony Serksnis, “Court Confidential: Inside The World Of Tennis” by Neil Harman, “A Backhanded Gift” by Marshall Jon Fisher, “Boycott: Stolen Dreams of the 1980 Moscow Olympic Games” by Tom Caraccioli and Jerry Caraccioli (www.Boycott1980.com), “How To Permanently Erase Negative Self Talk So You Can Be Extraordinary” by Emily Filloramo, “Internet Dating 101: It’s Complicated, But It Doesn’t Have To Be” by Laura Schreffler, “How To Sell Your Screenplay” by Carl Sautter, “Bone Appetit: Gourmet Cooking For Your Dog” by Suzan Anson, “The Rules of Neighborhood Poker According to Hoyle” by Stewart Wolpin among others.