tennis career

Rogers Cup: Novak Djokovic speaks

Appearing to be quite well rested and in good humor as well, new world number one Novak Djokovic met with the press in Montreal to do some pre-tournament coverage for the Rogers Cup.

Limited by time constraints to only a few questions, it was tough to get in-depth with the Serbian star. He did briefly touch upon life as the top player in the world and his outlook on the first big summer event leading up to the U.S. Open.

Djokovic sounded quite level-headed about his new status at the top of the rankings. When asked how it might change him he replied, “Well I try not to change anything in particular, I’ve tried to keep the things very simple the way I have practiced and the way I have approached my tennis career in general up to the moment where I was number one. And from this moment was the same. So, it is true that some things change. The world is maybe treating me differently but I treat myself and my team exactly the same.”

It’s obviously too soon to really say how his new status might affect him since he has yet to play any tournaments since reaching the pinnacle of the sport. It will be very interesting to watch how he handles himself now that there is a giant target painted to his back. Even though he has been ranked in the top-three for what seems like an eternity, there’s a different twist to being above everyone else.

The scrum got a bit of a laugh when Djokovic was asked if it was difficult to stay on top. The poor guy hasn’t even had a chance to defend any points since he took the pole position from Nadal.

“That is something that I will find out,” he said with a grin, “and hopefully that I can stay as long as I can. I will try to go the distance but it’s definitely not going to be easy.”

Djokovic did not reveal too many specifics when I asked him about his post-Wimbledon celebrations but did mention that he found the time to celebrate, “in the Serbian way.” What does this actually mean? For Djokovic it meant, “A lot of fun, a lot of dancing and things like that.”

After building so much momentum over the first six months of the season, Novak talked about how the five week post-Wimbledon break might affect his progression in a season that has seen him go a remarkable 48-1. He chose to focus on the positive in his answer instead of dwelling on how it might bring him back down to earth.

“Well look, you know, I think the break came at the right time for me and for most of the top players. We’ve had an exhausting six months of the year, especially myself. I’ve played so many matches and I was very successful, I cannot complain, you know, but right now I have recharged my batteries and I am ready for the upcoming couple of months.”

With a first round bye and the forecast calling for steady rain in Montreal for the next few days, it might not be until Wednesday before we see how the time off has treated Novak’s game. He opens against the winner of Nikolay Davydenko and a qualifier.

One last bit of Novak info is that he did reveal that he will be entered in the doubles draw with fellow Serb Janko Tipsarevic. There will not be a repeat of last year’s partnership with Nadal as their rivalry has truly risen to another level in 2011.

Roger Federer In Paperback

NEW YORK, June 29, 2010 – – ROGER FEDERER: QUEST FOR PERFECTION, the updated and re-released book that chronicles the incredible tennis career of Roger Federer, has been officially re-released in paperback by publisher New Chapter Press.

ROGER FEDERER: QUEST FOR PERFECTION ($19.95, New Chapter Press, www.NewChapterMedia.com) was written by Rene Stauffer, the esteemed Swiss tennis journalist who has covered Federer since the budding tennis champion was a 15-year-old. The book chronicles Federer’s life as a tempermental junior player, his early struggles on the ATP Tour, his break-out win at Wimbledon in 2003 through his record-breaking 15th major singles title at Wimbledon in 2009. The book also focuses on his values, how he has been marketed, his relationship with the media as well as his numerous charitable pursuits.

Federer made his statement for being considered as the greatest tennis player of all-time in 2009 when he defeated Andy Roddick 5-7, 7-6 (6), 7-6 (5), 3-6, 16-14 to win his sixth Wimbledon singles title and capture his 15th major singles title, surpassing the all-time men’s record of 14 set by Pete Sampras. Four weeks earlier, Federer defeated Robin Soderling 6-1, 7-6 (1), 6-4 to win the French Open, moving him into exclusive company as only the sixth man to complete a “Career Grand Slam” – winning all four major tournaments over a career. Federer’s major trophy mantle, that now numbers 16, currently includes the 2009 French Open title, six Wimbledon titles (2003-2007, 2009), five U.S. Open titles (2004-2008) and four Australian Open titles (2004, 2006, 2007, 2010).

Stauffer is one of the world’s leading tennis journalists and the highly-respected tennis correspondent for Zurich’s Tages-Anzeiger and Sonntags-Zeitung. A sports writer since 1981, Stauffer worked for the Swiss newspapers Blick and Sport, before joining Tages-Anzeiger in 1993. After first writing about Federer in 1996, Stauffer has traveled the world covering Federer and his many triumphs.

New Chapter Press is also the publisher of “The Bud Collins History of Tennis” by Bud Collins, “The Education of a Tennis Player” by Rod Laver with Bud Collins, “Boycott: Stolen Dreams of the 1980 Moscow Olympic Games” by Tom and Jerry Caraccioli, “Acing Depression: A Tennis Champion’s Toughest Match” by Cliff Richey and Hilaire Richey Kallendorf, “Jan Kodes: A Journey To Glory From Behind The Iron Curtain” by Jan Kodes, “The Lennon Prophecy” by Joe Niezgoda, “Bone Appetit, Gourmet Cooking For Your Dog” by Susan Anson, “The Rules of Neighborhood Poker According to Hoyle” by Stewart Wolpin, “People’s Choice Cancun – Travel Survey Guidebook” by Eric Rabinowitz and “Weekend Warriors: The Men of Professional Lacrosse” by Jack McDermott, among others. Founded in 1987, New Chapter Press is an independent publisher of books and part of the Independent Publishers Group. More information can be found at www.NewChapterMedia.com.

MURRAY REPEATS WIMBLEDON COMEBACK

By Melina Harris

At two sets to love down to Richard Gasquet in the first round of the French Open on a balmy court Suzanne Lenglen Monday, Andy Murray must have taken heart from his thrilling comeback against the young Frenchman at Wimbledon in 2008, when at two sets to love down, Centre Court erupted as he fought back valiantly to win the match in an epic five set battle, only to be annihilated by eventual winner Rafael Nadal.

After being wiped out by Gasquet’s penetrating backhand in the first two sets, Murray managed to claw his way back with some impressive defensive tennis after his opponent began to show visible signs of fatigue following his impressive title victory against Fernando Verdasco last Saturday in Nice. Gasquet had requested more recovery time, but his appeal was declined, much to Murray’s favor who capitalized in the final three sets to win, 4-6, 6-7, 6-4, 6-2, 6-1, completing the victory with an ace into the corner of the advantage court. Gasquet was reflective after the match; “He [Murray] is always fighting, fighting, putting the balls in the court. Even if he is not playing so good, it is very tough to beat him.”

Once the game went into a fifth set, statistically there was only ever going to be one winner; for Andy Murray had won six of his previous seven five set matches, while Richard Gasquet had lost a miserable eight out of his past nine. The match lasted a lengthy 4 hours and 4 minutes, causing Murray’s troublesome knee to flare up after the match, which needed intensive icing. The world No. 4 has a bipartite patella (a split right knee cap) which he will have to cope with for the rest of his tennis career. Murray said after the match, “My [right] knee is sore, a four-hour match probably wasn’t the best thing for it. I have to manage the problems as best I can.  It hurts at different times of the year and there is nothing I can do about it because it was just something I was born with and I am going to have to deal with it for the rest of my career. It’s a lot worse than people think and hurts for the majority of the year.”

His knee issue is not the only problem he will have to overcome to continue further into the tournament, his low first serve percentage, delivering just 46 percent against Gasquet will have to be improved as it exposes a second serve that everyone in the game is well aware lacks penetration; a weakness that the clay court specialists will inevitably pounce on with devastating accuracy. However, Murray was brimming with confidence when asked about his second round clash with Juan Ignacio Chela, the Argentine he beat in straight sets in Madrid last week, stating “Chela is a very good player but I feel good going into the match and will be confident.”  He has an impressive one hundred percent record against the Argentine, winning each of the five encounters between the pair, so Murray can afford to go into the second round with a positive frame of mind, while British fans will still undoubtedly be holding their breath!

Melina Harris is a freelance sports writer, book editor, English tutor and PTR qualified tennis coach. For more information and contact details please visit and subscribe to her website and blog at http://www.thetenniswriter.wordpress.com and follow her twitter updates via http://www.twitter.com/thetenniswriter.   She is available for freelance writing, editing and one to one private teaching and coaching.

JIMMY CONNORS WRITES FOREWORD TO CLIFF RICHEY BOOK “ACING DEPRESSION”

NEW YORK, N.Y. – Jimmy Connors, the five-time U.S. Open champion, has contributed the Foreword to the upcoming book “ACING DEPRESSION: A TENNIS CHAMPION’S TOUGHEST MATCH” written by his friend and former pro tennis colleague Cliff Richey.

Richey, who 40 years ago was the No. 1-ranked American tennis player and the hero of the 1970 championship-winning U.S. Davis Cup team, was the winner of the first-ever professional Grand Prix points title. In his book, due out in April, he discusses the most difficult opponent of his life, depression. Richey calls depression among adult males as “the silent tragedy in our culture today” and details his life-long battle with the disease that afflicts approximately 121 million people around the world. Co-written with his oldest daughter Hilaire Richey Kallendorf, ACING DEPRESSION ($19.95, New Chapter Press, www.NewC

hapterMedia.com), profiles the life and tennis career of Richey, with his depression being a constant theme.

Writes Connors in the Foreword, “What made Cliff Richey what he was on the tennis court has certainly carried over into this book. His story has taken a subject, depression—which has affected him personally—and put it out there for everyone to see. Depression has been a subject that no one really talks about. Few people even admit to having such a condition. But Cliff is not afraid to be bold and reveal what he has gone through and what it takes to get a handle on this disease…Just as Cliff played tennis, he is studying how depression works; what its weaknesses are; and what strategies you can use against it. His hope is that people who read his story can learn—learn about the disease and learn that people who suffer can have a better quality of life. Things can get better. There is hope.”

Richey was known as the original “Bad Boy” of tennis, before there was John McEnroe and Ilie Nastase. His 26-year career was highlighted by a 1970 season where he led the United States to the Davis Cup title, finished as the first-ever Grand Prix world points champion and won one of the most exciting matches in American tennis history that clinched the year-end No. 1 American ranking. He won both of his singles matches in the 5-0 U.S. victory over West Germany in the 1970 Davis Cup final, while he beat out rivals Rod Laver, Ken Rosewall, Arthur Ashe and Stan Smith to win the first-ever Grand Prix world points title the precursor to the modern day ATP rankings. He won his second U.S. Men’s Clay Court Championships in 1970, while also won titles in his career at the Canadian Open, the South African Open, the U.S. Indoors and the Western Open (modern day Cincinnati Masters 1000 event).

At the 1970 Pacific Coast Championships at the Berkeley Tennis Club in Berkeley, Calif., he earned the No. 1 U.S. ranking when he beat Smith in a fifth-set tie-breaker, where both players had simultaneous match point in a sudden-death nine-point tie-breaker at 4-4. He also reached the semifinals of both the 1970 French and U.S. Opens, losing a famous match to Zeljko Franulovic of Yugoslavia in the French semifinals, despite holding match points and leading by two-sets-to-one and 5-1 in the fourth set.

ACING DEPRESSION is due out in April and is published by New Chapter Press – also the publisher of The Roger Federer Story, Quest for Perfection by Rene Stauffer, The Bud Collins History of Tennis by Bud Collins, The Education of a Tennis Player by Rod Laver with Bud Collins, Boycott: Stolen Dreams of the 1980 Moscow Olympic Games by Tom Caraccioli and Jerry Caraccioli, The Lennon Prophecy by Joe Niezgoda, Bone Appetit, Gourmet Cooking For Your Dog by Susan Anson, The Rules of Neighborhood Poker According to Hoyle by Stewart Wolpin, People’s Choice Cancun – Travel Survey Guidebook by Eric Rabinowitz and Weekend Warriors: The Men of Professional Lacrosse by Jack McDermott, among others. Founded in 1987, New Chapter Press is an independent publisher of books and part of the Independent Publishers Group. More information can be found at www.NewChapterMedia.com.

THE FRIDAY FIVE: IVANOVIC THE NEW FRAULEIN FOREHAND?

By Maud Watson

The New Fraulein Forehand? – A couple of weeks ago I criticized Serb Ana Ivanovic for appearing to disrupt the balance by focusing on too many off court activities while her tennis career was in a fast downward spiral. Today I must applaud her for once again seeking a full time coach, and a good one at that. Ivanovic has hired Steffi Graf’s former coach Heinz Gunthardt. Granted, each individual player has his or her own strengths and weaknesses, but given the champion player that Steffi Graf evolved into under the tutelage of Gunthardt, there’s reason to believe that Ivanovic may soon find her game back on track.

Career Resurrected – Nearly 7 years ago, Spaniard Juan Carlos Ferrero was on top of the world. He’d won Roland Garros, reached the finals of the US Open, and achieved the No. 1 ranking. Then, a bad bout of chicken pox and other miscellaneous injuries saw his ranking fall off the map. Nearly the forgotten man, it would be 6 years before he’d break his title drought with a tournament win at Casablanca in 2009. After a shaky start to 2010, El Mosquito has won Brasil and Buenos Aires back-to-back and has put in a good showing in Acapulco. His ranking is now in the top 20, with a realistic chance of being inside the top 10 for Roland Garros. It’s nice to see his hard work pay off, and maybe, just maybe, he’ll add another Slam to his resume before he hangs up the racquet.

Shakin’ with Shakira – While allowing his knee to recuperate, Rafael Nadal had a bit of fun making it on the small screen. The famous Spaniard teamed up with Colombian pop sensation Shakira to shoot a steamy music video for her new single Gypsy, which will be out this coming April. Don’t let too many tongues start wagging, however. Both are in long-term relationships and deny that there is anything going on between the two of them.

Cautious Federer – It’s rare to see the Swiss maestro pull out of an event due to injury or illness, but that’s exactly what Roger Federer was forced to do at Dubai this week. The 16-time Grand Slam winner is suffering from a lung infection. He hopes to be back at Indian Wells, but he’s making no promises. You can’t argue with Federer’s cautious approach. After all, part of what has allowed him to build such a stellar legacy is his relative good health and lack of injuries over the course of his career. That doesn’t happen by accident. He’s nearly always been excellent in setting his schedule and recognizing when his body needs to rest. This time is no exception.

Tomic Makes the Team – Due to a combination of his improving results and Hewitt’s unavailability for Davis Cup duty, Aussie Bernard Tomic has now become the youngest player to be named to an Australian Davis Cup squad. There’s no doubt that Tomic has the talent to make it to the top, but his attitude and meddlesome father have caused him more than his share of troubles in his young career. Perhaps a dose of maturity and a good showing for his adopted homeland will do much to improve his image and serve as a springboard to greater success.

ANOTHER JELENA JANKOVIC PICTORIAL!

This is just another Jelena Jankovic pictorial. I mean she amazingly goodlooking and when I found these photos I just had to show you the class and style she possesses offcourt. The way she dresses is definitely class.

I am sure a whole lot of you know the biography of Jelena Jankovic, I figure I skip the less interesting parts for the more juicy parts. Her personal life. Taken straight from the pages of  my best friend next to Starbucks, Wikipedia:

Janković was born in Belgrade, in then Yugoslavia, now Serbia, as the third child of Veselin and Snežana Janković, both economists. Her mother is from Serbia and her father is from Montenegro (Vasojevići clan). She also has two brothers, Marko and Stefan. She is a student at the Megatrend University in Belgrade, studying economics; however, she has put her course of study on indefinite hold as she continues to pursue her tennis career. She trained at tennis club “Crvena Zvezda.”

Janković was the subject of the 2008 autobiographical documentary, Jelenin svet (Jelena’s World),featuring Justine Henin, Svetlana Kuznetsova, Ana Ivanović and other notable players.

The British press have linked Janković and Jamie Murray romantically but she has remained coy about their relationship, though she joked in interviews that she used kisses as a way of motivating the Scot.[3] In September 2008, Janković announced that she has been dating Montenegrian water polo player Mlađan Janović since August 2008.[4] The pair had been dating since the 2008 Summer Olympics.

On December 5, 2007, Janković became a UNICEF National Ambassador for Serbia, for Children’s Fund. “I am happy to have become a UNICEF ambassador for Serbia. This is a great honour for me and I will try to justify the role that has been given to me”, she said. Janković is the second Serbian tennis star to have volunteered to help promote the rights of children and collect funds for UNICEF after Ana Ivanović became an ambassador in September.

Feel free to comment on the pics as usual. That’s what that little box is here for. For you to comment on my articles.

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Harkleroad Wedding Photos

Let’s just say that these photos of Ashley Harkleroad are not quite as interesting as others we have seen of the tennis starlet, but these are photos of her wedding to her coach/manager Chuck Adams. The two tennis aces were married on September 19 in Inglewood Courthouse in Inglewood, Calif. The two have an infant child, Charlie, (born March 30, 2009) who also attended the ceremony.

Harkleroad, 24, was once ranked as high as No. 39 in the world and represented the United States in both Fed Cup and Hopman Cup. She dropped off the circuit in 2009 when she was pregnant with Charlie, but plans to make a comeback in 2010. The tennis tart is best known for posing for Playboy magazine in 2008.

Nicknamed “Pebbles” since she lived in the town of “Flintstone” – a one traffic light town in Northern Georgia – Harkleroad was previously married ATP tennis pro Alex Bogomolov from December 2004 to October 2006.

Adams, 38, was ranked as high as No. 34 in the world and reached three ATP singles finals and reached the fourth round of the 1993 US Open.

Roger Federer’s Clay Court Skills and the “Career Grand Slam”

If Roger Federer is able to win the 2009 French Open, he will complete a “Career Grand Slam” as well as tie Pete Sampras for the all-time men’s record for most major singles titles with 14. Rene Stauffer, the Swiss tennis writer and author of the book The Roger Federer Story, Quest for Perfection (www.rogerfederbook.com, New Chapter Press, $24.95), discussed the “Career Grand Slam” as well as Roger’s clay court skills in the best-selling book, as excerpted below.

Roger Federer lost out on his first opportunity to win a Grand Slam tournament in 2005 after losing to Marat Safin in the semifinals of the Australian Open. The French Open, however, offered him another opportunity for a career milestone-a milestone that only a very select few have achieved-the “Career Grand Slam.” The term stands for winning all four major titles over a tennis career-a feat only achieved by five men in the history of the sport. Rod Laver and Don Budge are the only men who have won a “real” or calendar-year Grand Slam-winning all four major titles in the same year. Budge won the first Grand Slam in 1938, while Laver won a Grand Slam in 1962 as an amateur and then again in 1969 as a professional. Fred Perry of Great Britain clinched his career Grand Slam at the 1935 French Championships, while Roy Emerson of Australia completed his career quartette at Wimbledon in 1964 at age 27. Andre Agassi joined Laver as the only professional players to win a career Grand Slam when he won the French Open in 1999.

For Agassi, as well as for many other great players in the history of the game, the French Open or “Roland Garros” proved to be the toughest nut to crack. It took him 11 attempts and three trips to the championship match until he finally won in Paris. Even in his lucky third appearance in the singles final in 1999, he decisively lost the first two sets to the unseeded Ukrainian Andrei Medvedev before rallying for the five-set victory at age 29-seven years after winning his first Grand Slam tournament title.

Clay court tennis is in some regards a different form of tennis as it requires different footwork-a “sliding-into-the-ball” approach. The clay surface slows the velocity of the ball enough to give players on the defensive just a little more time to save a passed shot that on a faster surface would otherwise be a winner. Changes in temperature as well as variations in humidity levels provide for constantly changing playing conditions. Warm weather dries out clay courts and makes them play faster and favors the more aggressive players than when it is cold and moist, when the courts play much slower and favor the more defensive-minded players.

These extraordinary-and unpredictable-conditions explain why the French Open seems to always have the most unlikely champions of all four of the Grand Slam tournaments. The clay courts and the conditions create an environment where a larger pool of players become potential champions of the event as opposed to Wimbledon or the US Open. Some of the greatest serve-and-volley and aggressive-style players have routinely left Paris defeated. Yannick Noah’s ability to play an aggressive style of play and defeat the defensive clay court style of Mats Wilander in the 1983 French final still seems like a minor miracle.

More than half of the 23 players who were ranked No. 1 in the world rankings entering 2007 do not have a French Open title on their resume. This includes Boris Becker, who reached the semifinals three times, Pete Sampras, who only reached the semifinals on one occasion in 13 attempts, John McEnroe, who lost a painful final to Ivan Lendl in 1984 after a two-sets-to-love lead, and Stefan Edberg, who led Michael Chang two sets to one in the 1989 final before losing. Jimmy Connors, who was either denied entry or did not enter the tournament for many years, is also part of the group of all-time greats without a French title. Other notables on the list include John Newcombe, Arthur Ashe, Patrick Rafter, Marat Safin and Lleyton Hewitt. Although Federer’s professional career began with 11 straight defeats on clay courts, he never allowed himself to become discouraged. In France, where he experienced the least amount of success of the Grand Slam tournaments, Federer constantly made reference to the fact that he grew up on clay courts and that this was “his surface” too. He had after all won three titles on clay at the German Open in Hamburg and proved repeatedly in Davis Cup play that he could compete with anybody on clay courts. However, to date, he was unable to even advance as far as the semifinals at Roland Garros.

Federer may have arrived in Paris with a season’s record of 41-2 but he expressed caution before his seventh French Open. “The first rounds here are always treacherous,” he said in a modest tone that was sometimes missing from previous years. “I’m not thinking about winning this tournament.” He arrived in Paris directly from Portugal and had the privilege of being able to practice every day on the Centre Court at Roland Garros-the Philippe Chatrier Court-where he suffered many of his most devastating losses as a professional. Federer’s excellent pre-event preparation and the tutoring from the now 60-year-old Tony Roche paid off. He won the first five matches of the tournament without dropping a set to reach the semifinals for the first time in his career. “It’s almost going a bit too quickly for me,” he said of his relatively easy jaunt to the semifinals.

However, waiting for Federer in the semifinals was none other than Nadal-whom he faced for the first time on a clay court. The young Spaniard was full of self-confidence and entered the match with a 22-match win streak. Due to a rain delay, as well the five-set match between Argentinean Mariano Puerta and Russian Nikolay Davydenko in the other men’s semifinal, Federer and Nadal did not take the court until 6:20 pm local time in Paris. Federer struggled from the start and was troubled-particularly off the forehand-by Nadal’s extreme topspin. After losing four of the first five games, Federer surrendered the first set 6-3-his first lost set of the tournament-as he had his serve broken an incredible four times. He managed to win the second set 6-4, but remained unusually nervous and committed nearly twice as many mistakes as Nadal in the third set. Nadal led 4-2, before Federer broke back to square the set. After Nadal held in the ninth game of the third set, he clinched the third set-and a two-sets-to-one lead-with a cross-court running forehand winner. Darkness started to fall in Paris and Federer was irritated. He seemed to be in a rush and requested the match be suspended due to darkness. The chair umpire did not allow it. Federer was flustered and Nadal took control of the match as he broke Federer’s serve in the eighth game to take a 5-3 lead and closed out the 6-3, 4-6, 6-4, 6-3 victory one game later. “I started the match off badly and ended it badly,” Federer summarized. “I played well in between but all in all, that was not enough.”

Like at the Australian Open when Federer was defeated by Safin in the wee hours of the morning of Safin’s 25th birthday, Federer was again a birthday victim at a Grand Slam event. This Friday-June 3rd-was the 19th birthday of Nadal-and like Safin-he would go on to win the tournament. In an exciting final between two left-handed players, Nadal defeated Puerta, who, as it turned out months later, tested positive for performance-enhancing drugs and was suspended from professional tennis.

The more time Federer pondered the loss to Nadal, the more positives he drew from it. He proved to himself and others that he had what it takes to win the French Open, despite what he thought was his worst performance in the later stages of a Grand Slam tournament. He was convinced that this loss to Nadal would be a learning experience. He now believed he could win the French Open and achieve the rare career Grand Slam. Another positive to temper his mood was the fact that the French public took a liking to him and rallied behind him during his matches, most notably against Nadal. “It was fantastic how they supported me,” he said. “It was almost like a victory for me because it’s not easy to win the crowd in Paris.”

Since Federer’s semifinal showing was a vast improvement from his third-round loss the year before, his grip on the No. 1 ranking rose to a record 6,980 points-giving him almost twice as many points as the No. 2-ranked Hewitt. Federer nonetheless maneuvered himself into a startling situation. He only lost three matches during the year but he stood empty-handed in Grand Slam titles. If he were to fail at Wimbledon as well, the only opportunity for a title remaining would be the always unpredictable US Open. His statementfrom the previous fall that he would be satisfied in 2005 with just one Grand Slam title suddenly took on new importance.

Alex Bogomolov Named Touring Professional in Residence for Napeague Tennis Club

NEW YORK, May 20 – Alex Bogomolov, the former top 100 touring professional and bronze medalist at the 2003 Pan American Games, was announced today as the Touring Professional in Residence for the Napeague Tennis Club located in the Hamptons area of Long Island. The Napeague Tennis Club, located in a beautiful, serene setting adjacent to Hither Hills State Park in Amagansett, N.Y., opened for the season earlier this month.

 “I am excited to share the elite training and coaching secrets and techniques that I have learned through the years this summer in the Hamptons with Gotham Tennis,” said Bogomolov. “I am very motivated and eager to work with players of all levels. I will give each player a candid, professional assessment of his/her current game and a personalized plan to achieve his or her maximum potential. ”

 Bogomolov, who was ranked as high as No. 97 in 2003, will serve as the club’s resident ATP Touring Pro and will be available to Napeague Tennis Club members for private lessons, clinics and other club events throughout the summer. Bogomolov will provide Napeague club members with the same advanced training and teaching techniques that have been integrated into Gotham Tennis Academy’s Manhattan-based adult and junior programs. Bogomolov brings methods he has learned and utilized throughout his junior and professional tennis career. He has registered wins over Andy Roddick, James Blake, and Tommy Haas, among others in his pro and junior career. In 2003, he won a bronze medal in doubles for the United States at the Pan American Games in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic. At Napeague, he will work alongside Tennis Director Brian Helm to offer a unique blend of engaging tennis programming, lessons and camps this summer.

 The Napeague Tennis Club features four immaculately-maintained clay courts and one multi-purpose grass court. Summer memberships start as low as $950. Napeague club members receive personalized attention from Napeague’s professional staff, unlimited free court usage and savings of ten to thirty percent for private lessons and group clinics. In addition, Napeague offers adult and children’s clinics, day camps, private lessons, and the option of at-home tennis instruction.

 “Napeague Tennis Club is the preferred destination for tennis in the Hamptons because of our outstanding tennis professionals and programs, relaxed, family-friendly atmosphere, beautiful clay courts, and close proximity to the beach. Our Club is also very reasonably-priced,” said Brian Helm, a Director of Tennis for Gotham Tennis Academy in New York City and the new Director of Tennis at Napeague. “The Napeague Tennis Club is a very special place. It’s an oasis of calm with world-class tennis programming and great facilities.”

 The Napeague Tennis Club, located at 2145 Montauk Highway in Amagansett, is entering its second season under the management of Gotham Tennis.

 The mission of Gotham Tennis Academy is to provide friendly, personalized, high-performance tennis instruction in convenient facilities for Manhattan and Hamptons clients. In addition to operating the Napeague Tennis Club in the Hamptons, Gotham Tennis Academy has established a reputation for excellent tennis programming at three Manhattan locations — the Harlem Armory Tennis Center, the Midtown Tennis Club and the Riverside Clay Tennis Association. Gotham Tennis Academy offers tennis programs year-round to players of all ages and skill levels. Gotham Tennis Academy’s goal is to help each player improve all aspects of his or her tennis game. More information on Gotham Tennis Academy can be found at http://www.gothamtennis.com/.