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ROGER FEDERER AND RAFAEL NADAL PICTORIAL AT THE MADRID OPEN

And he does it again. Ralf Reinecke managed to capture two of the best players in the world on cam in Madrid.  Earlier this week an interview with Roger Federer it was like he was giving Rafael Nadal a subtle swipe about his clay court dominance.

The interview was on Gototennis.com and Federer has the following to say:

On clay you don’t need a volley or a serve. You just need legs, an incredible forehand and backhand, and to run after every ball. I’m not trying to take anything from Rafa: He has been successful in other surfaces as well. But on clay you can get away, you can be competitive even with a very incomplete game. I’m not saying it’s so simple, but it’s too easy.

Whether or not Federer is right remains to be seen. Until then I would suggest that you enjoy the pics.

I Don’t Take Wimbledon…Like A Really Important Thing

Marcelo Rios

Who is the biggest villain in Wimbledon history? Chilean Marcelo Rios may get the nod. It was on this day back in 1998 when the former world No. 1 took a swipe at the All England Club and The Championships after being dismissed from the tournament as the No. 2 seed. The match, and Rios’ comments, are documented below in the June 24 chapter of the book ON THIS DAY IN TENNIS HISTORY, which is excerpted below.

1998 – Marcelo Rios of Chile takes a swipe at Wimbledon after being unceremoniously dumped in the first round of the world’s most prestigious tournament as the No. 2 seed. ”I don’t take Wimbledon, like playing on grass, like a really important thing,” says the dour Chilean, seeded No. 2, after losing to No. 36-ranked Francisco Clavet of Spain 6-3, 3-6, 7-5, 3-6, 6-3. ”Tennis, when you see it on grass, it’s not tennis. It’s not a surface to watch or play tennis on; it’s really boring. You just serve, return, go in, that’s it.”  Rios does not return to the All-England Club, never playing the event again after competing for three years – 1995, 1997 and 1998 – with a round of 16 showing in 1997 being his best result.

2003 – Lleyton Hewitt becomes only the second defending men’s singles champion at Wimbledon to lose in the first round as six-foot-10 Croatian qualifier Ivo Karlovic dismisses Hewitt 1-6, 7-6 (5), 6-3, 6-4 at The Championships. Hewitt joins 1966 Wimbledon champion Manuel Santana, defeated in the first round of Wimbledon in 1967 by Charlie Pasarell, as the only defending champions to be dismissed in the first round.

2004 – Forty-seven-year-old nine-time Wimbledon champion Martina Navratilova, in a cameo singles appearance at Wimbledon for the first time since 1994, loses her final singles match at the All England Club on Court No. 3, losing 3-6, 6-3, 6-3 in the second round to 19-year-old Gisela Dulko of Argentina, the same player who ends Navratilova’s French Open singles cameo four weeks earlier. Says Dulko, “This is the most special win of my career.”

1983 – Kathy Jordan upsets Chris Evert Lloyd 6-1, 7-6 (2) in the third round of Wimbledon, marking Evert Lloyd’s first-ever loss before the semifinals at a major event. Evert Lloyd’s semifinal streak, which dates back to her 1971 U.S. Open debut as a 16-year-old, is stopped at 34 consecutive major semifinals. “I’m disappointed,” says Evert Lloyd. “In the past when opponents have been in a winning position against me, they’re usually intimidated. Kathy wasn’t. When I lose a set, it warms me up and gets me started. But at 3-0 in the tie-breaker, I knew, the way she was playing, I was not going to win.”

2004 – Chair umpire Ted Watts performs one of the biggest mistakes in Wimbledon history, famously awarding Croatia’s Karolina Sprem an extra point in a second-set tie-break in her second-round Centre Court upset win over Venus Williams. Sprem leads Williams 2-1 in a second-set tie-break and wins the next point to lead 3-1, but Watts announces the score as 4-1. The mistake escapes both players and neither player protests the incorrect score. Sprem holds to win the tie-break 8-6 and wins the match 7-6 (5), 7-6 (6). Says a diplomatic Williams, “I don’t think one call makes a match.”

2002 – Pete Sampras wins what ultimately becomes his final match at Wimbledon, beating Britain’s Martin Lee 6-3, 7-6 (1), 6-3 in the first round. Says Sampras of the match, also his final appearance on Centre Court at the All England Club, “It’s nice to play on Centre Court. Stepping out there felt like coming home again….It’s like Mecca out there.”

2006 – In a pre-Wimbledon press conference at the All-England Club, thirty-six-year–old Andre Agassi announces that the 2006 tournament will be his last Wimbledon and he will retire from competitive tennis at the 2006 U.S. Open. Says Agassi, “It’s been a long road this year for me, and for a lot of reasons. It’s great to be here. This Wimbledon will be my last, and the U.S. Open will be my last tournament.”

1996 – Andre Agassi, the No. 3 seed and a Wimbledon champion in 1992, is dismissed from the first round of The Championships by No. 281-ranked qualifier Doug Flach 2-6, 7-6 (1), 6-4, 7-6 (6) on the famed “Graveyard” Court, Court No. 2. Says Agassi after the match, “This has nothing to do with Wimbledon. This is just, you know, I came out here and I was one of many guys trying to do well, and I didn’t.” Michael Chang, the No. 6 seed, joins Agassi on the sideline, also losing on the Graveyard Court, falling to Spain’s Albert Costa, 3-6, 7-6 (5), 7-6 (1), 6-4. No. 8 seed Jim Courier is also dismissed in the first round, struggling with a sore leg in his 6-2, 6-4, 2-6, 6-4 loss to former junior doubles partner Jonathan Stark.

1977 – Twenty-two-year-old world No. 1 Chris Evert defeats 14-year-old Wimbledon rookie Tracy Austin 6-1, 6-1 in 49 minutes in the third round of Wimbledon.

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