sam groth

10 Things You Always Wanted To Know About Tennis…

Unusual scoring, loud grunts and ultra-fast serves make tennis a game that’s full of quirks. Read on and learn from Wimbledon Debenture Holders, the top supplier of Wimbledon tickets 2014 (www.wimbledondebentureholders.com), about ten unusual tennis facts.

1. Why are tennis balls green?

Amazingly, tennis balls aren’t actually green. They’re a specific color known as hi-vis yellow. All major tennis tournaments use this color due to its excellent visibility, especially for spectators viewing at home.

2. When was tennis invented?

While there’s some debate as to when the first game of tennis was played, most of the tennis world agrees that the game originated in 12th century France, where it was played using the palm of a player’s hand.

3. How long is a tennis game?

Since tennis games continue based on score, rather than time, they can go on for as long as they need to. The longest tennis game in history was played at Wimbledon 2010, and lasted for 11 hours, five minutes, John Isner defeating Nicolas Mahut.

4. How much of a tennis game is active play?

In a two-hour tennis game, the ball spends less than 30 minutes in play. Most of a tennis game is made up of preparation and rest breaks – the ball is actually in play for less than 20 per cent of the game.

5. Why do tennis players grunt?

Tennis players grunt for two reasons: to let out air after an exhausting and difficult motion, and to distract and ‘psyche out’ their opponents.

6. Why does ‘deuce’ mean a tie?

‘Deuce’ doesn’t technically mean a tie, although many casual tennis players assume so. It actually means ‘two’ – the number of points that a player will need to score in order to win the game.

7. How rich are tennis players?

Tennis appears to be a profitable occupation, at least for the world’s best players. In today’s tennis world, the wealthiest players are Roger Federer and Maria Sharapova, who both have a nine-figure net worth.

8. Who has the fastest serve?

Samuel Groth, an Australian tennis player known for his impressive striking power, is the current service record holder. During the 2012 Busan Open Challenger Tennis Tournament, he served the ball at an incredible 163.4 miles per hour.

9. Why do tennis players check the ball?

Small scuffs on the surface of a tennis ball can affect its play, causing it to fly off in a certain direction or lose its bounce on the surface of the court. Because of this, most players want to avoid using a beaten-up ball during their games.

10. Why does ‘love’ mean zero?

Ever wonder why ‘love’ is used in scoring? Some people believe that it’s because of the French term for zero, which sounds similar to the word for ‘egg.’ Because of the space of the numeral zero, it’s picked up the ‘love’ terminology over the years.

Sights and Sounds Part Deux: Aussie Tennis Player Confessions

By James Crabtree

It really is hard to comprehend how much work goes into staging a grand slam. Everyone is hustling and bustling and breaking into a sweat, from workman in hardhats to stressed out suits. Offices are moving locations, sponsorship boards are being put into place and players are trying secure practice courts or just a comfy seat to rest their weary bones.

Chances are if you ask any of the players playing in the December Showdown, if they have read a book recently, they will say it is ‘Fifty Shades of Grey’. On top of that erotic bombshell, the majority carry five racquets, listen to hard thumping house music and enjoy Will Ferrell movies. Matthew Barton was the true exception claiming an appreciation for Michael J. Fox.

On the courts, the only sound Sam Groth heard during his first match was his own. During much of his loss to the number 4 junior in the world, Nicholas Kyrgios, Groth provided a play by play narrative of his troubles. Kyrgios — who reminded one onlooking coach of a tall David Nalbandian — handled the fastest server in the world with relative ease, proving why he might be a name to be remembered in years to come.

One player to avoid an upset was Greg Jones who came back from two sets to love down to defeat Michael Look 2-6 4-6 7-5 6-4 6-4 in three and a half hours. The last time the very relieved Jones lost a five set match was the 2012 Australian Open, when he was two sets to love up against Alexandr Dolgopolov.

Two-time junior grand slam champion Luke Saville started his campaign with a win over Andrew Whittington that included the longest tie break he had ever played in winning the fourth set. After the match, he was quick to speak on his desire to not only rise up the rankings, but to one day also get the call from Pat Rafter of representing his country for Davis Cup. Based on today’s performance, that call shouldn’t be too far away.

By the way, the weather in Melbourne officially didn’t reach four seasons although it was blustery then hot, hotter and then stinging …

(James Crabtree is currently in Melbourne Park for the December Showdown and giving us the scoop on all the latest news surrounding the Australian Open. Check out his first installment of “Sights and Sounds” here.)