Roland Garros

Ashleigh Barty Now A Grand Slam Champion Following Her Return From A Tennis Hiatus

Australian Ashleigh Barty beat Czech star Marketa Vondrousova in Saturday’s Women’s French Open Singles Final, becoming the first Australian female to win a singles title at Roland Garros since Margaret Court did so in 1973.

The 23-year-old stepped away from tennis to try her hand at professional cricket back in 2014 but returned in 2016, which has proven to be a great choice.

Barty, who went into the final as an 8th seed, bested her opponent 6-1, 6-3 on the Paris clay before sinking to the ground in apparent disbelief. The shock was understandable given the fact that she’d felt a need to quit the game for nearly two years earlier in her career. But she’s certainly returned much stronger.

She’s now set to climb the rankings to second in the world when standings are released next week and, by extension, will be the highest-ranked woman hailing from Australia since Evonne Goolagong Cawley in 1976.

“I never dreamt I’d be sat here with the French Open trophy,” she declared following her near-perfect victory.

On her decision to walk away from tennis in 2014, she said, “I needed time to step away, to live a normal life, because this tennis life certainly isn’t normal.”

“I never closed any doors, saying, ‘I’m never playing tennis again’,” she added.

It has been an amazing climb for the Australian, who started out at 623 after returning from her break. Since coming back, she has won four trophies, including the Miami Open and the US Open doubles. She’s also reached a total of four doubles Grand Slam finals alongside partner Casey Dellacqua.

Barty’s experience shone through when she took on Vondrousova in the French Open final on Saturday as she started out as the aggressor, taking three of nine break points to claim the opening set in just 29 minutes. These were the first Vondrousova had dropped in the entire tournament and Barty would not let go of the advantage after breaking again in the second set then holding off a break point to maintain a service game.

Vondrousova was ranked at 38 ahead of the final but will rise to the top 20 in the rankings in spite of her loss.

The new French Open women’s champion is soon to head to Wimbledon, with the tournament kicking off at the beginning of next month. Betfair has offered odds of +850 on her winning the competition outright and you could find the latest betting tips and the best betting offers, as well as free bets at bookmakers offers uk.

Seven-time Wimbledon champion Serena Williams will also be around to have a say and MoPlay is offering +450 on the 37-year-old coming out on top. Meanwhile, Betfair is offering +640 odds on Czech pro Petra Kvitova winning the tournament while Naomi Osaka is at +850 to emerge the victor with MoPlay.

Women’s tennis has no shortage of young talent at the moment and the final between 23-year-old Barty and the 19-year-old Vondrousova is proof of that. The former is actually the ninth different female champion in the last 10 Grand Slam tournaments while five of this year’s seven biggest WTA tournaments have been won by players who are 23 years and under.

Stars Old And New Decorate Roland Garros In 2017

by Rob Hemingway

 

Perhaps it is fitting that a tournament named after a trailblazing fighter pilot who vanquished his many adversaries should become so synonymous with Rafael Nadal, who administers the same fate to his opponents as Roland Garros did during the First World War.

After putting away Stan Wawrinka on Sunday in Paris, the Majorcan notched up yet another French Open title and achieved La Decima, his tenth grand slam victory in one event, a feat that transcends sport and is surely comparable with any other individual achievement in the modern age.

Such unparalleled dominance, the result of a unique combination of extraordinary talent, world-class coaching and insatiable drive, has been supplemented in the 2017 edition of his reign by the presence in his camp of long-time friend and influence, Carlos Moya. Analysis of Nadal’s matches during these two weeks – and indeed earlier in the year – is clear evidence of subtle tweaks that have allowed him to be so successful since returning to the tour after injury. These changes, including an improved backhand and greater consistency and variety on the serve, should allow him to remain competitive even as age and physical decline gradually take their toll over the coming years.

There was enough evidence in Paris this year to suggest that the men’s game will be well served even when Nadal and his “Big 5” rivals have moved on. Dominic Thiem, the 23 year-old Austrian, broke through emphatically in getting through to the semifinals, and Karen Khachanov, the 21-year old from Moscow, displayed all his emerging skills during a run to the fourth round. Further down the age range, the next big thing from the junior ranks could be Alexei Popyrin, who triumphed in the Boys Singles, becoming the first Australian to take home the title since Phil Dent in 1968.  His game, modeled on Juan Martin del Potro’s, could become equally as effective, given his powerful serve and varied forehand.

On the other side of the locker room, the women’s event revealed a new superstar. Jelena Ostapenko, the unseeded 20-year-old Latvian, defeated the experienced Simona Halep in three sets, sparking wild celebrations at Riga’s iconic Freedom Monument as the country celebrated its first ever Grand Slam champion. This was a remarkable triumph given that she went the distance in every match from the fourth round onwards, that she was a set and a break down in the final, and particularly as clay is her least favourite surface. This breakthrough should equip her with the necessary confidence to build on this win which, incredibly, was also her first ever on the women’s tour.

Tournament Director Guy Forget fortunately had far fewer scheduling headaches this year than in 2016, as the weather remained dry enough to catch up on matches delayed from the first week’s showers. The modernisation project at Roland Garros – provisionally approved earlier this year – cannot come soon enough however. Capacity issues still affect the site, particularly when compared to the other three Grand Slams, and the roof that will be present for this year’s US Open will once again throw into focus the glacial pace of change in French Tennis’ administrative corridors.

As the last of the players now start dusting down their socks, the grass of Wimbledon looms large on the horizon. All eyes will be on the returning, rejuvenated Roger Federer, whose decision to rest during the clay court swing could bear fruit as he seeks his eighth crown in south-west London. It promises to be another unmissable event in this already extraordinary 2017 season.

Rafael Nadal – A Perfect “10” French Open Victory With No Sets Lost

by Randy Walker

@TennisPublisher

 

It was “Perfect 10.”

Rafael Nadal won his incredible 10th men’s singles title at Roland Garros, without losing a set, capped with a 6-3, 6-2, 6-1 demolition of Stan Wawrinka in the final.

The win marked Nadal’s 15th major title, moving him out of a second-place tie with Pete Sampras for most major singles titles won in a career.

Nadal lost only 35 games en route to the title – his best run to the championship in his 10 victory laps – and the fewest games lost by a major champion since Bjorn Borg lost only 32 en route to winning the 1978 French Open.

No man in the history of tennis has won more titles at a single major championship, Margaret Court being the only player to win double-digit titles at a major when she won 11 Australian singles titles.

It is interesting to note and remember that Nadal led Roger Federer by a service break in the fifth set of their Australian Open final earlier this year. Had Nadal held on to win that match and win the title Down Under, coupled with his win at Roland Garros, he would have only trailed Federer by one major singles title in the career haul 17-16. However, Federer’s comeback win gave him his 18th major singles win and he now leads Nadal 18-15 as the resting Federer prepares to make an assault on an eighth Wimbledon title – and a 19th major – on the grass.

Nadal’s win came 39 years to the day when Borg completed his devastating run to the French title in 1978, with a 6-1, 6-1, 6-3 victory over Guillermo Vilas, according to the book, ebook, audio book and mobile app “This Day In Tennis History.”

It is interesting to read the words of Vilas after being pummeled by Borg and it sounds like Wawrinka talking about Nadal. “He played so well, he didn’t give me any chances at all,” said Vilas. “I knew if I was going to play from the baseline all the time, I was going to win more games but not the match. So I tried different tactics, but it did not work. Nothing worked.”

A Preview of the 2017 French Open

The French Open at Roland Garros in Paris is the second Grand Slam of the year, and, following Roger Federer’s success in Melbourne where he claimed the 18th GS title of his career, it could spring another surprise winner.

 

Rafael Nadal tops the betting with the bookmakers, where the King of Clay can be backed at 5/2 to win his 10th French Open title, with a number of free bet offers also available to first-time punters. The Spaniard looked back to his best in the Australian Open where he was runner-up, and although he has struggled with injuries over the last couple of years, it now appears he is 100% fit again.

Nadal has only been beaten on three occasions at Roland-Garros, and the world number seven will be the name everyone will want to avoid in their half of the draw. With a full preparation expected this year, the man from Manacor will fancy his chances of lifting the trophy in Paris once again.

Defending champion Novak Djokovic has not been as consistent since his victory in this event in 2016. The Serbian was surprisingly beaten by Sam Querrey in the third round at Wimbledon just a month after his win in Paris, and the 12-time Grand Slam winner then lost his place at the top of the world rankings to Andy Murray. Not only that, but he has also started 2017 poorly, going out in the second round of the Australian Open to Denis Istomin.

The French Open has historically been Djokovic’s worst Grand Slam tournament. His game is not generally suited to clay; however, most recently he has been able to adapt to the surface well, which has resulted in him reaching the last two finals.

Djokovic missed the Miami Open last week due to injury and will now get some rest before the clay court season. If he is to return to the top of the world rankings at the end of the year, he will need to find his best game again ahead of the two Grand Slams in the middle of the calendar year.

Murray is also struggling with a niggling injury at the moment, and was forced to pull out of the Miami Open. The world number one has only made the final once at Roland-Garros and that was last year where he lost to Djokovic in four sets.

The British player has already won a title in 2017, as he was successful in the Dubai Duty Free Tennis Championships last month. He did, however, lose in the second round of the Indian Wells Masters a week later to Vasek Pospisil.

Despite clay being his least successful surface, Murray has performed consistently well in France over the last three years; he has gone as far as at least the semi-final in each of those tournaments.

Murray won his first clay court tournament in Madrid in 2015 where he beat Nadal in straight sets in the final. In what is arguably the most open French Open in many years, the world’s top-ranked player will be in with a big chance of breaking his maiden in Paris in June.

Shelby Rogers Is New American Tennis Cinderella

by Ashley Brownstein

 

With the clay season complete and another French Open in the books we get that rare time to reflect on the two weeks in Paris before we start up again with a new major. We now know the obvious headlines, Serena Williams falling short again of slam twenty-two and Novak Djokovic completing his career grand slam. But for American tennis it was especially exciting as one of our own, whose name wasn’t Williams, made it to the quarterfinals. Shelby Rogers, 23, was the American that cemented herself as the one making a lasting impression.  Rogers entered the French Open ranked 108 in the world but took out three seeded players before falling to Garbine Muguruza who became the eventual champion.

Now we turn our attention to grass as we prepare for the road to Wimbledon. Shelby is looking to expand on her success from Paris while in Mallorca, Spain as she tunes up on grass. With the change of scenery (not just sunny skies rather than consistent rain) comes the switch to a new surface. But that doesn’t seem to faze Shelby; rather she finds that grass is better suited to her game. With a big serve and powerful groundstrokes she feels she can carry the success from clay to grass.

“I served especially well in Paris so that’s definitely a positive,” she said. “It gives me pretty high confidence to take from the French that I can carry over here.”

Confidence she has but what about pressure?

“No I don’t really feel any right now,” she said. “Especially being in Europe it’s not as big of a deal. Maybe if I was in the states I’d feel it more but I’m really enjoying being here. You see different players and feel a different dynamic with the grass but I’m just trying to push myself and also be realistic. My goal at the beginning of the year was to make it into the slams this summer, which I’ve already achieved so I’m proud of that. I want to finish the year definitely in the top seventy-five so again realistic but there are always things I can improve on.”

Shelby seems to possess the type of realistic stamina that will keep her in the game for some time. And while she “of course” wants to reach number one in the world one day she does find this time for women’s tennis very exciting. Who wouldn’t? The past three slam winners have all been first time champions. Add to that the support coming from the locker room itself. As Shelby describes “it’s really an amazing thing to be a part of American tennis. We’re all cordial, all friends and give each other friendly competition. We genuinely want each other to do well, I’m so happy to be a part of that.”

Of course it is too soon to tell and no one really knows what will happen in the future. But if I had to guess Shelby Rogers is going to do everything she can to make sure that she is a part of the future of American tennis. Even though we were gifted with one “Cinderella story” perhaps we can get a second at Wimbledon. Shelby even said “on any given day it could be your time in women’s tennis” so why not hers?

Djokovic Completes “Novak Slam” With Roland Garros Victory

by Kevin Craig

@KCraig_Tennis

 

Novak Djokovic was able to complete the “Novak Slam” on Sunday as he defeated Andy Murray for his first French Open title after four runs to the final, and he now has won all four major titles consecutively.

The Serb was able to withstand an early onslaught from the Brit, who many believed to be the favorite in the match, and eventually won in four sets by a score of 3-6, 6-1, 6-2, 6-4, giving Djokovic his 12th major title and making him the first player to simultaneously own all four major titles since Rod Laver in 1969.

“It was flawless tennis. I really felt like I played on a high quality,” said Djokovic.

The Serb, so excited to win that one major title that had remained out of his grasp throughout his career, called it “a thrilling moment. One of the most beautiful I have had in my career.”

Djokovic, who had beaten Murray in 12 of their past 14 matches, attacked first, breaking at love to open up the match before Murray turned the tables. Two breaks in a row with a hold at love in between gave Murray a 3-1 lead, and he didn’t look back from there as not much went against serve from that moment on. Three holds later and Murray was two sets away from his third major title.

“Nerves kicked in. I needed a little bit of time to really find the right rhythm and start to play the way I intended,” said Djokovic.

The No. 1 player in the world wasn’t going to go down that easy, though, and the second set was all his as he was able to find that right rhythm. After saving a break point in the first game of the set, Djokovic completely dominated. Murray was broken in two of his three service games, and the one in which he was not broken he fought off a break point and was taken to deuce. The Serb also only lost three points total in his last three service games, completing the recipe of how to win a set 6-1.

The third set was more of the same as Djokovic broke Murray twice. There was more difficulty on serve in the set for the Serb as he lost at least two points in each of his service games, while being taken to deuce twice. In one of those deuce games, Djokovic staved off four break points, making the statement that he would not be missing out on another opportunity to win his first French Open.

With a break to open up the fourth set, Djokovic had all but finished off the No. 2 player in the world. After losing only one point on serve total in his next three service games and taking Murray to deuce twice, Djokovic earned a 0-40 lead at 4-2 and capitalized on his first opportunity to break and set up a chance to serve for the title.

The Brit was able to show some signs of life as he broke Djokovic and consolidated his serve to extend the match, but it just delayed the inevitable. In the next game, Djokovic was able to hold to close out the match, finally earning the right to call himself a French Open champion.

“In the last point, I don’t even remember what happened…it’s like my spirit left my body” said Djokovic.

With this title, the 29-year old has become just the eighth man in history to complete the career grand slam, solidifying his right to be in the conversation of the greatest tennis players of all time.

Andy Murray Ends Stan Wawrinka’s Roland Garros Reign

by Kevin Craig

@KCraig_Tennis

 

Andy Murray dethroned the defending French Open champion Stan Wawrinka on Friday with a 6-4, 6-2, 4-6, 6-2 win.

Murray, who became the first player from Great Britain to reach the French Open in 79 years after Bunny Austin did so in 1937, played an almost perfect match as he reached his first French Open final and his 10th major final overall.

“I played one of my best matches here today,” said Murray in his post-match interview on court.

The No. 2 seed Murray, who had to battle from a two sets to love deficit in the first round against Radek Stepanek and a two sets to one deficit to a French wild card in the second round, has been able to gain confidence throughout his run to the final and return to the form that saw him win the title in Rome just before the French Open began.

That form from Murray was at peak levels on Friday against a player who reached his own peak levels of form in the French Open final in 2015 as Wawrinka put on a masterclass performance to snatch the title and the calendar grand slam from Novak Djokovic last year.

When Wawrinka, who was on a 12-match win streak at Roland Garros, held at love and forced Murray to take 11 minutes to hold his first service game, it looked like things may very well be in the favor of the Suisse in the early stages. This may not have been surprising at all to fans of Wawrinka as he had won his last three matches against Murray and had never lost a set to him on clay.

That feeling quickly changed though as Murray was able to save a break point before breaking Wawrinka in the next game, eventually leading 3-1.

The rest of the set was pretty straight forward until Murray served to close out the set as he was forced to fend off three break points before taking the one set lead.

It was all Murray in the second set as he broke Wawrinka at love for a 2-1 lead before breaking again two games later, eventually closing out the set 6-2, losing just three points on serve in the set that lasted only 27 minutes.

Murray continued to roll on serve in the third set, holding at love in his first three service games. The problem for the Brit was he was unable to convert the one break point he saw in the set, and Wawrinka was able to take advantage of the first poor service game Murray played since the beginning of the match, fighting back from 40-15 and winning four points in a row to break and win the set.

Wawrinka stealing the third set just delayed the inevitable as Murray’s roll went right over that minor speed bump as he was able to break in the first game of the fourth set. Murray had zero trouble on serve in the fourth set, losing just four points in four games, including a hold at love to close out the match and clinch his spot in the final.

“Stan has been unbelievable the last two years. I’ve played one of my best matches today…I’m just really proud. I never expected to reach the final here…Hopefully I can put up a good match in the final,” said Murray.

Murray’s impressive fitness level and ability to hit effective groundstrokes from anywhere on the court were on full display, as he looks like he can pose a very dangerous threat to Djokovic in this year’s final.

MurrayBeatsWawrinka

Serena Williams Endures Once Again To Reach French Open Semifinals

by Kevin Craig

@KCraig_Tennis

 

Serena Williams reached the semifinals of the French Open on Thursday after battling back from a set and a break down against Yulia Putintseva, winning 5-7, 6-4, 6-1.

Putintseva, who represents Kazakhstan and is currently the No. 60 player in the world, had been on a great run to reach the quarterfinals, beating the No. 12 seed Carla Suarez Navarro and the No. 28 seed Andrea Petkovic along the way.

This run may have been rather unexpected for the 21-year old Putintseva as she had lost three of her four previous matches coming into the tournament, including one to a player ranked outside of the Top 100.

On a chilly day with difficult conditions, Putintseva was able to put that to the side and continue her confident play in Paris, not letting the task of facing the 21-time major champion in Williams get to her.

“I feel like she gives 200 percent on every single point…she’s a fighter,” said Williams of Putintseva before the match began, and she was spot on with her statement.

In the early goings, the Kazakh looked confident and in charge as she fought through a deuce game in her first service game of the match before having a look at two break points in the next game. Putintseva capitalized on the second and held at love to consolidate for a 3-1 lead early on.

Williams was able to break back and appear to kill off the challenge from her opponent, as we have seen so many times before from Williams with her killer instinct, but this match was different. Putintseva fought hard, losing only one point in her next three service games, and broke in the 11th game of the set after fighting back from a 40-0 deficit before holding at love to close out the set.

The first set saw an enormous difference in the unforced error tally, as Williams hit 24 while Putinsteva only hit two.

The charge continued early in the second set as Putintseva was able to break in the first game, sending major warning bells throughout the tennis world that the No. 1 player was in trouble.

Those alarms were quickly silenced, however, as Williams rattled off the next four games to jump out to a 4-1 lead. Putintseva continued her tenacious fight, though, breaking back and getting the set to 4-4, where she had a look at two break points for a chance to serve for the match.

Williams was able to fight those off and used her experience and overall advantage in the skill department to break in the next game, completely diminishing the confidence of the 21-year old as she levelled the match at a set apiece, the dagger coming on a double fault from Putintseva while down set point.

The third set was a breeze for Williams as she felt little resistance from Putintseva, racing out to a 5-0 lead before eventually closing out the match with a 6-1 third set win.

Putintseva, despite the loss, was able to remain positive and is looking forward to the future.

“I had some great wins here. I won some really good matches. I’m really happy with that. I’m really happy with the level that I was playing during all of this tournament…I got a lot of experience now,” said Putintseva.

Williams, who always seems to be due for one massive scare during her journey to the final of a major, showed just how she has been able to rack up 21 major titles and hold on to the No. 1 ranking for 295 weeks.

“At one point I didn’t see the light at the end of the tunnel…She played unbelievable. I honestly didn’t think I was going to win, but somehow I did,” said Williams.

Her opponent in the semifinals will be the Cinderella story Kiki Bertens, who is making a lot of personal history this fortnight in Paris.

The Dutchwoman has been able to not only reach her first semifinal at a major, but also her first quarterfinal, will reach a new career high ranking of at least No. 27, and has clinched her spot on the Dutch team at the summer Olympics in Rio this summer.

Bertens has defeated the No. 3 seed Angelique Kerber, the No. 15 seed Madison Keys, the No. 29 seed Daria Kasatkina, and now the No. 8 seed Timea Bacsinsky after her straight sets win on Thursday.

Bertens, who is now on a 12-match win streak, was able to dispatch Bacsinsky 7-5, 6-2.

High Stakes For Thiem, Goffin at Roland Garros

by Kevin Craig

@KCraig_Tennis

 

Dominic Thiem of Austria and David Goffin both reached their first major quarterfinal and have even higher stakes to play for when they meet up on Thursday.

In Wednesday’s fourth round action, Thiem dispatched Marcel Granollers in four sets, 6-2, 6-7(2), 6-1, 6-4, while Goffin upended Ernests Gulbis, also in four sets, 4-6, 6-2, 6-2, 6-3. Both matches were completions of matches that had begun on Tuesday.

Goffin, 25-years old, and Thiem, 22-years old, will now play with the winner reaching their first semifinal in a major, as well as reaching the Top 10 of the ATP World Tour rankings for the first time in their career.

Thiem, the No. 13 seed, resumed his match at the very beginning of the third set, so he was essentially playing a best-of-three set match with Granollers. Three sets were not needed, though, as Thiem, who has been in impressive form in 2016, was able to continue his great run of play.

With three clay court titles already in his pocket, as well as having the most wins of any player on the ATP World Tour this year, Thiem raced through his first set hitting winner after winner. The rain may have been a blessing in disguise for him, though, as it slowed down the roll of Granollers who was able to take advantage of an increased error count in the second set from Thiem and rattle off the set in a tiebreak to make things more interesting.

When play resumed on Wednesday, the Austrian raced out to win the third set in less than half an hour before going on to break late in the fourth set, accentuating the win with a hold at love to close out the match.

While Thiem has played well in recent months, even he is slightly surprised with the success that he has been able to have.

“Two years ago I was here with Gulbis and he played semifinals, and back then I couldn’t really imagine that I’d go this far myself one day…it feels really good,” said Thiem.

In Goffin’s fourth round match with Gulbis, who reached the French Open semifinals in 2014 but is now ranked No. 80 in the world, the Latvian was playing with house money to begin with, as he was only able to advance to the fourth round when his third round opponent, Jo-Wilfried Tsonga, retired with an injury while leading in the first set.

That “nothing to lose” mentality helped the Gulbis in the early stages as he was able to spray winners all over the court and play confidently, as he always does in these big stages.

Goffin, though, had confidence in this matchup as he had won their two previous encounters, and used that to start his comeback journey when play resumed on Wednesday.

The winners turned into errors for Gulbis allowing Goffin to capitalize on his opportunity to take the third set before easily closing out the match in the fourth, thanks, in part to a double fault from Gulbis on match point.

“It’s not easy to wait for three days for your match…the stress level if pretty high for everybody. So it takes a lot of energy in the end. I think he dealt with it better,” said Gulbis of how Goffin was able to close out the match.

Goffin and Thiem will now meet up for the eighth time in their careers, with the Belgian currently holding a 5-2 record. That record on clay courts is an even 1-1, while Goffin won the only match they played in a major, beating Thiem in four sets at the Australian Open this year.

“We practice a lot together and hang around a little bit outside the court. I think it’s going to be a very nice match,” said Thiem of his relationship with Goffin.

“That’s going to be a tough match,” said Goffin. “He can play all types of shots from the baseline…He serves really well…Physically he can play many tournaments and the big matches. He has everything it takes to play well on clay, and mentally, I have the impression he feels good.”

Pironkova Upsets No. 2 Seed Radwanska In Rainy Roland Garros

by Kevin Craig

@KCraig_Tennis

 

Tsvetana Pironkova of Bulgaria had the biggest upset of the French Open so far as she downed the No. 2 seed Agnieszka Radwanska on Tuesday, 3-6, 6-3, 6-3.

The match, which started on Sunday but was delayed due to weather, resumed with Radwanska leading comfortably at 6-3, 3-0. After a 39 hour delay, though, Pironkova took complete control of the match, reeling off six games in a row to come back and win the set, losing only one point in her last two service games, to force a decider.

The third set was more of the same as the Bulgarian was able to win four more games in a row to start out, running her game streak to 10 overall. That 4-0 lead was cut to 4-2 as Radwanska got one of the breaks back, but that was all she could salvage out of the match as Pironkova was too good and closed out the match comfortably.

Pironkova, currently ranked No. 102 in the world, has been known as a grass court specialist as she made the semifinals of Wimbledon in 2010 and the quarterfinals in 2011, but has also showed her prowess on the clay courts, winning two titles.

That clay court skill was on display as she was able to take advantage of a distracted Radwanska, who seemed to be disinterested in being on the court. Pironkova made sure to not let the poor conditions get to her and just focus on what was happening on the court.

“Today I tried to leave the fact that it was raining out of my mind and just focus on each and every point. Obviously that worked. If the court is not fit for play…they would cancel the match right away. But today the court was okay, we could have played, and so we did,” said Pironkova, the former No. 31 player in the world.

Pironkova has now beaten the No. 2, No. 19, and No. 22 seeds in her run to the quarterfinals in Paris and is not done yet.

The French Open continues to be a site of struggle for Radwanska. Aside from making the quarterfinals in 2013, the Pole has lost in the first three rounds of the tournament in six out of her 10 appearances, including in 2015 when she lost in the first round to the No. 83 player in the world.

Radwanska made clear that she was happy with the court conditions.

“I’m just so surprised and angry that we have to play in the rain…it’s a grand slam. How can you allow players to play in the rain? I cannot play in these conditions,” said Radwanska. “I don’t think they really care what we think. I think they care about other things.”

Simona Halep, who lost to Sam Stosur on Tuesday, was also displeased with the court conditions.

“It was impossible to play in my opinion…no one cares about the players in my opinion,” said Halep. “I don’t care that I lost the match today, but I was close to getting injured with my back, that’s a big problem.”

Pironkova’s opponent in the quarterfinals will be Stosur, a former French Open finalist.