Photo of the Day

Sloane Secures Her First Slam

Of the final four Americans in the women’s main draw of the US Open, Sloane Stephens was the last standing after defeating her good friend Madison Keys in the final 6-3, 6-0.

Both players came back from injuries in 2017, faced each other for the first time in a Grand Slam event, and were only the seventh pair of singles finalists in the Open Era to be appearing in their first Grand Slam championship match simultaneously. It was the 94th time an American woman has won the US Open singles trophy.

“I should just retire now,” Stephens said afterward. “I told Maddie I’m never going to be able to top this.”

Photo by Chris Nicholson, author of ‘Photographing Tennis.’ Follow Chris’ US Open photos on Instagram (@ShootingTennis).

Men’s Semis Set

Spain’s Pablo Carreno Busta didn’t take his first career Grand Slam semifinal laying down—not most of it, anyway. But opponent and eventual winner Kevin Anderson did run Busta around enough so that the Spaniard, exasperated, took a breather right on court after slipping to the ground.

Anderson, of South Africa, advanced to his first Grand Slam singles final with the 4-6, 7-5, 6-3, 6-4 upset. That final will be against Rafael Nadal, winner of 15 Grand Slam singles titles. “I’m sure there will be different emotions when I walk out onto the court on Sunday. But it will be very important for me as quickly as possible to really try, as much as I can, to block that out,” Anderson says. “Any match you face, you can be nervous. It’s just a larger scale. I’m looking forward to the opportunity. I have worked really hard to get here. It’s great I have given myself a spot.”

Photo by Chris Nicholson, author of ‘Photographing Tennis.’ Follow Chris’ US Open photos on Instagram (@ShootingTennis).

Wheelchair Tennis Debuts in Ashe Stadium

Arthur Ashe Stadium is celebrating its 20th year hosting US Open matches, yet none of those contests involved wheelchair tennis—until today. In the first stadium match of Day 11, Alfie Hewett (pictured) and Gordon Reid defeated Shingo Kunedia and Gustavo Fernandez, 6-3, 6-2, in the first wheelchair tennis match ever played on American tennis’ grandest stage. They were followed by women’s semifinalists Dana Mathewson and Aniek van Koot, who defeated Yui Kamiji and Lucy Shuker 0-6, 6-4, [10-5].

“It was incredible to have that opportunity as wheelchair players,” Reid says. “It’s showing the respect that wheelchair tennis is gaining, a great first match here. It’s probably the nicest court I played on, so for me, it really is the stuff that dreams are made of. Hopefully, it’s not the last time.”

Photo by Chris Nicholson, author of ‘Photographing Tennis.’ Follow Chris’ US Open photos on Instagram (@ShootingTennis).

Master Class – Djokovic Overcomes Federer In US Open Final

In one of the sport’s great rivalries, two of tennis history’s best competed in Sunday’s US Open men’s final, as No. 1 seed Novak Djokovic defeated No. 2 Roger Federer 6-4, 5-7, 6-4, 6-4. “Winning a Grand Slam is very special for any tennis player when you are dreaming of becoming a professional,” Djokovic said after the match. “To win against one of the all-time Grand Slam champions, somebody that always keeps on fighting till the last point, keeps making you play an extra shot … all these things are very special to me.”

Photo: Chris Nicholson, www.PhotographingTennis.com

Perfectly Pennetta – Italian Veteran Wins US Open, Promptly Announces Retirement

Flavia Pennetta

Saturday’s women’s final was destined to guarantee two US Open superlatives: the first Italian winner, and the oldest first-time Grand Slam singles champion in the Open Era. Flavia Pennetta, 33, claimed both distinctions with a 7-6, 6-2 win over countrywoman Roberta Vinci. The final also marked another final, as in Pennetta’s last Grand Slam match. Before even accepting her champion’s trophy, she announced she would retire at season’s end. She said she made the decision a month ago, but began considering the option in late spring. “Sometimes we are more scared to take the decision because we don’t know what … we’re going to do after, how is going to be, the life after,” Pennetta said. “But I think it’s going to be a pretty good life. I mean, I’m really proud of myself. I think I did everything that I expected.”

Photo: Chris Nicholson, www.PhotographingTennis.com

Slam-Seek Suspended – Unseeded Vicci Stops Serena

Roberta Vinci accomplished the biggest upset in tennis history Friday, coming from behind to defeat formerly Grand Slam-destined Serena Williams 2-6, 6-4, 6-4. Gracious and commendatory, Williams praised the victor. “I thought she played the best tennis in her career,” Williams said. “You know, she’s 33 and, you know, she’s going for it at a late age. So that’s good for her to keep going for it and playing so well. Actually, I guess it’s inspiring.”

Photo: Chris Nicholson, www.PhotographingTennis.com

Historic Rain – Weather Washes Out US Open For Perhaps Last Time

Rainy US Open

Precipitation poured on Flushing Thursday, creating what may be the last rain-out ever at the US Open. The women’s semifinals were postponed until Friday, creating a stellar daylong extravaganza of penultimate men’s and women’s matches (Super Friday?). Next year Arthur Ashe Stadium will be roofed, so in the future, whatever the weather, the game will always be on.

Photo: Chris Nicholson, www.PhotographingTennis.com

Power Ranger – Halep Uses Deceptive Strength, Apparent Speed To Move Into Semis

Simona Halep

On Wednesday No.  2 seed Simona Halep powered past the taller and stronger Victoria Azarenka, 6-3, 4-6, 6-4. Their size difference (Halep is 5-foot-6, 132 pounds; Azarenka 6-foot-0, 148) was referenced earlier in the day by Flavia Pennetta, who also noted that fact’s irrelevance. “It look like she’s not that powerful, but she is,” Pennetta said. “To make a winner to her you have to finish the point seven times. She is always there, always in, the ball is always coming back.” Pennetta and Halep are due for a Friday semifinal showdown. “It is going to be like a marathon,” Pannetta said.

Photo: Chris Nicholson, www.PhotographingTennis.com

30-All – Vinci Victory Propels Her Toward Another Vet

Roberta Vinci

While in one Tuesday quarterfinal a 30-something woman proceeded exactly as expected, in another a 30-something woman explored new territory. Roberta Vince, 32,  reached her first Grand Slam singles semifinal with a 6-3, 5-7, 6-4 win over the decade-younger Kristina Mladenovic. “I’m not young, so probably my experience helped me a lot,” she said. “I think I’m at the end of my career, so my first semifinal, it’s incredible.” Her upcoming semi will be an Ashe Stadium showdown with that other 30-something, Serena Williams. In this matchup, Vinci doesn’t expect her age and wisdom to much affect the outcome. “I know that I have a lot of experience, but when you play against Serena, that doesn’t matter. You have to play better, then better, then better.”

Photo: Chris Nicholson, www.PhotographingTennis.com

Superserves – Federer And Isner Battle From The Baseline

Roger Federer

Roger Federer has won more night matches at the US Open than any other man in history. John Isner’s serve hadn’t been broken in Flushing in two years. Odds were that one of those two stats had to give in their fourth-round match Monday night, and at the end it proved to be the latter. After winning tie-breaks in the first and second set, Federer finally broke the American in the last game of the third, winning 7-6, 7-6, 7-5.

Photo: Chris Nicholson, www.PhotographingTennis.com