people magazine


I am sure I am joining millions of tennis fans worldwide in showing my utmost sympathies for Martina Navratilova following her recent revelations in that now infamous People Magazine interview.

In February, she was diagnosed with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) which is confined to the milk ducts so has luckily not spread to the surrounding tissue.

As reported, Martina has revealed that the prospects look good as it was caught at such an early stage.

She has described that fateful day as “my own personal 9/11,” and that receiving the news brought her to tears. She also says that this battle has been severely harder than any she faced on-court against the likes of Chris Evert, Steffi Graf or Monica Seles.

One who has not gone through such a meeting with their physician can only imagine what must have been going through her head on receiving the news but as somebody related to so many sufferers over the years I have seen the struggles first hand.

While there is no circumstance in which you would wish such an affliction on any human being this has proved to be another case where somebody who doesn’t deserve to face such trauma has been dealt an awful hand.

I had the great fortune of meeting Martina last summer and she came across as a tremendously graceful individual who didn’t make you feel a lesser person in any way stood next to her hugely talented self.

My heart sank at discovering the news earlier today as she unfortunately joins a long list of sportsmen over the past few years who have suffered from similar setbacks.

“I feel so in control of my life and my body,” said Martina. “And then this comes and it’s completely out of my hands.”

That statement makes a lot of sense considering the amount of time sportsmen and women spend over their lives fine tuning and perfecting their physiques. To then be faced with a problem they can do nothing to prevent or cure must be a worrying scenario for somebody who is used to a brisk treatment from the physio and hard training.

However she must take relief from her physical conditioning when undergoing the radiology she is due to start in May. A couple of lower league footballers playing in England who have recently undergone similar treatment for their fights with cancer both agreed their peak physical condition helped with the speed of progress.

Usually taking routine mammograms Martina admits she had “let it slide” by leaving a four year gap between her last two. She readily admits another year’s delay could have spelt serious trouble.

Being a fitness spokesperson for AARP she has spoken about the utmost importance for people to keep up regular checks in a bid to prevent themselves from receiving such terrible news.

Good news for Martina has come from British cancer charity Cancer Research UK who say anybody treated for DCIS is almost certainly cured of the disease. We hope that this is again the case.

So with deepest sympathies and a rallying cry for Martina to keep fighting I would like to take this opportunity to wish her the best of luck from everybody here at TennisGrandstand and that we one day wish to see her take her rightful place on court once more.

Get well soon Martina.


People Magazine is reporting that tennis Hall of Famer Martina Navratilova has been diagnosed with breast cancer, but her prognosis is said to be excellent.

The story: linked here:,,20358261,00.html reports that the nine-time Wimbledon champion cried when she was diagnosed last February. Navratilova recently competed in the Hit for Haiti fundraiser in Indian Wells, Calif., last month along with Lindsay Davenport and Justine Henin.

The report says Navratilova had a lumpectomy and will begin six weeks of radiation therapy next month. It added that the nine-time Wimbledon women’s singles champion was diagnosed with a noninvasive form of breast cancer called ductal carcinoma in situ, or DCIS.