opponent

Maria Sharapova’s Stay in Tokyo is Short but Sweet

Even though it’s still early in the tournament , the Toray Pan Pacific has been very surprising already so far. Before this tournament started I had high hopes for a good series in Tokyo but Sharapova never really launched at this year’s Toray Pan Pacific. She lost in the first round to WTA Tour veteran Kimiko Date-Krumm.But Sharapova ended up losing in the first round in three sets 7-5 3-6 6-3.

As you may know, Maria Sharapova has been struggling ever since her shoulder surgery back in ’08.  She has won three Grand Slam tourneys but after that operation nothing ever really was the same for Sizzlin’ Sharapova.

Said Date-Krumm: “Playing against a player who used to be number one and the defending champion I knew I had to play my best. I just got back from Korea yesterday and felt really tired but my body felt a little better today.”

And what did Sharapova about her 40 year old opponent:

“It’s incredible,” said Sharapova. “It just shows you how she has stayed in such great shape while away from the game. She is incredibly fit.”

But at least Sharapova had some fun at Kids Day:

And here are some photos of the first round match between Maria Sharapova and Kimiko Date-Krumm

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Caroline Wozniacki Talks

After the exciting match between Caroline Wozniacki and Dominika Cibulkova, which Caroline won in straight sets 6-2, 7-5,  Wozniacki sat down with  Next Contenders for an exclusive interview.

Here is an excerpt of the interview and you can find the article at American Express’ NextContenders.com

Sweet Caroline did it again on Wednesday night, knocking out her quarterfinals opponent, Slovak Dominika Cibulkova, in just two sets 6 2, 7 5, and continuing her impressive run of not dropping a single set at the Open, despite the windy conditions on Arthur Ashe Stadium.

“I’m happy to be through definitely, it was a tough one,” Caroline told me when we caught up after the match. “The wind was not easy to cope with. It was just about getting it in. I wasn’t really thinking to place it anywhere special, I was just thinking about getting it in. But a win is a win and I’m happy to be through to the semifinals.”

Next up, Caroline faces seventh-seeded Vera Zvonareva of Russia, who she beat in the finals of the Rogers Cup in Montreal last month in straight sets, and who also made it to the finals of Wimbledon this year.

“She’s a tough player. She’s a good competitor,” Caroline said. “She takes the ball and really tries to be aggressive all the time. So it’s going to be a tough match.”

Of course, Caroline’s game has improved greatly since her last Open, which she’s not shy about admitting. “I definitely think I’m a better player now than I was before,” she said, to which I asked how exactly she upped her game.

“Well, the fitness definitely has been a big part of it— boxing, running, a lot of cardio. I’m in better shape now than I’ve ever been, I think, and that’s helped me to get into the right positions for my shots and that’s a good feeling to know that you can just continue.”

And they also provided us with some great videos:

Caroline Wozniacki – Language lessons and loose lips

Caroline on being the face of Stella McCartney’s Adidas line

Caroline says hello to the city of New York

What to wear? The fashionable Caroline Wozniacki tells us what it takes to win it all

Learning from Roger Federer’s Demeanour

By Ritesh Gupta

The ball went up in the air and the way it swirled in the cold windy conditions, it looked as if the server completely lost the connection with the ball for that split second. He decided not to connect and chose to have a re-go at it. Nothing unusual till this point, especially considering the playing conditions. But what stood out was the way all of this was taken in his stride by the server, without even a semblance of uneasiness. In fact, what he did before returning to his service stance, exemplified what the man, who happened to be Roger Federer, is all about.

As Federer took steps towards the service line, with his collar going up and down, and hair continuously being blown away, he chose to stretch his arms!

Now be it for being calm about intricacies of playing in such environment or focusing on the job at hand, Federer just goes about tennis as if nothing can come in between him and his sport.

All this happened during the early stages of the third set of his eventual 6-4, 6-4, 7-5 win over Robin Soderling in the quarterfinals of the US Open.

Going by the style of play of the two players, especially the high service toss and the huge forehand swing of Soderling, one would be tempted to say that the Swede definitely was expected to have a tough time vis-a-vis his opponent. Even if one considers this, the way Federer served against Soderling was simply immaculate. Soderling served bigger, but Federer was much better in the same department. The Swiss maestro served 18 aces to Soderling’s two.

The service statistics for the match show how Federer adapted to the conditions. But for him, it was just another day.

In the post match, on-court interview, Federer said if he can’t serve in the windy conditions, after doing all this in his life, then there is definitely problem out there! He said be it for 2 o’clock or 4 o’clock in the morning, he can be taken out of the bed and he would still be able to serve. When a man of Federer’s stature says all this, it definitely isn’t arrogance. Its just sheer passion for the sport.

Other than his positive attitude, Federer looked in prime touch.

Soderling struggled and looked very unsettled at times. He missed four breakpoints in the first set. On the other hand, Federer converted on his first opportunity and that is all he needed.

Soderling broke Federer with a great defensive return followed by a passing shot early on in the second set. But the Swede was again broken in the following game. In fact, the slide was started by an error from Soderling to finish the game at 40-0 at 2-1. A high ball, which swirled, resulted in the Swede attempting a stroke in an awkward position. After that, his forehand deserted him twice. On the other side, Federer just went about his task the way he usually does.

Soderling exerted pressure in the third set but Federer soaked in all of it, in fact at times showing great defensive skills. The Swede did break in the eight game to go up 5-3. But Federer again broke back immediately, as Soderling netted two forehands at 30-30. Continuing in the same vein, the Swiss wrapped up the set and the match in the 12th game.

Federer is now 16-0 in night matches played on Arthur Ashe Stadium. This victory signals Federer’s readiness for the battle against Novak Djokovic for a place in the final. The triumph also resulted in a settling of scores as Soderling had beaten Federer in their last meeting at the French Open.

US Open Men’s Draw Analysis and Picks — Nalbandian, Fish, Nadal?

The 2010 US Open Men’s Draw was announced just hours ago, but there are already stories and predictions circulating the scene. Even though the qualifying tournament is still in progress, I’ll break down some of the potential matchups, great first- and second-rounders, and announce my picks, starting with the quarterfinalists!

First off, let’s take a look at where the top four seeds have landed in the draw. #4 Andy Murray finds himself in the top half with #1 Rafael Nadal, while #2 Roger Federer has #3 Novak Djokovic in his half of the draw.

Nadal’s 1/8

Nadal probably won’t face much opposition until the third round where he could meet Gilles Simon or Philipp Kohlschreiber. Feliciano Lopez and Ivan Ljubicic are then the only other seeded opponents left for Nadal to meet in the fourth round, but he hasn’t had much trouble with any of these players. Ljubicic has been pretty quiet this season having only had two matches on hard courts this summer. And while Lopez did make a run to the semis in Los Angeles last month, he continues to be wildly inconsistent having lost in the first round of both Toronto and Cincinnati.

Quarterfinalist: Rafael Nadal
Verdasco’s 1/8

Fernando Verdasco may find himself in trouble from the very first round, where he’ll meet his Wimbledon nemesis, Fabio Fognini. Fognini took out Verdasco in a tight four sets in the first round of Wimbledon this year — can he do it again in New York? If Verdasco does get past him, he’ll be rewarded with a newly resurgent David Nalbandian in the third round.

In the top half of this section, David Ferrer may also face a cruel first round opponent, Alexandr Dolgopolov. “Dolgo” is a fresh face and took Ferrer to three sets in Cincinnati just a couple of weeks ago. He has a unique playing style and could easily gain good rhythm that may take him to the third round. Here, he could face Ernests Gulbis, a player with a load of talent, but it’s anybody’s guess if his mental state is in the right drive to make a run here.

With Nalbandian’s first two rounds being fairly straight-forward wins, I see him overcoming both Verdasco and Gulbis in this section.

Quarterfinalist: David Nalbandian

Murray’s 1/8

Andy Murray’s first test may come in the third round when he faces #25 Stanislas Wawrinka. Wawrinka has recently changed coaches, but he may not even be a valid threat as he failed to reach a third round in any hard court tournament this summer. He may even find himself ousted in the second round by Yen-Hsun Lu, who defeated Andy Roddick at this year’s Wimbledon.

In the bottom half of this section, the most likely third rounder may be between Sam Querrey and Nicolas Almagro. Almagro, known for his clay court game, and Querrey, having another successful summer on the hard courts, should have a quick match with Querrey moving on. He will then face Murray but lose in a close four sets.

Quarterfinalist: Andy Murray

Berdych’s 1/8

Tomas Berdych comes in with a ‘slam high’ having made the semis in Roland Garros and finals in Wimbledon this year already. His first round against Michael Llodra could be a tricky one, as he plays a serve-and-volley game predominantly. Berdych likes hard fast balls and Llodra’s pace may throw him off. If Berdych survives he may meet another Frenchman Julien Benneteau or countryman Radek Stepanek in the third round.

The top half of this section may see a potential matchup between Mikhail Youzhny and John Isner. Isner is still questionable for the US Open due to an ankle injury he sustained in Cincinnati two weeks ago. If he is fully healed, he could be facing Berdych in the fourth round, but if not, it will be Mikhail Youzhny. Either way, this section’s quarterfinalist is set.

Quarterfinalist: Tomas Berdych

Davydenko’s 1/8

Nikolay Davydenko usually keeps a low profile while still winning, so it should be no surprise he is the #6 seed. Somehow, it still perplexes me he has managed to stay this high in the rankings. Davydenko’s first tough encounter may be as early as the second round, where he could face Richard Gasquet and his elegant one-handed backhand. Thomas Bellucci, with his steady results and great runs in the last two slams, could face Davydenko in the third round and come out victorious.

The bottom half of this section may be the biggest draw for fans. Andy Roddick will most likely take on Janko Tipsarevic in the second round. Tipsarevic has taken players (including Roger Federer) deep into the fifth set in past slams and he could easily tire a player like Andy out, who is still recovering from mono. The winner will get the treat to play the skilled acrobat, Gael Monfils in the third round. I’m optimistic with my choice for this section, but here it is.

Quarterfinalist: Andy Roddick

Djokovic’s 1/8

This section of the draw may be the most interesting. Novak Djokovic is a clear favorite, or is he? He complains of asthma-like lung problems in the heat and humidity, so he may not fare as well this year as in the past. He’ll quickly be challenged by his comrade and friend Viktor Troicki in the first round. If he survives, he’ll face Philipp Petzschner in the second round. Petzschner is a skilled player, having not only hoisted the Wimbledon doubles trophy this year, but also took Rafael Nadal to five sets as well at the same tournament. The only positive is that the third round opponent may be a breather, as potentials may be either James Blake or Juan Monaco.

The top half of this section boasts a potentially great matchup in the third round between Marcos Baghdatis and Mardy Fish. Both have had breakthrough summers and are near the top of the list in hard court wins on the year. For this to happen though, Baghdatis must overcome Arnaud Clement in the first round and probably Robby Ginepri in the second round. Fish, on the other hand, should have no trouble in his first two rounds. While Baghdatis has played five tournaments in a row coming into the US Open, Fish took a smart break after Cincinnati and should be ready to overtake Baghdatis. Fish will come in much fresher than Djokovic into their fourth round encounter, and while it’ll go five sets, the winner will be clear.

Quarterfinalist: Mardy Fish

Soderling’s 1/8

In the biggest cakewalk of the draw, Soderling has five qualifiers in his section, with one of them being his first round opponent. Imagine to get through three grueling rounds in qualifying only to find out you’re playing the world #5 in your first main draw round. Ouch! Soderling should breeze through Taylor Dent in the second round and not even be challenged in the third round by Fernando Gonzalez who is still recovering from injury.

Marin Cilic is Soderling’s greatest threat in the fourth round. But he must first overcome Evgeny Korolev in the second round and possibly Australian Carsten Ball in the third. Although, Korolev has had great results in the warmup tournament in New Haven so we could see an upset as early as the second round here.

Quarterfinalist: Robin Soderling

Federer’s 1/8

And in the second biggest cakewalk of the draw, Roger Federer may not be challeneged until the third round where he faces Lleyton Hewitt. Hewitt retired with an injury several weeks ago in Washington, DC and has recently split with his coach. Will this change of events take over Hewitt or will he put up a great fight and possibly overcome the champion?

In the top half of this section, we see Jurgen Melzer taking on Dmitry Tursunov, a player who has a protected ranking and decided to enter the US Open under that exemption. Melzer could then face tough young American Ryan Sweeting in the second round and veteran Juan Carlos Ferrero in the third. The match then between Melzer and Federer should be as straight forward as it was in Wimbledon this year.

Quarterfinalist: Roger Federer

Now, that my quarterfinalist picks are in order, let’s quickly breakdown my predictions to the semifinals!

Quarterfinal #1: Rafael Nadal d. David Nalbandian

Nadal has pretty much been unstoppable this season. He’s healthy and happy: no “broken abdominals” or knees, no familial problems and he finely-tuned his schedule to allow himself enough rest and recovery during the summer. Although Nalbandian is a confident competitor and his angles may blow some players off the court, he simply won’t last in a five-setter in the heat against Nadal.

Quarterfinal #2: Andy Murray d. Tomas Berdych

Berdych has a strong game and is a very powerful competitor if his mental stamina holds up. Andy Murray is known to complain and simply lose a match because of his own temper. It’s a tough draw between the two opponents, but Murray’s footwork will outlast Berych’s serve. Get ready for an even more grueling battle if Murray decides to be aggressive in his tactics.

Quarterfinal #3: Mardy Fish d. Andy Roddick

Fish has never been more fit and Roddick is coming off of a tough summer. On top of that, Fish has won their last two encounters within the last couple of months. Many are calling Fish the “darkhorse” this year and I’m jumping on the bandwagon. As much as Roddick has stayed consistent in his rankings the last six years, his results haven’t given much inspiration lately.

Quarterfinal #4: Roger Federer d. Robin Soderling

This is another tough one to call, but Soderling’s lackluster summer will catch up with him in New York and he’ll see himself crash out to Federer in a tough four sets. Although Soderling’s game is more suited to the hard courts, you can’t discount Federer’s run here the last six years. Elegance and precision will overcome power and grit.

In the semifinals, the matchups between both Nadal vs. Murray and Fish vs. Federer will be epic performances as each player could beat any other on any given day. It’s hard to predict the winner of each and I’ll leave that up to you. But for now, my vote is with Rafael Nadal, 2010 US Open Champion. It’s about time to add another flame to his Babolat bag and Nike shoes.

Happy watching and cheering!

If Your Opponent Runs Out Of Rackets, Don’t Lend Him One Of Yours!!!

Have you ever played a tennis match where your opponent broke strings in all of his rackets? Take it from former French Open and Wimbledon champion Jan Kodes, don’t lend them one of your rackets to continue playing! The following is an excerpt from Kodes’ new book JAN KODES: A JOURNEY TO GLORY FROM BEHIND THE IRON CURTAIN (A beautiful coffee table narrative book available here on amazon.com for $31.20: http://www.amazon.com/Jan-Kodes-Journey-Behind-Curtain/dp/0942257685/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1281452277&sr=8-1) where the Czech legend explains why!

After the Czechoslovak International Championships at Stvanice, Kodes was nominated to play an international tournament in a spa town Zinnowitz in East Germany. On the way there the Czechoslovaks took part in a friendly encounter in Halle. Kodes lost to Luttropp 6-3, 5-7, and 4-6 there but he remembers an episode that he likes to laugh about till today.

I had a match-point in the second set at 5:2. Before the match-point my opponent’s strings broke. He proceeded to the net and extended his hand for an end-of-the-match handshake saying that he had no other racket. He had two rackets but strings in the first burst right at the start.

“Don’t be silly,” I told him, “here is my racket, let’s finish the match.”

And that is what happened – I lost that match! I never again did anything similar to that.

I was young, honest, and fair. With time I learned that nobody gives anything gratis. It was yet another lesson.

Djokovic, Murray And Nadal Battle Through First Matches At Rogers Cup

It was an incredibly hot and humid day in Toronto on Wednesday as Novak Djokovic and Andy Murray made their first singles appearances at the Rogers Cup in Toronto. Both advanced to the third round but not without a struggle in their respective matches.

With on-court temperatures around the forty degree Celsius mark, Djokovic unsurprisingly struggled with the heat and had trainers come to his aid at several points throughout the match. As has been the case in the past, the talented Serbian was hindered more so by the weather than his opponent.

Red in the face and obviously labouring on the court between points, he had to come back from down a break against Julien Benneteau of France early in the second set. Djokovic managed to avoid going to a second set tie-break when he broke the Frenchman’s serve in the final game of the match. Had the match gone to a decisive set I believe we might have seen a retirement from the fragile world number two.

After the match Djokovic faced question after question about his health and why he seems to struggle so often in these types of conditions.

Asked to clarify what exactly goes on, he said, “Well it’s really hard to explain. Anybody who didn’t play professional level will not understand quite what’s going on. Today I was really on the edge, so health is the most important thing for me, and then tennis and success and whatever comes with it.”

Djokovic tried to reveal what he feared the worst case scenario might have been, “…at a certain moment you might collapse or whatever. But after half an hour, hour, with the proper recovery, you will get back to the normal feeling and normal state of body. I guess that in the long term it can hurt you, and it happens to me quite often. And, I don’t know, it’s just something that you cannot fight against. Nobody can turn off the sun and just do me a favour, even though I would like it.”

I’m not sure if Djokovic is struggling with some medical condition that he would rather not specifically describe or if he is just super-sensitive in the heat-threshold department. One thing is clear though – if these conditions hold up as expected, Djokovic will have trouble advancing deep into the draw. With Roger and Rafa likely to continue grabbing the prime-time evening spots in the schedule I think it is safe to say Novak will have to find a way to overcome his issues with the weather or he will soon find himself on a flight to Cincinnati.

For Andy Murray the obstacle today was not so much weather-related but rather a veteran opponent with a fierce forehand by the name of Xavier Malisse. In the early stages it appeared as though Murray was going to be in for a long match as the X-man raced out to a 4-2 lead. Serving at 5-4 however, Malisse would lose the next three games and have his serve broken twice in the process to lose 5-7.

In the second set Malisse completely fell apart and his once lethal forehand was suddenly missing the mark with regularity. Murray’s game was moving in the opposite direction and he was cleverly using his well-rehearsed drop shot to his advantage.

I watched the match today with my girlfriend, and she remarked how frustrating it used to be when I would drop shot her in a tennis video game we used to play together. That’s pretty much how Malisse felt during the second set as he stopped even trying to get to them towards the end of the match.

Serving at 2-3, Malisse would find a way to lose all four points in the game to surrender the critical break to Murray. At 2-5 he once again found himself down 0-40, but this time was able to salvage a couple of points before losing on Murray’s third match point. The final score was 7-5, 6-2 for Murray and he seemed happy with his first match as defending champion at the Rogers Cup.

“I feel good,” Murray said after the match had ended. “I mean, today could have been a little better from the start, but, you know, the first round is tough, and I was playing a very good player.”

During the evening session, Rafael Nadal finally made his singles debut. Going up against Stan Wawrinka seemed like it would be test on paper, but one that the Spaniard would likely handle with ease. Instead it took him 93 minutes to get through the first set. He would have to survive multiple set points against him during a see-saw tie-break that ended in his favour, 14-12.

The second set went more according to plan and Rafa closed it out without any unnecessary drama for a 7-6(12), 6-3 victory.

With Querrey and Marin Cilic both having been eliminated from that quarter of the draw, Nadal should now have an easier time advancing towards the finals.

In other results of note on Wednesday at the Rogers Cup, Fernando Verdasco the 9th seed lost to Jeremy Chardy. It was the second time in two career meetings that Chady has emerged victorious in their head-to-head although Verdasco came within one game of advancing. After winning the first set in a tie-break, Verdasco was serving for the match at 5-4 but could not hold. Chardy eventually closed it out 6-7(7), 7-6(5), 6-2. You can add his name to an impressive list of French players within the top hundred of the ATP rankings.

On an outside court, American Sam Querrey who has won four tournaments this year, was defeated by Kevin Anderson a qualifier from South Africa 7-6(4), 4-6, 6-4.

Thursday will be highlighted by what’s sure to be a fierce battle between David Nalbandian and Robin Soderling, as well as Federer vs Michael Llodra and Andy Murray against Gael Monfils.

Roger Federer Makes Shocking Wimbledon Exit

Roger Federer has failed to advance past the quarter-finals for a second consecutive Grand Slam tournament. The defending champion and top-seeded Federer was beaten by Tomas Berdych 6-4, 3-6, 6-1, 6-4 on Wednesday.

The shocking upset improves Berdych to 3-8 against Federer all-time, including a recent victory in Miami in March.
The growing trend of Roger losing to players he had previously dominated is continuing and the fact that it is happening on the grass of Wimbledon must be particularly alarming.

Talk of Federer’s decline has been present since 2008 when he failed to win a Grand Slam until late in the year at the U.S. Open. Then in 2009 after losing the Aussie Open final to Nadal, people really started to wonder if his dominance was wavering. Just when it seemed like that might be the case, Federer rebounded by winning his first French Open and then regaining his Wimbledon crown a year ago. He then lost the U.S. Open final to Del Potro but again bounced back in Australia earlier this year. It seemed liked Federer still had a lot of gas left in the tank.

With back-to-back quarter-final exits from the last two Slams however, the situation is starting to look dire for the world number-two player. He has not won a tournament since his lone Slam down-under and continues to get beat by players like Berdych, Lleyton Hewitt and others that he had owned until the past year.

In his post-match press conference, Federer spoke respectfully towards his opponent but revealed there were some injury issues that affected his play today.

“I think he was a bit more consistent than in the past. I lost to him in Miami this year, where it was a really tight match as well. But from my end, obviously, you know, I’m unhappy with the way I’m playing. I couldn’t play the way I wanted to play. You know, I am struggling with a little bit of a back and a leg issue. That just doesn’t quite allow me to play the way I would like to play. So it’s frustrating, to say the least. Looking forward to some rest anyway.”

Whether the injury aspect was real or imagined we’ll never know for sure. It could be Federer’s way of avoiding questions of his declining stranglehold on the men’s game.

Either way, Wimbledon will have a different champion this year and for the first time since 2002 the finals will not include Roger Federer.

HENIN REACHES SEMIFINALS AT THE UNICEF OPEN PICTORIAL

Justine Henin has reached the semifinals of the UNICEF Open in the Netherlands.  Henin is preparing for the Wimbledon tournament which kicks off next  Monday.

Henin beat German Kristina Barrois in straight sets 6-3, 6-3 before moving to the next. Henin next faces Alexandra Dulgheru of Romania who beat her opponent in three sets: 3-6, 6-3, 6-4.

Ralf Reinecke was on the scene to capture magnicifent photographs of Henin and many others.

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STOSUR SURGES AT ROLAND GARROS

By Blair Henley

A surging Sam Stosur took out four-time French Open champion and No. 22 seed Justine Henin 2-6, 6-1, 6-4 on Monday, snapping the Belgian’s streak of 24 straight matches won at Roland Garros.

“My nerves were simply not strong enough today,” Henin explained. “I felt very nervous, very upset, which is normally not the way I am. Maybe today I was feeling some nervous fatigue. Maybe that nervous fatigue prevented me from seeing things in a calmer way.”

After a slow start, 26-year-old Stosur used her heavy groundstrokes to keep her opponent stuck scrambling behind the baseline, and in the third set, Henin’s picturesque backhand was nowhere to be found. She dumped three into the net in the final game.

Stosur, seeded seventh, squandered her first match point with a nervous double fault, but took advantage of a short, bouncing overhead on her second try.

“I just tried to shake it off and tried to have a laugh at myself, not worry about it and get the next one in,” Stosur said of the double fault.

It was so gloomy at Roland Garros Monday that the 26-year-old Australian was forced to remove her signature sunglasses, allowing fans to see the emotion in her eyes as she sealed one of the biggest wins of her career.

“I knew what I had to do,” Stosur said. “I kept going for it and I believed in myself.”

Stosur had more clay court wins this season than anyone else on tour coming into the French Open and she made it to the semifinals here last year, but her win over Henin still was still unexpected. The Australian lost to her earlier this month in Stuttgart.

The Aussie was known primarily as a doubles specialist before she decided to focus on her singles a couple of years ago. She has previously held the No. 1 ranking in doubles, but she entered the singles Top 10 for the first time just months ago.

Serena Williams easily beat No. 18 seed Shahar Peer of Israel 6-2, 6-2 to become the last American standing in the singles draws. She will take on Stosur in the quarterfinals.

It’s safe to say Peer doesn’t like playing the Williams sisters. She has now lost 5 times each to both Serena and Venus.

Tuesday No. 3 seed Caroline Wozniacki will take on No. 17 Francesca Schiavone, No. 5 seed Elena Dementieva will play No. 19 Nadia Petrova.

9 FINGERED HENIN OVERCOMES JANKOVIC

When asked about things you wouldn’t want to experience in life then being beaten by a woman with 9 fingers is definitely on my list. Since I don’t actively play tennis, I guess this won’t ever happen to me. Who did experience it?  Jelena Jankovic.  I feel sorry for the girl in green. Nine she has tried to beat Justine Henin to no avail.

The endscore of the match is 3-6, 7-6 (4), 6-3 with Henin staying on course for her first title since coming out of retirement.

“She is playing the same, she is still one of the best on clay. You have to hold your ground, as soon as you lose concentration she takes advantage, she has so much experience,” said Jankovic, another former No. 1 who won the Stuttgart tournament in 2008 and was seeded fourth this time. “We both played a good match and maybe I was a little unlucky at the crucial times. I had a break point at 5-5 in the second and I was hoping to pounce on her serve but she hit one of her best serves of the match with her second serve.”, said Jelena Jankovic.

Henin analyzed her opponent and had the following to say:

“She played very consistently in the first set and I was under a lot of pressure,” Henin said. “I kept fighting and I am really happy to get through.”

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