clothing line

Serena’s Success

The semi’s might be delayed due to rain but Serena’s still a Success.  She will grace the cover of “Success” magazine this October.  Ofcourse we here at TennisGrandstand were able to get our hands on the preview of that cover.

The issue contains an interview with the multiple Grand Slam winner with insights and wisdoms on how to achieve success.  Here is a quick excerpt of that interview:

A shining example of someone who charts her own course, Serena achieves her goals her way.  “I think when you are given a great opportunity and you have the chance to do other things, you need to follow your dreams and try to make the most of your opportunities.”

Juggling tennis, a clothing line and philanthropic commitments, Serena works hard to do it all, and do it well.  “I am not doing anything for money.  I am doing because I love it.

Her secrets?

  1. Commit to doing your very best
  2. Be a good sport
  3. Don’t listen to naysayers
  4. Follow your heart
  5. Promote your work

Who was Fred Perry?

With every mention of Andy Murray at Wimbledon, the name Fred Perry soon follows. Fred is the last British man to the singles title at Wimbledon (back in 1936). The clothing line that bears his name just happens to be the clothing line that Andy Murray wears and endorses. This year also marks the 100th year since Perry’s birth. Is this adding up to a fateful conclusion to Wimbledon this year? Bud Collins, the world’s most famous and lovable tennis journalist and historian, features Perry in his famous tennis encyclopedia called THE BUD COLLINS HISTORY OF TENNIS ($35.95, New Chapter Press, www.tennistomes.com). Below is Bud’s book excerpt on Perry.

It was the technique of one particular stroke that made Fred Perry into a world champion—and probably the best tennis player Great Britain has ever produced.

The knack of making the stroke baffled the promising Briton for so long that he was on the verge of giving up in despair. He had been advised that to get very far, he would have to learn to take the ball early on his continental forehand, the racket mak­ing impact instantly as the ball rose from the court.

For months he could not master the timing. Then suddenly, like riding a bicycle, it came to him and he was on his way—on his way to the net on a running forehand, going forward with the swing of the racket to gain good volleying position if the drive did not win outright. It took him to three Wimbledon Championships, three U.S. titles, an Australian and a French title and a lucrative pro career.

Born May 18, 1909, in Stockport, England, the right-handed Frederick John Perry did not take up tennis until he was 18 years old. But he had good coaching and took to the game quickly, for he had been playing table tennis for years and winning tourna­ments and international recognition.

Perry developed an undercut backhand that came off with surprising pace. He hit the ball smartly with good length and reg­ularity on the serve, was sharp and sound with his smash, perfect in his footwork and timing, and volleyed with dispatch. None of his strokes was overpowering, but his attack was impetuous and relentless, ever challenging, and he ran like a deer in retrieving.

He was the completely equipped and efficient adversary, jaunty, a bit cocky in his breezy self-assurance, with gallery appeal. He could be sarcastic and some thought him egotistical, but it was a pose and he had an ever-ready grin. He cut a hand­some figure with his regular features, raven black hair, and phy­sique that was perfection for the game. Once he developed the stroke that had eluded him, he was virtually unstoppable.

In 1933, Perry led the British to a 4-1 win over the U.S. in the inter-zone final and to the glorious 3-2 victory over France that brought the Davis Cup back to Britain after a wait of 21 years. As Stade Roland Garros boiled with patriotic fervor, and a seventh straight Cup in the balance for the home side, Fred icily erased a set point in the second to take the last match from rookie Andre Merlin, 4-6, 8-6, 6-2, 7-5. It was the climax of the greatest individual season for a Cup winner: 12-1 in singles, 4-2 in doubles.

Britain retained the Cup through 1936 as Perry won every singles match he played in the four challenge rounds. England had not produced a Wimbledon singles champion for a quarter-century, but Perry took care of that, too. He won three straight Wimbledon finals without loss of a set, defeating defender Jack Crawford in 1934, 6-3, 6-0, 7-5, and Gottfried von Cramm in 1935, 6-2, 6-4, 6-4, and again in 1936, 6-1, 6-1, 6-0.

At Forest Hills in 1933, he was the 6-3, 11-13, 4-6, 6-0, 6-1, stop­per as Crawford reached the U.S. final with an unprecedented Grand Slam within reach. The next year, Fred might have had the first Slam himself but for a quarterfinal defeat at the French by Italy’s Giorgio de Stefani, 6-2, 1-6, 9-7, 6-2.

Perry, a 6-footer, was also impressive elsewhere, winning the U.S. Championship in 1933, 1934 and 1936 (over Don Budge in 1936, 2-6, 6-2, 8-6, 1-6, 10-8, despite two match points), an assault interrupted only in 1935, when he suffered a painful kidney injury in a fall, and lost in the semifinals to Wilmer Allison. In 1934, he won the Australian Championship defeating Crawford 6-3, 7-5, 6-1, and in 1935, he won the French over von Cramm 6-3, 3-6, 6-1, 6-3. Fred was the first player to take all four majors, finish­ing with a total of eight major singles tites.

When Perry joined the pro tour, he drew huge crowds to see him play Ellsworth Vines and Tilden. Perry won the U.S. Pro Championship in both 1938, over Bruce Barnes, 6-3, 6-2, 6-4, and 1941 over Dick Skeen, 6-4, 6-8, 6-2, 6-3.

After his playing career, he became associated with the man­ufacturer of tennis clothing that bore his name, was a tennis cor­respondent for a London newspaper and took part in radio and television coverage of tennis. He was elected to the Hall of Fame in 1975 and died Feb. 2, 1995, in Melbourne. He ranked in the world’s Top 10 from 1931 through 1936, No. 1 the last three years.

MAJOR TITLES (14)—Australian singles, 1934; French singles, 1935; Wimbledon singles. 1934-35-36; U.S. singles, 1933-34, 36; Australian doubles, 1934; French dou­bles, 1933; French mixed, 1932; Wimbledon mixed 1935-36; U.S. mixed. 1932. DAVIS CUP—1931-32-33-34-35-36, 34-4 singles, 11-3 doubles. SINGLES RECORD IN THE MAJORS—Australian (7-1), French (22-5), Wimbledon (35-5), U.S. (34-4).