ATP

Indian Wells Kicks Off 30th Year of ATP Masters 1000 Tennis

The 2019 BNP Paribas Open in Indian Wells, California ushers in the 30th year of the ATP Tour branding these elite events as “Masters 1000” events. Remember when they were called “The Super Nine?”
Indian Wells is one of seven of these such events that have been part of this elite status since the start of the modern-day ATP Tour in 1990, along with Miami, Monte Carlo, Rome, Canada, Cincinnati and Paris.

Both Novak Djokovic and Roger Federer are vying for a record-breaking sixth Indian Wells title and Djokovic will also be looking to equal Rafael Nadal’s record of 33 ATP Masters 1000 titles. Nadal also seeks a sixth trophy overall in the desert, but he has only won three singles at Indian Wells to go with two doubles titles.

Last March in Indian Wells, Novak Djokovic lost his opener to 109th-ranked qualifier Taro Daniel of Japan. Djokovic returns in 2019 as the world No. 1 and champion of the last three major tournaments and two of the last three ATP Masters 1000 events. Djokovic has not played since winning his seventh Australian Open title on January 27.

Federer held three championship points to make it six titles in Indian Wells before losing to Juan Martin del Potro in 2018. Federer enters the event on a hot streak after winning the 100th title of his career in Dubai on March 2 defeating Stefanos Tsitsipas in the final. Federer has defeated 50 different opponents for his 100 titles — 25 of whom are now retired. A fascinating stat regarding Federer and his chief rival Nadal – this marks the first time these two are playing at the same ATP Tour event (non Grand Slam event) for the first time since the 2017 Nitto ATP Finals. Federer is on a five-match win streak against Nadal, including a 6-2, 6-3 victory at 2017 Indian Wells. The two rivals could meet in the semi-finals on 16 March.

Chris Kermode ATP Exit Is The Latest Chaotic Move In Men’s Pro Tennis

by Rajagopalan Rohinee

At this point, men’s tennis seems to be a cacophony of chaos. To add to it, the hard-pressing matters are not only being played out both prominently but look to be raging just as intensely within the sport’s inner recesses. The problem is, however, that neither there is a way to pinpoint the origins of this problem nor there is an effective solution in sight.

The ousting of Chris Kermode as Association of Tennis Professionals’ Chief Executive Officer therefore has several connotations as it has various implications. But the one question it raises, first and foremost, is why now when the sport is said to be ostentatiously flourishing? In that respect, the whole “he said-he said-they said” turn of events that is being played out in the aftermath of the ATP Board Meeting in Indian Wells does not enumerate much beyond the offering of reasons as to why things happened the way they did.

So what purpose does the currently ongoing clamouring – of trying to pin the blame on Novak Djokovic and other members of the Player Council and/or on the Player Representatives – serve? For, despite the earnestness of everyone involved – both first-hand and as onlookers into the matter – there are no answers available even as pertinent scepticisms – read, vis-à-vis Justin Gimelstob’s controversial presence in the decision-making – have abounded.

The one aspect that needs to be peered into and pored over deeply, but which has been quieted down, is where does men’s tennis go from here? At the same time, the stakeholders – be it players or those responsible for its managerial side – need to introspect on what can only be considered as a failing of the sport despite its much-bandied-about successes. In isolation, this is bad news. But it worsens when juxtaposed with the mess the International Tennis Federation has inflicted upon itself.

The open rebellion dotting the ITF’s periphery by several national tennis boards, its members and (deprived) players following its Transition Tour muddle should have cautioned the ATP in a timely manner. Yet, even as the ITF finds it difficult to justify its recent actions, which have seen an unequal bartering of the Davis Cup to a soccer player, the returns from which – when filtered to its core – are non-existent to the tournament’s growth and continuity, the ATP did as it felt right.

But in trying to do what was right, the ATP came across as short-sighted, imposing restrictions on the entirety of the men’s game.

Beyond 2019, following the end of Kermode’s term, men’s tennis will have to start over from scratch. The Briton’s business acumen – giving men’s tennis widespread marketability and in turn, leading to enhanced profitability – would be a thing of the past. In the sport’s annals, it would not be a pause but a definite stopping point.
Then, whoever takes over from Kermode, will not only have the onus of living up to the standards set by his predecessor (while attempting to better it) but will also need to live up to the expectations of these stakeholders of the domain who had insisted on making the change, in the first place. Just as along those of whom – including Djokovic – who spoke about administrative changes being necessary will also be at the receiving end of scrutiny, with enquiries flowing about whether the so-called alterations netted positive results.

Djokovic is well-within his rights now to decline commenting on what his personal choice was in the voting to truncate Kermode’s role. But at that unspecified point in the future – if it does come to pass – if the changes were not to work, him and the others who were a part of the present-day decision-making would need to justify themselves as to whether their good intentions came through for the lowest-ranked player as much as for those in the top-tier. It may also be the questions that popped up in the Chris Kermode’s non-continuing-as-the-CEO melee are answered, one way or another.

Andy Murray Embodied Many Things To Many People

by Rajagopalan Rohinee

Andy Murray embodied many things to many people. He was the gritty warrior who never let up in his performances, despite the numerous defeats and setbacks that waylaid him. He was the deceptive athlete, who could vary his shot-making to suit himself and discomfit his opponent. He was also the rebel who took decisions which though seemed effortless for him, never seemed easy for others.

Of all these facets, it’s the last trait that not only set Murray apart from his peers but also carved a unique pride of place for him among them.

Be it raising his voice for the controversial referendum vote for Scottish independence from the United Kingdom – followed by an unapologetic stance reiterating his decision in the aftermath of the fallout – in 2014, or be it a demonstrative declaration of giving women in the profession – both past and present – their due, Murray never shied away from taking a stand regardless of how it may have been perceived.

At a time, when, on the subject of equal pay for women players, players either preferred to sit on the fence with displays of dubious diplomacy, or outright negated the need for the same, Murray’s unequivocal stance to speak up for the women set a precedent. Now, against the backdrop of the overwhelming emotions coming forth after his shock announcement about his impending retirement, reactions to the Briton’s viewpoint have been conveniently airbrushed. However, back when he had stood up for the cause – so to speak – Murray was cast as a pariah, by many in the same fold.

A similar turnaround has, then, been effectuated about his decision to appoint Amelie Mauresmo as his coach, between now and then. When Murray engaged Mauresmo as his coach in 2014, disparagements shrouded as banter greeted his move, pitting it as a step-down of sorts after Ivan Lendl. To the relentless critics, it did not matter that under the guidance of the Frenchwoman, Murray won his first Masters 1000 on clay – in Madrid in 2015 – or that he continued the established trend of being a fixture in the finals of the Majors (with two consecutive trips to the Australian Open final Sunday in 2015-16).

Cut to 2018, merely two years after Mauresmo and Murray parted ways, as Mauresmo resumed her coaching career by joining compatriot Lucas Pouille’s team, opinions veered towards cheers and acceptance as though it was no big deal in the scheme of things. While this was indeed a change for the better, it still hit harder that it was not the case the first time around when such unnecessary hue and cry was made about it.

At the same time, though, it is also fitting – at par with the theme of what Murray’s career has been, unbound and unfettered by conventions.

Murray started out as the beacon of deliverance for British tennis that had been long-parched, lacking a Major champion for years. And, in the decade-and-a-half that he unwound his way through the professional circuit, Murray not only lived up to those expectations – as stifling as they were at times – but also gave his country more reasons, beyond conventionality, to hope. Even beyond the scope of winning Wimbledon, as he transformed himself from an envisioned titlist at the Championships, to a multiple-time Major winner – coming close enough to completing the Grand Slam.

One looking to making the most of opportunities could do well to borrow a page from Murray’s 2016 manual, in which he pushed his body to the limits of its endurance in trying to attain the world no. 1 ranking for the first time in his career. Time, though will suck in the allure of that accomplishment just as it would blot the other numbers that form the stockpile of his career. However, Murray’s long-lasting legacy will be of being an inspiration, who was not only unfettered by conventions, but also impervious to time-bound limitations.

Alexander Zverev Shocks Novak Djokovic To Win ATP Finals In London

Alexander Zverev became the youngest champion ever at the year-end ATP Finals in a decade with his comprehensive upset of world No. 1 Novak Djokovic 6-4, 6-3 in the final.

The title marked the biggest career win for the 21-year-old German, who began working with tennis legend Ivan Lendl in late August.

Zverev became the youngest player to win at the ATP’s season finale since Djokovic in 2008. He was the first German to win the title since Boris Becker in 1995.

“This is the biggest title of my career so far. This trophy means a lot, everything, to all the players. I mean, you only have so many chances of winning it. You play against the best players only,” Zverev said. “How I played today, how I won it, for me it’s just amazing.”

One year ago, Zverev made his debut at elite eight-player event in London, falling short of reaching the semifinals. The 10-time ATP tournament title champion beat six-time champion Roger Federer in straight sets on Saturday in the semifinals. It’s the first time a player has beaten both Djokovic and Federer at the same Nitto ATP Finals. Zverev’s the first player to beat the Top 2 seeds in the semifinals and final of the event since Andre Agassi in 1990.

“It’s quite astonishing, winning this title, beating two such players back-to-back, Roger and Novak, in semi-finals and final,” Zverev said. “It means so much. I’m incredibly happy and incredibly proud of this moment right now.”

ATP, Tennis Australia Officially Launch ATP Cup

The ATP and Tennis Australia have officially unveiled the ATP Cup – a new team competition to kickstart the men’s tennis season from 2020. The tournament, which was announced during the Nitto ATP Finals in London, will be played across three Australian cities over ten days in the lead up to the Australian Open and will feature teams from 24 countries.

World No. 1 and President of the ATP Player Council Novak Djokovic was among the players who joined ATP Executive Chairman & President Chris Kermode and Craig Tiley, CEO of Tennis Australia, to reveal the details of the competition, which has been shaped through extensive consultation over several years with players, tournament organisers and sponsors. The launch also revealed the ATP Cup’s new brand identity and a promotional video to bring the plans to life.

The event sees the return of an ATP team competition into the calendar for the first time since the ATP World Team Cup, which was held in Dusseldorf from 1978-2012.

The move represents the latest initiative by ATP to innovate in the sport, as well as providing increased earning opportunities for its players, and introducing new fans to the game. The tournament will ensure every season starts with an event with a truly global profile, giving players the chance to see their nation crowned the best in the world. The 2020 ATP Cup will offer US$15 million in prize money and up to 750 ATP Rankings points to the winners.

Djokovic, who finished 2018 as year-end No.1 for a fifth time, stated: “I like that it’s owned by ATP, by the players, and that we have ranking points, and it’s going to be the best way to kick start the season. Australia is a country that has a Grand Slam, that nurtures tennis tradition. More than 90 per cent of the time we’re playing as individuals and we don’t have too many team events. This is going to bring together a lot of nations and for me personally it will be a very nice and proud moment to represent my country.”

Kermode added: “This new event fits perfectly with our strategy to innovate and look towards the future. We know from our extensive discussions with the players that the ATP Cup will provide a great way for them to open their season – bringing together the world’s best for a major team event that compliments existing scheduling, provides highly-coveted ATP ranking points and clearly links to the Australian Open. The first week of the season is when the players want to play and that’s why the tournament has their strong support. By staging the event with Tennis Australia, which is renowned for its experience as an outstanding event promoter, we know that the tournament will be a great success from year one.”

Tennis Australia CEO, Craig Tiley added: “This is an amazing opportunity, in close collaboration with the players and the tour, to deliver a globally impactful event that further elevates the sport and the fan interest in it.

“We want to keep growing tennis, give the players an environment where they can perform to the best of their abilities and then ensure they are appropriately appreciated and rewarded. This event will help us all achieve that while connecting with new generations of tennis fans. It will provide a new source of inspiration for young athletes to choose our sport.”

The format of the ATP Cup will see nations split into six groups, with eight teams emerging from the round-robin stage to compete in the knockout phase until only one team is left standing. There will be up to five players in each team, with ties comprising two singles matches and one doubles match. The criteria for entry into the ATP Cup will be based off the ATP Ranking of the No. 1 singles player from each country.

Venue announcements will be made in due course.

About The ATP
The ATP is the governing body of the men’s professional tennis circuits – the ATP World Tour, the ATP Challenger Tour and the ATP Champions Tour. With 64 tournaments in 31 countries, the ATP World Tour showcases the finest male athletes competing in the world’s most exciting venues. From Australia to Europe and the Americas to Asia, the stars of the 2018 ATP World Tour will battle for prestigious titles and ATP Rankings points at ATP World Tour Masters 1000, 500 and 250 events, as well as Grand Slams (non ATP events). At the end of the season only the world’s top 8 qualified singles players and doubles teams will qualify to compete for the last title of the season at the Nitto ATP Finals. Held at The O2 in London, the event will officially crown the 2018 ATP World Tour No. 1. For more information, please visit www.ATPWorldTour.com.

About Tennis Australia
Tennis Australia is the governing body of tennis in Australia, promoting and facilitating participation in tennis at all levels, and also conducts national and international tournaments including the Australian Open. Visit tennis.com.au for more information.

Bernie Tomic Incredibly Wins Chengdu Open

In a thrilling final match on the Centre Court of the Sichuan International Tennis Centre this evening, Australian world No. 123 Bernard Tomic saved four match points en route to a 6-1, 3-6, 7-6(7) victory over Italian world No. 13 Fabio Fognini to lift his fourth career title and first title in three years at the Chengdu Open.

The former world No. 17 Tomic started the match on the back foot, having to save two break points in the very first game, but after he broke Fognini’s serve in the next game and saved another four break points in the third game, his Italian opponent cut a frustrated figure on court and hit too many shots into the net or long.

In an intensely fought second set, 31-year-old Fognini saved break point by a hair’s breadth in the third game, with electronic review confirming the line judges ‘in’ call that was challenged by Tomic, and finally got past the Aussie’s powerful serve in the fourth game to take a 3-1 lead.

Even though Tomic immediately leveled matters with a break of his own in the next game, Fognini once again took the lead in the eighth game, when he rallied from 15-40 down to take four points on the trot before closing out the set on serve.

Both players struggled to hold serve in the first five games of the third set, with Tomic converting two out of five break points and Fognini also breaking his opponent twice, albeit in three opportunities. The players then held serve strongly to carry the match into a tense tiebreak finale.

Fognini scored three mini-breaks in the first nine points to Tomic’s one to go 6-3 up and have three match points on serve. Tomic saved all three match points with a combination of Fognini making mistakes (double faulting on the first match point), luck (his return hit the net and went over during the second match point) and an excellent forehand down the line on the third match point.

As light rain began to all, the drama continued when Fognini had another match point at 7-6 but hit his shot wide. Backed by a thrilled crowd, the momentum shifted to the Aussie who took the next three points on the trot and completed the victory with a powerful cross court forehand.

Tomic’s long path to victory in the Chengdu Open started in the qualifying rounds and included hard fought comeback victories Belarus’s Igor Gerasimov, American Bradley Klahn and South Africa’s Lloyd Harris. He also ousted seventh seed Joao Sousa in yesterday’s semifinal.

“I could have lost like five times this tournament. I was down in so many matches and faced match points against Harris in the second round as well. It’s been a rollercoaster week. Today I don’t know I saved how many match points. It was crazy. It was truly a really good match. For me to win here is huge. I’m so happy. He is a really talented player. I wish him the best to make the London masters,” said Tomic.

Fognini was despondent to have missed a chance to capture a record-breaking fourth title this season and become the first Italian to do so, but acknowledged that it wasn’t his day.

“This is sport. Sometimes you like it, sometimes not. It has been a great week, a great year for me. Now I am sad because I have lost a final with four match points but that’s the sport. Sometimes you win sometimes you don’t,” said the Italian.

Top seeded Croatian doubles pair Ivan Dodig and Mate Pavic saved their best for last here as they swept past the American-Indian duo of Austin Krajicek and Jeevan Nedunchezhiyan 6-2, 6-4 in 52 minutes to lift their second doubles title as a pair.

Former world No. 1 Pavic (achieved in May this year) and world No. 24 Dodig (career high of No. 4) saved all six break points they faced during the match, four of which came in a memorable rally from 0-40 down in the fourth game of the second set, while converting three of seven break opportunities and winning 78% of their 46 service points.

The duo, who are playing in their eighth Tour-level event together, recorded three super tiebreaker victories en route to the final and ousted tournament fourth seeds Santiago Gonzalez and Aisam-Ul-Haq Qureshi on Friday to make their fourth final appearance as a tandem.

The Chengdu Open doubles crown is Pavic’s 13th career title and fifth of this year, which includes picking up his first career Grand Slam at the Australian Open with regular world tour partner Oliver Marach. Dodig takes home his eleventh career doubles trophy and second of the year.

“Yeah, I’m feeling great. This is my first time here in Chengdu and I really enjoyed the tournament. To finish the week with this trophy is a great feeling. The win is important for us. We played good matches here. We felt great at this tournament and in general in this city. We are leaving very happy,” said 33-year-old Dodig.

“We don’t play too many matches together and it’s our second title after four finals together, so I’m happy with the title. We were playing better and better, raising the level match by match. I would say we saved the best for the last. Coming back for my second time here, I would say this tournament is great, the hotel is one of the best on tour, with great facilities and great conditions for the players. They improve year after year and hopefully I am coming back next year,” added 25-year-old Pavic.

The tournament is owned by IMG and is organized by the Chinese Tennis Association and Chengdu Municipal Government, is co-organized by Chengdu Sports Bureau, Shuangliu District Government and Chengdu Culture Tourism Group and is promoted by Sichuan Investment International Tennis Centre Development Co., Ltd., CCTV IMG (Beijing) Sports Management Co. Ltd. And WME IMG China Culture Development Co. Ltd.

The Chengdu Open is also very proud to have the distinguished support from ATP World Tour’s Premier Partner Emirates, the official player hotel St. Regis, Chengdu, which fast became a favourite of the players, the official car Audi, Dunlop tennis balls, the Sichuan Tennis International Hotel which is conveniently located adjacent to the courts and providing efficient services to the tournament, the official digital media partner iQiyi, the official apparel Erke, the official stringer Yonex, the official gym equipment Life Fitness, the official tea Sichuan Mengding Tea Co. Ltd. and the official water Ice Age.

The official tournament website www.ChengduOpenTennis.com has additional information about the tournament.

Top 5 Tennis Betting Mistakes You Must Steer Clear Of!

Once you master a few tennis betting strategies you might feel like betting on every single match. However, it’s often seen that people start betting irresponsibly and aggressively, or using dirty techniques, sometimes even altering their strategies significantly.

Although you can make use of various Tennis free betting offers to test the waters first, taking your tennis betting skills from average to professional would require you to pay a lot of attention to the logic, numbers and equations. If you’re someone serious about taking his/her tennis betting to the next level, go through the following five tennis betting mistakes and stay away from them at all cost.

Betting on every single match
Let’s admit it, betting on tennis takes the game’s thrill factor to an altogether new high. Even though this is something natural and native to gambling, you’d need to overcome it to profit from tennis betting in the long-term.

There is no need to bet on every single tennis match. It might seem tempting, but not required. The tendency of betting with fresh winnings or some spare cash just because there’s a tennis match coming up soon is silly, and far from intelligent betting. This tendency can quickly slip into the impulse betting territory.

Not analysing enough
It’s important to analyse the matches properly. You should go through the concerned players’ past performances, recent form, playing styles and other factors thoroughly.

In tennis betting, you must look at every match from different angles. All such information can be gathered easily from the Internet these days.

Opting for handicaps
It might be good to reconsider taking frequent handicaps as tennis is one sport where players improve constantly and tremendously. Though you can refer to the statistics and figure if the favourites are likely to win their matches or not, things can always take unexpected turns, and put you in unwanted situations.

It’s a good idea to avoid handicaps if they seem too good to be true or unreasonable, but they can be a huge saviour in some cases. Use them to your advantage whenever possible and stay away from them when not needed.

Indulging in accumulators
Play big accumulators if you’re someone who wants to lose every single penny and go bankrupt in quick time. Well, that’s what a lot of experts say. It’s correct too in a lot of ways.

If you wish to make good money from tennis betting and want to simultaneously keep a tight hold on your winnings, try sticking to single bets only. In case you just can’t avoid accumulators, don’t include more than three matches in your bets. There is no way people can consistently win with accumulators, simply because sports betting is highly unpredictable in nature.

Being biased
Once you’ve spent a considerable time betting on tennis, you’d know that it’s mostly about statistics, logic and figures. Hence, the worst thing anyone can do is bet based on his/her biases and emotions. For instance, a lot of Roger Federer fans would blindly back him at the French Open, even if it was Rafael Nadal, the King of clay on the opposite end of the court!

In fact, logic is all about taking any personal bias out of the equation completely. You’d be setting yourself up for major disaster if you allow your feelings to get the better of you.

Former ATP Pros, Senior Aspirants Invited To Compete at Jack Kramer Club in Los Angeles March 1-4

Former ATP World Tour ranked tennis professionals and aspiring competitive players age 40 and over are invited to participate in a special senior prize money tennis tournament March 1-4 at the Jack Kramer Tennis Club in Rolling Hills Estates, Calif., 20 miles from downtown Los Angeles.

The Jack Kramer Club Past Masters Challenge will feature a 40-and-over singles tournament and a 50-and-over doubles tournament with prize money being awarded to singles and doubles semifinalists, finalists and champions. Prize money amounts will be determined based on a prize money pot that will be made up of tournament entry fees as well as fees raised through tournament competitors participating in pro-am, hit-with-the-pros sessions with patrons.

Former Top 50 professional 2000 U.S. Olympic team member Jeff Tarango, the new director of tennis at the Kramer Club, will be playing and hosting the event.

Players who ranked in the top 50 of the ATP singles rankings in their careers who enter the event will receive a bye into the singles semifinals of the event and if there are more than three who enter, they will receive a bye into the quarterfinals or another appropriate round based on the number of players of this level entered into the event. Former top 20 doubles players and their partners will be accorded the same in the doubles competition. All other entries, whether former ATP ranked players who did not receive a top 50 singles ranking or top 20 doubles ranking or are an aspiring competitive tournament players who did not receive a world ranking, will compete in a feed-in draw. ALL ENTRIES FOR ANY PLAYER WHO MEET AGE REQUIREMENTS WILL BE ACCEPTED. THIS IS AN OPEN TOURNAMENT.Matches will be best-of-three FAST4 sets (first to four games, tie-breaker at 3-3, no-ad scoring)

“This is a fascinating grass roots effort to create some competitive playing opportunities for money for former ATP touring professionals,” said Tarango, who reached a career high singles ranking of No. 42 in 1992. “It’s very appropriate that we are hosting an event like this at the Jack Kramer Club as Kramer was perhaps the premier pro tennis promoter and many of the early pro events that he played in and later promoted had the competing players dividing portions of the profits of the event. I look forward to seeing many players competing at the Jack Kramer Club in March and hope that more of these type of events can be hosted in the future.”

To sign up for the event, go to this link: https://campscui.active.com/orgs/TennisGrandStand?orglink=camps-registration

Entries will close on Friday, February 23. Former Top 100 ranked ATP singles players will have entry fees waived if they participate in at least one one-hour pro-am, clinic or hit with the pros opportunity with amateurs or pay $95 “ante” entry fee to compete in the singles event. For all other entrants (whether former ATP ranked singles, doubles players or tournament players who did not earn ATP rankings), the entry fee (or “ante”) is $95 for singles and $150 per doubles team and players must be available to participate in at least one one-hour pro-am, clinic or hit-with-the-pros session.

Amateurs who would like to play in the one-hour pro-am, clinic or hit-with-the pros sessions will cost $90, which includes admission to the club for the day and admission to watch the matches. To sign up, click here: https://campscui.active.com/orgs/TennisGrandStand?orglink=camps-registration

All entry fees and pro-am fees go into a “prize money pot” that will be used to award prize money to the singles and doubles players. The more tournament entries there are and the most pro-am players there are, the more then prize money will be, so participating players are encouraged to promote and market the event themselves, encourage fellow players to enter the tournament or participate in the hit-with-the-pros events.

The prize money breakdown is as follows:

 

Singles winner (40-and-over): 15 percent of the “pot” and runner-up gets 7.5 percent

Singles semifinalists get 4 percent of the “pot”

 

Doubles winner (50-and-over): 10 percent (split) of the “pot” and runner-up splits 5 percent

Doubles semifinalists split 2 percent of the “pot” each

 

Remaining portion of the pot goes to administrative fees, costs, the club/promoter

 

Schedule of Play

Thursday, March 1

Opening round singles and doubles matches starting at Noon (special requests for match times will be considered)

 

Friday, March 2

Second day of singles and doubles matches starting at Noon (special requests for match times will be considered, flexible)

Pro-Am/Hit-with-Pros/Clinic can be scheduled if needed

 

Saturday, March 3

Pro-Am/Hit-with-Pros/Clinic at 11 am

Doubles semifinals starting at noon (simultaneously or one after another) and final to follow at about 3 pm (FAST4 sets, can be flexible)

Third day of singles matches, quarterfinal matches to start at  1 pm or so (flexible)

 

Sunday, March 4

Pro-Am/Hit-with-Pros/Clinic at 11 am

Singles semifinals starting at noon (simultaneously or one after another) and final to follow at about 3 pm (FAST4 sets, can be flexible)

 

Founded in 1962 during the golden era of tennis by legendary tennis player and promoter Jack Kramer and famed tennis coach Vic Braden, the Jack Kramer Club was the created to be a hub for developing tennis champions in a family focused club environment. The club features 13 tennis courts, a fitness center, an Olympic swimming pool and an iconic South Bay clubhouse. The club was focused on building tennis champions and succeeded as Pete Sampras, Tracy Austin, Lindsay Davenport, Eliot Teltscher among others.

beINSPORTS Announces Coverage of WTA Tour, ATP Tour Tennis for 2018

Are you a tennis fan in the United States searching for TV coverage of the WTA Tour? Check out beIN SPORTS  The network released its programming lineup for the 2018 season of the Women’s Tennis Association (WTA) and the Association of Tennis Professionals (ATP) events.

beIN SPORTS will offer exclusive live coverage of 44 tennis tournaments, (39 WTA + 5 ATP), from 26 different countries. The coverage will be easily accessible across beIN SPORTS television channels and on beIN SPORTS CONNECT, the network’s online streaming service, which features a dedicated tennis channel (beIN SPORTS CONNECT 10).

The championship matches of the Premier events in Doha, Dubai, Stuttgart, Madrid, Rome, Wuhan, Beijing and Singapore will air live on the beIN SPORTS US YouTube channel, which will be embedded on the beIN SPORTS homepage. Furthermore, finals of Premier events and events in Hispanic countries will also be broadcasted on beIN SPORTS en Español.

Coverage begins on Monday, January 1st, with the Brisbane Tournament, live from Australia. For live match schedules, please visit www.beinsports.com/us/tv-guide.

Below please find the beIN SPORTS schedule for the WTA 2018 season.

WTA 2018 Schedule
DATETOURNAMENTLOCATIONTYPE
January 1Brisbane InternationalBrisbane, AustraliaPremier
January 1Shenzhen OpenShenzhen, ChinaInternational
January 2ASB ClassicAuckland, New ZealandInternational
January 8Sydney InternationalSydney, AustraliaPremier
January 8Hobart InternationalHobart, AustraliaInternational
January 29St. Petersburg Ladies TrophySt. Petersburg, RussiaPremier 5
February 4Taiwan OpenTaipei, TaiwanInternational
February 12Qatar OpenDoha, QatarPremier
February 19Dubai Duty Free Tennis ChampionshipsDubai, United Arab EmiratesPremier
February 26Abierto MexicanoAcapulco, MexicoInternational
April 3Abierto Monterrey AfirmeMonterrey, MexicoInternational
April 10Claro Open ColsanitasBogota, ColombiaInternational
April 10Ladies Open LuganoLugano, SwitzerlandInternational
April 23Porsche Tennis Grand PrixStuttgart, GermanyPremier
April 26TEB BNP Paribas Istanbul CupIstanbul, TurkeyInternational
May 2J&T Banka Prague OpenPrague, Czech RepublicInternational
May 2Grand Prix SAR La Princesse Lalla MeryemRabat, MoroccoInternational
May 7Mutus Madrid OpenMadrid, SpainPremier Mandatory
May 14International BNL d’ItaliaRome, ItalyPremier 5
May 23Internationaoux de StrasbourgStrasbourg, FranceInternational
June 14Ricoh Open‘s-Hertogenbosch, NetherlandsInternational
June 18Aegon Classic BirminghamBirmingham, EnglandPremier
June 19Mallorca OpenMallorca, SpainInternational
June 25The InternationalEastbourne, EnglandPremier
July 19Bucharest OpenBucharest, RomaniaInternational
July 2301 Properties Moscow OpenMoscow, RussiaInternational
July 23Jiangxi OpenNanchang, ChinaInternational
August 6Rogers CupMontreal, CanadaPremier 5
September 13Japan Women’s Open TennisHiroshima, JapanInternational
September 17Toray Pan Pacific OpenTokyo, JapanPremier
September 19Guangzhou International Women’s OpenGuangzhou, ChinaInternational
September 20Korea OpenSeoul, South KoreaInternational
September 24Wuhan OpenWuhan, ChinaPremier 5
September 26Tashkent OpenTashkent, UzbekistanInternational
October 1China OpenBeijing, ChinaInternational
October 11Prudential Hong Kong Tennis OpenHong Kong, ChinaInternational
October 15Kremlin CupMoscow, RussiaPremier
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Andy Murray Could Overtake Djokovic To Become No. 1

Who would have thought that Andy Murray would get this close to becoming the Number one Tennis Player in the world? The online tennis odds of Murray reaching the summit were never high.

His rivals were simply too good; however, it looks like Murray has overcome all obstacles to finally come within striking distance of the top spot. A long time ago, seven years ago to be exact, Andy Murray reached the No.2 spot in the rankings.

And that lit a fire in him, a desire to climb over opponents like Roger Federer to finally make it to the top. And the fact that he has come so close is nothing to scoff at; because Murray can literally touch his objective considering just how close he is to the top.

And with rivals like Rafael Nadal and Novak Djokovic, it says a lot about Murray that he has climbed so far up the rankings. The only thing standing in his way is the Paris Masters. If Murray can win there and Djokovic fails to reach the final, then Murray will become the top-ranked Tennis player in the World for the first time in his career.

Of course, with the sort of pressure such a prospect can attract, Murray cannot afford to dwell on it, and he said as much in a recent interview. He cannot think about it too much, not when he has matches to prepare for in the immediate future.

Murray is right in thinking that he has no control over whether or not he becomes the Top-Ranked player. As things stand, Murray could win all his matches and still fail to become No.1.

Novak still holds all the cards; he can still waylay Murray’s journey to the top. Luckily for Murray, he hasn’t made becoming No.1 an obsession, which can happen sometimes. He has simply focused on doing his best in each and every game. He has no intention of acting any different from what he has done for the last couple of weeks.

That isn’t to say that Murray is completely brushing aside the idea of actually becoming No.1. Even if Andy were to strive to become the Top-Ranked player in the world, he doesn’t think he can achieve that goal before early 2017 at best. The prospect of reaching that goal this week seems unlikely for Murray.

This season has been good to Murray, allowing him to exceed many of his own records by winning seven titles; however, Novak has also performed astoundingly in 2016. If Murray does become Number one, he would be the oldest person to do so (at age 29) since John Newcombe who took the spot in 1974 when he was 30.

Murray is confident in his abilities and definitely, believes that he deserves the top spot. The last few months have seen Murray perform at his absolute best.

Last year’s Paris Masters didn’t end well for Murray who lost to Novak in the final; now, Murray will face Fernando Verdasco in the second round. Even with his victories at the Olympics and in Vienna, there is no way of telling whether or not Murray will end 2016 as the top-ranked player in tennis.