Arantxa Sanchez

Monica Seles – Head of the Class

Monica is “head of the class” of the 2009 group of inductees in the International Tennis Hall of Fame. She won nine major singles titles in her career – including four titles at the Australian Open. Her classmates are super agent Donald Dell, former French Open champion Andres Gimeno and Dr. Robert “Whirwind” Johnson. Bud Collins, himself a 1994 inductee into the International Tennis Hall of Fame, and the author of the definitive tennis encyclopedia THE BUD COLLINS HISTORY OF TENNIS, summarizes Seles and her career in this excerpt from his book.

How could anybody stop her? An all-time prodigy, a unique No. 1 with her double-barrelled fusillades—both hands on both sides—Monica Seles was a 19-year-old tearing up tennis until that fateful day in Hamburg, April 30, 1993. An allegedly demented German spectator, Guenther Parche, stopped her, struck her down with a knife in the back as she sat beside the court on a changeover.

The quarterfinal match against Maggie Maleeva ended at that abrupt moment, and so did tennis for a kid who seemed des­tined to be the greatest of all. She had won eight majors (three French, three Australian, two U.S.). After taking the U.S. of 1992 over Arantxa Sanchez Vicario, 6-3, 6-3, she was the youngest ever to hold seven of them (18 years, eight months), undercutting Maureen Connolly by three months. (Curiously, Connolly, who wound up with nine, had been cut off, too, as a teenager, in a traf­fic accident.) Breaking Steffi Graf’s four-year hold on the No. 1 ranking in 1991, Seles had held off Steffi in her last major appear­ance before her stabbing, to win the Australian, 4-6, 6-3, 6-2.

But putative assassin Parche intervened, claiming he knifed Seles to restore Graf to preeminence, a story the Seles family doubted. It was 28 months before Monica was seen on court again. The psychological damage had been more severe than the physical. She, like everybody else—except, apparently, the judge in Parche’s trial and re-trial—wondered why he was not incarcer­ated. “He’s still out there walking the streets,” she worried.

Attempting to put it behind her, Monica re-emerged in August 1995, beating Martina Navratilova in an exhibition at Atlantic City, content with the co-No. 1 ranking with Graf granted her by the WTA. Then acting as though nothing had changed, she was back in business—electrifyingly so. Opponents at the Cana­dian Open in Toronto acted as though they were seeing a ghost. They were—a ghost of championships past—as she marched to the title on a loss of no sets, 12 games in five matches, ripping Amanda Coetzer in the final, 6-0, 6-1.

On to the US Open, where she’d won 14 straight matches. The opposition continued to melt until the final, where Graf ended the streak at 20, fitter in the third set, 7-6 (8-6), 0-6, 6-3. At 6-5 in the tie-breaker, Monica groused at a call of fault on her bid—a frac­tion wide—for a set-point ace. She lost her composure momen­tarily, and may have missed the title by a smidgen of an inch.

Her return to Australia, where she’d never been beaten, was triumphant. She won Sydney from match point down over Lind­say Davenport, 4-6, 7-6 (9-7), 6-3, then the Open (Graf was absent) over Anke Huber, 6-4, 6-1, a ninth major title. However, after that, the 1996 season didn’t go as well as she and her fans had hoped. Knee and shoulder injuries were bothersome. Her conditioning was suspect; she pulled out of several tourneys. Though she did win three more tournaments and help the U.S. regain the Federa­tion Cup, there was disappointment at the French and Wimble­don. Jana Novotna clipped her Paris streak of 25 in the quarters, 7-6 (9-7), 6-3. More painful perhaps was losing the last four games and a second-rounder at the Big W to an unknown Slovak, No. 59 Katerina Studenikova, 7-5, 5-7, 6-4. “I’m playing too defensively, not attacking the ball the way I used to,” Monica said accurately. She was a finalist again at the U.S. Open but was pushed around by a charged-up Graf whose superior quickness showed, 7-5, 6-4.

Seles, a left-hander who has grown to nearly six feet, was born Dec. 2, 1973, of Serbo-Hungarian parentage, at Novi Sad in what was then Yugoslavia. Getting her started, her father, Karolj Seles, a professional cartoonist and keen student of the game, drew faces on the balls for her to hit. He and her mother, Esther, felt her future lay in the United States They moved to Nick Bollettieri’s Tennis Academy at Bradenton, Fla., in 1986 when Monica was 12, and headmaster Nick oversaw her early development. Papa took over the coaching again at their Sara­sota residence until his death in 1998. Monica became a U.S. citizen in 1995.

Monica sounded the alarm in 1989 as a 15-year-old by spoil­ing the last final of Chris Evert’s illustrious career in. Houston, 3-6, 6-1, 6-4. “She’s the next,” exulted an overwhelmed witness, his­torian Ted Tinling. Soon after, “Moanin’ Monica” took her bubbly grimacing-and-grunting act to Roland Garros to show Parisians noisy tennis nouvelle: rip-roaring groundies, bludgeoned from. anywhere in a baseball switch-hitting style (the backhand cross-handed). She constantly went for winners, seemingly off-balance and out-of-position but buoyed by excellent footwork and antici­pation. Graf barely escaped in the semis. But she wouldn’t a year later, in the final, 7-6 (8-6), 6-4. Seles became a major player. She bounded into the world’s Top 10 in 1989 (No. 6) and was there through 2002, 13 years, (except for non- ranked 1994): No. 2 in 1990; No. 1 in 1991-92; No. 8 in 1993; co-No. 1 in 1995; co-No. 2 in 1996; No. 5 in 1997; No. 6 in 1998; No. 4 in 1999-2000; No. 10 in 2001; No. 7 in 2002.

For two-and-a-half years Monica was nearly invincible as the titles piled up and her ball-impacting shriek—“Uhh-eee!”—was heard across the globe. She charmed the public with girlish elan and mystified people by vanishing before Wimbledon in 1991 and then resurfacing to win the U.S. Open. She may have been psyched out of a 1992 Grand Slam when complaints about the grunting from Wimbledon victims, Nathalie Tauziat and Martina Navratilova, (leading to a warning from the referee) muted her in the final, where she was destroyed by Graf, 6-2, 6-1. Still, she was the first to win three majors in successive years since Mar­garet Court (three and four, 1969-70), a feat equaled by Graf in 1995-96. Among her souvenirs was the 1991 U.S. final, when at age 17, she defeated Navratilova, 34, a singular generation gapper, 7-6 (9-7), 6-1. Her brightest seasons of 10 singles titles each were 1991 (winning 74 of 80 matches) and 1992 (70 of 75).

At the close of 2003, after 12 pro seasons, and portions of two others, she had played 177 tournaments and won 53 singles titles with a 595-122 won-loss record (.836); 180-31 in the majors (.861). She has also won six doubles titles with a 89-45 won-loss record and earned $14,891,762 in prize money. She won a singles bronze at the 2000 Olympics, and won her last title, Madrid over Chanda Rubin 6-4, 6-2, in 2002. She was inactive after 2003, and announced her retirement in 2008. An exemplary figure who has coped well with much adver­sity, including several injuries, she was not the player she might have been, yet is clearly, constantly upbeat, saying, “Tennis will never end for me because I love it so much. When my profes­sional career is over I will continue to play all my life.” Monica has put an indelible signature on the game with her style, per­sona and championships, a woman doubtless on a journey to the Hall of Fame.

MAJOR TITLES (9)—Australian singles, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1996; French singles, 1990, 1991, 1992; US. singles, 1991, 1992.

FEDERATION CUP—1995-96, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2002

SINGLES RECORD IN THE MAJORS— Australian (43-4), French (54-8), Wimbledon (30-9), U.S. (54-10).

The Origins Of Olympic Tennis

Some say that tennis is relatively new sport in the Olympic Games. However, tennis was one of the nine sports on the original Olympic program at the first Modern Olympics in 1896 in Athens, Greece. The first Olympic tennis champion was John Boland, an Irishmen vacationing in Greece at the time of the first Modern Games. He entered into the tennis competition upon the urging of a Greek classmate from Oxford. Boland, who would later found the University of Ireland and serve Britain as a member of Parliament, won the singles competition in an eight-man field and paired with a German, Fritz Traun, to sweep the doubles title.

Tennis was a fixture on the Olympic program through the 1924 Games in Paris. The International Tennis Federation – the international governing body for tennis – and the International Olympic Committee saw differences on the definition of amateurism, and on whether Wimbledon should be played in Olympic years. What resulted was the exclusion of tennis from the Olympic Games as an official medal sport until 1988 in Seoul, South Korea.

Tennis triumphantly returned to the Olympic Games in 1988 in Seoul, becoming the first Olympic sport to allow professionals to compete (Basketball followed suit in 1992). Steffi Graf of West Germany completed the rarest feat in the sport by capping a “Golden Slam” at the Seoul Games, having won all four major titles in professional tennis heading into the 1988 Games.

A compilation of Olympic tennis results and medalists are compiled below…

1896 – ATHENS, GREECE

MEDALISTS

Men’s Singles

GOLD — John Boland (Great Britain)

SILVER — Demis Kastaglis (Greece)

BRONZE — Momcsillo Topavicza (Hungary)

Men’s Doubles

GOLD — John Boland (Great Britain) and Fritz Traun (Germany)

SILVER — Demis Kasdaglis and Demetrious Petrokokkinos (Greece)

BRONZE — Edwin Hack (Australia) and George Robertson (Great Britain)

RESULTS

Men’s Singles Gold Medal Match— John Boland (Great Britain) def. Demis Kastaglis (Greece), 7-5, 6-4, 6-1.

Men’s Doubles Gold Medal Match— John Boland (Great Britain) and Fritz Traun (Germany) d. Demis Kasdaglis and Demetrios Petrokokkinos (Greece), 6-2, 6-4.

1900 – PARIS, FRANCE

MEDALISTS

Men’s Singles

GOLD — Laurie Doherty (Great Britain)

SILVER — Harold Mahony (Great Britain)

BRONZE — Reggie Doherty (Great Britain)

A.B.J. Norris (Great Britain)

Men’s Doubles

GOLD — Reggie Doherty and Laurie Doherty (Great Britain)

SILVER — Spalding de Garmendia (United States) and Max Decugis (France)

BRONZE — G. de la Chapelle and Andre Prevost (France)

Harold Mahony and A.B.J. Norris (Great Britain)

Women’s Singles

GOLD — Charlotte Cooper (Great Britain)

SILVER — Helene Prevost (France)

BRONZE — Marion Jones (United States)

Hedwig Rosenbaum (Bohemia)

Mixed Doubles

GOLD — Charlotte Cooper and Reggie Doherty (Great Britain)

SILVER — Helene Prevost (France) and Harold Mahony (Great Britain)

BRONZE — Hedwig Rosenbaum (Bohemia) and Archibald Walden (Great Britain)

Laurie Doherty (Great Britain) and Marion Jones (United States)

RESULTS

Men’s Singles Gold Medal Match — Laurie Doherty (Great Britain) def. Harold Mahony (Great Britain), 6-4, 6-2, 6-3.

Men’s Doubles Gold Medal Match— Reggie Doherty-Laurie Doherty (Great Britain) def. Spalding de Garmendia (United States) and Max Decugis (France), 6-3, 6-3, 7-5

Women’s Singles Gold Medal Match — Charlotte Cooper (Great Britain) def. Helene Prevost (France), 6-3, 6-3, 7-5.

Mixed Doubles Gold Medal Match — Charlotte Cooper and Reggie Doherty (Great Britain) def. Helene Prevost (France) and Harold Mahony (Great Britain), 6-2, 6-4.

1904 – ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI, UNITED STATES

MEDALISTS

Men’s Singles

GOLD — Beals Wright (United States)

SILVER — Robert LeRoy (United States)

BRONZE — Alphonso Bell (United States) and Edgar Leonard (United States)

Men’s Doubles

GOLD — Edgar Leonard and Beals Wright (United States)

SILVER — Alphonso Bell and Robert LeRoy (United States)

BRONZE — Joseph Wear and Allen West (United States)

Clarence Gamble and Arthur Wear (United States)

RESULTS

Men’s Singles Gold Medal Match — Beals Wright (United States) def. Robert LeRoy (United States) 6-4, 6-4.

Men’s Doubles Gold Medal Match — Edgar Leonard and Beals Wright (United States) def. Alphonso Bell and Robert LeRoy (United States), 6-4, 6-4, 6-2.

1908 – LONDON, ENGLAND (Outdoor)

MEDALISTS

Men’s Singles

GOLD – Josiah Ritchie(Great Britain)

SILVER – Otto Froitzheim (Germany)

BRONZE – Wilberforce Eaves (Great Britain)

Men’s Doubles

GOLD — George Hillyard and Reggie Doherty (Great Britain)

SILVER — Josiah Richie and James Parke (Great Britain)

BRONZE — Charles Cazalet and Charles Dixon (Great Britain)

Women’s Singles

GOLD — Dorothea Chambers (Great Britain)

SILVER — Penelope Boothby (Great Britain)

BRONZE — Joan Winch (Great Britain)

RESULTS

Men’s Singles Gold Medal Match – Josiah Ritchie (Great Britain) def. Otto Froitzheim (Germany), 7-5, 6-3, 6-4

Men’s Singles Bronze Medal Match – Wilberforce Eaves (Great Britain) def. Ivie John Richardson (South Africa), 6-2, 6-2, 6-3.

Men’s Doubles Gold Medal Match — George Hillyard and Reggie Doherty (Great Britain) def. Josiah Richie and James Parke (Great Britain) 9-7, 7-5, 9-7.

Women’s Singles Gold Medal Match — Dorothea Chambers (Great Britain) def. Penelope Boothby (Great Britain), 6-1, 7-5.

1908 – LONDON, ENGLAND — (Indoor)

MEDALISTS

Men’s Singles

GOLD — Arthur Gore (Great Britain)

SILVER — George Caridia (Great Britain)

BRONZE — Josiah Ritchie (Great Britain)

Men’s Doubles

GOLD — Arthur Gore and Herbert Barrett (Great Britain)

SILVER — George Simond and George Caridia (Great Britain)

BRONZE — Wollmar Bostrom and Gunnar Setterwall (Sweden)

Women’s Singles

GOLD — Gwendoline Smith (Great Britain)

SILVER — Angela Greene (Great Britain)

BRONZE — Martha Adlerstraille (Sweden)

RESULTS

Men’s Singles Gold Medal Match — Arthur Gore (Great Britain) def. George Caridia (Great Britain), 6-3, 7-5, 6-4.

Men’s Doubles Gold Medal Match — Arthur Gore and Herbert Barrett (Great Britain) def. George Simond and George Caridia (Great Britain), 6-2, 2-6, 6-3, 6-3.

Women’s Singles Gold Medal Match — Gwendoline Smith (Great Britain) def. Angela Greene (Great Britain), 6-2, 4-6, 6-0.

1912 – STOCKHOLM, SWEDEN (Outdoor)

MEDALISTS

Men’s Singles

GOLD — Charles Winslow (South Africa)

SILVER — Harold Kitson (South Africa)

BRONZE — Oskar Kreuzer (Germany)

Men’s Doubles

GOLD — Charles Winslow and Harold Kitson (South Africa)

SILVER — Felix Pipes and Arthur Zborzil (Austria)

BRONZE — A. Canet and M. Meny (France)

Women’s Singles

GOLD — Marguerite Broquedis (France)

SILVER — Dora Koring (Germany)

BRONZE — Molla Bjurstedt (Norway)

Mixed Doubles

GOLD — Heinrich Schomburgk and Dora Koring (Germany)

SILVER — Gunnar Setterwall and Sigrid Fick (Sweden)

BRONZE — A. Canet and Marguerite Broquedis (France)

RESULTS

Men’s Singles Gold Medal Match — Charles Winslow (South Africa) def. Harold Kitson (South Africa), 7-5, 4-6, 10-8, 8-6.

Men’s Singles Bronze Medal Match – Oskar Kreuzer (Germany) def. Ladislav Zemla (BOH), 6-2, 3-6, 6-3, 6-1

Men’s Doubles Gold Medal Match — Charles Winslow and Harold Kitson (South Africa) def. Felix Pipes and Arthur Zborzil (Austria), 4-6, 6-1, 6-2, 6-2.

Women’s Singles Gold Medal Match — Marguerite Broquedis (France) def. Dora Koring (Germany), 4-6, 6-3, 6-4.

Mixed Doubles Gold Medal Match — Dora Koring and Heinrich Schomburgk (Germany) def. Sigrid Fick and Gunnar Setterwall (Sweden), 6-4, 6-0.

1912 – STOCKHOLM, SWEDEN (Indoor)

MEDALISTS

Men’s Singles

GOLD — Andre Gobert (France)

SILVER — Charles Dixon (Great Britain)

BRONZE — Anthony Wilding (Australia)

Men’s Doubles

GOLD — Andre Gobert and Maurice Germot (France)

SILVER — Gunnar Setterwall and Carl Kempe (Sweden)

BRONZE — Arthur Beamish and Charles Dixon (Great Britain)

Women’s Singles

GOLD — Edith Hannam (Great Britain)

SILVER — Thora Gerda Sophy Castenschiold (Denmark)

BRONZE — Mabel Parton (Great Britain)

RESULTS

Men’s Singles Gold Medal Match — Andre Gobert (France) def. Charles Dixon (Great Britain), 8-6, 6-4, 6-4.

Men’s Singles Bronze Medal Match – Anthony Wilding (Australia) def. Gordon Lowe (Great Britain), 4-6, 6-2, 7-5, 6-0

Men’s Doubles Gold Medal Match— Andre Gobert and Maurice Germot (France) def. Gunnar Setterwall and Carl Kempe (Sweden), 6-4, 12-14, 6-2, 6-4.

Women’s Singles Gold Medal Match — Edith Hannam (Great Britain) def. Thora Gerda Sophy Castenschiold (Denmark), 6-4, 6-3.

Mixed Doubles Gold Medal Match — Edith Hannam and Charles Dixon (Great Britain) def. Helen Aitchison and Roper Barrett (Great Britain), 6-4, 3-6, 6-2.

1920 – ANTWERP, BELGIUM

MEDALISTS

Men’s Singles

GOLD — Louis Raymond (South Africa)

SILVER — Ichiya Kumagae (Japan)

BRONZE — Charles Winslow (South Africa)

Men’s Doubles

GOLD — Noel Turnbull (South Africa) and Max Woosnam (Great Britain)

SILVER — Seiichiro Kashio and Ichiya Kumagae (Japan)

BRONZE — Pierre Albarran and Max Decugis (France)

Women’s Singles

GOLD — Suzanne Lenglen (France)

SILVER — Dorothy Holman (Great Britain)

BRONZE — Kitty McKane (Great Britain)

Women’s Doubles

GOLD — Kitty McKane and Winifred McNair (Great Britain)

SILVER — Geraldine Beamish and Dorothy Holman (Great Britain)

BRONZE — Elizabeth D’Ayen and Suzanne Lenglen (France)

Mixed Doubles

GOLD — Suzanne Lenglen and Max Decugis (France)

SILVER — Kitty McKane and Max Woosnam (Great Britain)

BRONZE — Milade Skrbkova and Razny Zemie (Czechoslovakia)

RESULTS

Men’s Singles Gold Medal Match— Louis Raymond (South Africa) def. Ichiya Kumagae (Japan), 5-7, 6-4, 7-5, 6-4.

Men’s Doubles Gold Medal Match — Noel Turnbull (South Africa) and Max Woosnam (Great Britain), def. Seiichiro Kashio and Ichiya Kumagae (Japan), 6-2, 7-5, 7-5.

Women’s Singles Gold Medal Match — Suzanne Lenglen (France) def. Dorothy Holman (Great Britain), 6-3, 6-0.

Women’s Doubles Gold Medal Match — Kitty McKane and Winifred McNair (Great Britain) def. Geraldine Beamish and Dorothy Holman (Great Britain), 8-6, 6-4.

Mixed Doubles Gold Medal Match — Suzanne Lenglen and Max Decugis (France) def. Kitty McKane and Max Woosnam (Great Britain), 6-4, 6-2.

1924 – PARIS, FRANCE

MEDALISTS

Men’s Singles

GOLD –Vincent Richards (United States)

SILVER — Henri Cochet (France)

BRONZE — Umberto Luigi de Morpurgo (Italy)

Men’s Doubles

GOLD — Vincent Richards and Frank Hunter (United States)

SILVER — Jacques Brugnon and Henri Cochet (France)

BRONZE — Jean Borotra and Rene Lacoste (France)

Women’s Singles

GOLD — Helen Wills (United States)

SILVER — Didi Vlastro (France)

BRONZE — Kitty McKane (Great Britain)

Women’s Doubles

GOLD — Helen Wills and Hazel Hotchkiss Wightman (United States)

SILVER — Kitty McKane and Dorothy Covell (Great Britain)

BRONZE — Evelyn Colyer and Dorothy Shepherd Barron (Great Britain)

Mixed Doubles

GOLD — Hazel Hotchkiss Wightman and R. Norris Williams (United States)

SILVER — Marion Jessup and Vincent Richards (United States)

BRONZE — Hendrik Timmer and Cornelia Bouman (Netherlands)

RESULTS

Men’s Singles Gold Medal Match — Vincent Richards (United States) def. Henri Cochet (France), 6-4, 6-4, 4-6, 5-7, 6-2.

Men’s Singles Bronze Medal Match – Umberto Luigi de Morpurgo (Italy) def. Jean Borotra (France), 1-6, 6-1, 8-6, 4-6, 7-5

Men’s Doubles Gold Medal Match — Vincent Richards and Frank Hunter (United States) def. Jacques Brugnon and Henri Cochet (France), 4-6, 6-2, 6-3, 2-6, 6-3.

Women’s Singles Gold Medal Match— Helen Wills (United States) def. Didi Vlastro (France), 6-2, 6-2.

Women’s Doubles Gold Medal Match — Helen Wills and Hazel Hotchkiss Wightman (United States) def. Kitty McKane and Dorothy Covell (Great Britain), 7-5, 8-6.

Mixed Doubles Gold Medal Match — Hazel Hotchkiss Wightman and R. Norris Williams (United States) def. Marion Jessup and Vincent Richards (United States), 6-2, 6-3.

1988 – SEOUL, SOUTH KOREA

MEDALISTS

Men’s Singles

GOLD — Miloslav Mecir (Czechoslovakia)

SILVER — Tim Mayotte (United States)

BRONZE — Stefan Edberg (Sweden)

Brad Gilbert (United States)

Men’s Doubles

GOLD — Ken Flach and Robert Seguso (United States)

SILVER –Sergio Casal and Emilio Sanchez (Spain)

BRONZE — Stefan Edberg and Anders Jarryd (Sweden)

Miloslav Mecir and Milan Srejber (Czechoslovakia)

Women’s Singles

GOLD — Steffi Graf (West Germany)

SILVER — Gabriela Sabatini (Argentina)

BRONZE — Zina Garrison (United States)

Manuela Maleeva (Bulgaria)

Women’s Doubles

GOLD — Zina Garrison and Pam Shriver (United States)

SILVER — Jana Novotna and Helena Sukova (Czechoslovakia)

BRONZE — Liz Smylie and Wendy Turnbull (Australia)

Steffi Graf and Claudia Kohde Kilsch (Germany)

RESULTS

Men’s Singles Gold Medal Match — Miloslav Mecir (Czechoslovakia) def. Tim Mayotte (United States), 3-6, 6-2, 6-4, 6-2.

Men’s Doubles Gold Medal Match — Ken Flach and Robert Seguso (United States) def. Sergio Casal and Emilio Sanchez (Spain), 6-3, 6-4, 6-7 (5-7), 6-7 (1-7), 9-7.

Women’s Singles Gold Medal Match — Steffi Graf (West Germany) def. Gabriela Sabatini (Argentina), 6-3, 6-3.

Women’s Doubles Gold Medal Match — Zina Garrison and Pam Shriver (United States) def. Jana Novotna and Helena Sukova (Czechoslovakia), 4-6, 6-2, 10-8.

1992 – BARCELONA, SPAIN

MEDALISTS

Men’s Singles

GOLD — Marc Rosset (Switzerland)

SILVER — Jordi Arrese (Spain)

BRONZE — Goran Ivanisevic (Croatia)

Andrei Cherkasov (CIS)

Men’s Doubles

GOLD — Boris Becker and Michael Stich (Germany)

SILVER — Wayne Ferreira and Piet Norval (South Africa)

BRONZE — Goran Ivanisevic and Goran Prpic (Croatia)

Javier Frana and Christian Miniussi (Argentina)

Women’s Singles

GOLD — Jennifer Capriati (United States)

SILVER — Steffi Graf (Germany)

BRONZE — Arantxa Sanchez Vicario (Spain)

Mary Joe Fernandez (United States)

Women’s Doubles

GOLD — Mary Joe Fernandez and Gigi Fernandez (United States)

SILVER — Conchita Martinez and Arantxa Sanchez Vicario (Spain)

BRONZE — Natasha Zvereva and Leila Meshki (CIS)

Rachael McQuillan and Nicole Provis (Australia)

RESULTS

Men’s Singles Gold Medal Match — Marc Rosset (Switzerland) def. Jordi Arrese (Spain), 7-6 (7-2), 6-4, 3-6, 4-6, 8-6.

Men’s Doubles Gold Medal Match — Boris Becker and Michael Stich (Germany) def. Wayne Ferreira and Piet Norval (South Africa), 7-6 (7-5), 4-6, 7-6 (7-5), 6-3

Women’s Singles Gold Medal Match — Jennifer Capriati (United States) def. Steffi Graf (Germany),  3-6, 6-3, 6-4.

Women’s Doubles Gold Medal Match — Mary Joe Fernandez and Gigi Fernandez (United States) def. Conchita Martinez and Arantxa Sanchez Vicario (Spain), 7-5, 2-6, 6-2.

1996 – ATLANTA, GEORGIA, UNITED STATES

MEDALISTS

Men’s Singles

GOLD — Andre Agassi (United States)

SILVER – Sergi Bruguera (Spain)

BRONZE – Leander Paes (India)

Men’s Doubles

GOLD – Mark Woodforde and Todd Woodbridge (Australia)

SILVER – Tim Henman and Neil Broad (Great Britain)

BRONZE – Marc-Kevin Goellner and David Prinosil (Germany)

Women’s Singles

GOLD — Lindsay Davenport (United States)

SILVER – Arantxa Sanchez Vicario (Spain)

BRONZE – Jana Novotna (Czech Republic)

Women’s Doubles

GOLD — Mary Joe Fernandez and Gigi Fernandez (United States)

SILVER – Jana Novotna and Helena Sukova (Czech Republic)

BRONZE – Arantxa Sanchez Vicario and Conchita Martinez (Spain)

RESULTS

Men’s Singles Gold Medal Match – Andre Agassi (United States) def. Sergi Bruguera (Spain), 6-2, 6-3, 6-1.

Men’s Singles Bronze Medal Match – Leander Paes (India) def. Fernando Meligeni (Brazil), 3-6, 6-2, 6-4

Men’s Doubles Gold Medal Match – Mark Woodforde and Todd Woodbridge (Australia) def. Tim Henman and Neil Broad (Great Britain) 6-4, 6-4, 6-2.

Men’s Doubles Bronze Medal Match – Marc-Kevin Goellner and David Prinosil (Germany) def. Paul Haarhuis and Jacco Eltingh (Netherlands), 6-2, 7-5

Women’s Singles Gold Medal Match – Lindsay Davenport (United States) def. Arantxa Sanchez Vicario (Spain), 7-6 (6), 6-2.

Women’s Singles Bronze Medal Match – Jana Novotna (Czech Republic) def. Mary Joe Fernandez (United States), 7-6 (8), 6-4

Women’s Doubles Gold Medal Match — Mary Joe Fernandez and Gigi Fernandez (United States) def. Jana Novona and Helena Sukova (Czech Republic), 7-6 (6), 6-4.

Women’s Doubles Bronze Medal Match – Conchita Martinez and Arantxa Sanchez Vicario (Spain) def. Manon Bollegraf and Brenda Schultz-McCarthy (Netherlands), 6-1, 6-3

2000 – SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA

MEDALISTS

Men’s Singles

GOLD – Yevgeny Kafelnikov (Russia)

SILVER – Tommy Haas (Germany)

BRONZE – Arnaud DiPasquale (France)

Men’s Doubles

GOLD – Sebastien Lareau and Daniel Nestor (Canada)

SILVER – Mark Woodforde and Todd Woodbridge (Australia)

BRONZE – Alex Corretja and Albert Costa (Spain)

Women’s Singles

GOLD — Venus Williams (United States)

SILVER – Elena Dementieva (Russia)

BRONZE – Monica Seles (United States)

Women’s Doubles

GOLD – Venus Williams and Serena Williams (United States)

SILVER – Miriam Oremans and Kristie Boogert (Netherlands)

BRONZE – Els Callens and Dominique Van Roost (Belgium)

RESULTS

Men’s Singles Gold Medal Match – Yevgeny Kafelnikov (Russia) def. Tommy Haas (Germany), 7-6 (4), 3-6, 6-2, 4-6, 6-3.

Men’s Singles Bronze Medal Match – Arnaud DiPasquale (France) def. Roger Federer (Switzerland), 7-6 (5), 6-7 (7), 6-3

Men’s Doubles Gold Medal Match – Daniel Nestor and Sebastien Lareau (Canada) def. Mark Woodforde and Todd Woodbridge (Australia) 5-7, 6-3, 6-4, 7-6 (2)

Men’s Doubles Bronze Medal Match – Alex Corretja and Albert Costa (Spain), def. David Adams and John-Laffnie de Jager (South Africa), 2-6, 6-4, 6-3

Women’s Singles Gold Medal Match – Venus Williams (United States) def. Elena Dementieva (Russia), 6-2, 6-4

Women’s Singles Bronze Medal Match – Monica Seles (United States) def. Jelena Dokic (Australia), 6-1, 6-4

Women’s Doubles Gold Medal Match – Venus Williams and Serena Williams (United States) def. Miriam Oremans and Kristie Boogert (Netherlands) 6-1, 6-1.

Women’s Doubles Bronze Medal Match – Els Callens and Dominique van Roost (Belgium)def. Natalia Zvereva and Olga Barabanschikova (Belarus), 4-6, 6-4, 6-1

2004 – ATHENS, GREECE

MEDALISTS

Men’s Singles

GOLD – Nicolas Massu (Chile)

SILVER – Mardy Fish (United States)

BRONZE – Fernando Gonzalez (Chile)

Men’s Doubles

GOLD – Nicolas Massu and Fernando Gonzalez (Chile)

SILVER – Nicolas Kiefer and Rainer Schuettler (Germany)

BRONZE – Ivan Ljubicic and Mario Ancic (Croatia)

Women’s Singles

GOLD – Justine Henin-Hardenne (Belgium)

SILVER – Amelie Mauresmo (France)

BRONZE – Alicia Molik (Australia)

Women’s Doubles

GOLD – Li Ting and Sun Tiantian (China)

SILVER – Virginia Ruano Pascual and Conchita Martinez (Spain)

BRONZE – Paola Suarez and Patricia Tarabini (Argentina)

RESULTS

Men’s Singles Gold Medal Match – Nicolas Massu (Chile) def. Mardy Fish (United States) 6-3, 3-6, 2-6, 6-3, 6-4

Men’s Singles Bronze Medal Match – Fernando Gonzalez (Chile) def. Taylor Dent (United States), 6-4, 2-6, 16-14

Men’s Doubles Gold Medal Match – Nicolas Massu and Fernando Gonzalez (Chile) def. Nicolas Kiefer and Rainer Schuettler (Germany), 6-2, 4-6, 3-6, 7-6 (7), 6-4

Men’s Doubles Bronze Medal Match – Ivan Ljubicic and Mario Ancic (Croatia) def. Leander Paes and Mahesh Bhupathi (India), 7-6 (5), 4-6, 16-14

Women’s Singles Gold Medal Match – Justine Henin-Hardenne (Belgium) def. Amelie Mauresmo (France), 6-3, 6-3

Women’s Singles Bronze Medal Match – Alicia Molik (Australia) def. Anastasia Myskina (Russia), 6-3, 6-4

Women’s Doubles Gold Medal Match – Li Ting and Sun Tiantian (China) def. Virginia Ruano Pascual and Conchita Martinez (Spain), 6-3, 6-3

Women’s Doubles Bronze Medal Match – Paola Suarez and Patricia Tarabini (Argentina) def. Ai Sugiyama and Shinobu Asagoe (Japan), 6-3, 6-3