almagro

The Spanish Inquisition

James Crabtree is currently in Melbourne Park covering the Australian Open for Tennis Grandstand and is giving you all the scoop directly from the grounds.

By James Crabtree

MELBOURNE –

It is difficult to fathom how hard Nicholas Almagro strikes the ball.

He glares with the eyes of a temperamental bull, but hits with the flowing grace and control of a Matador. An interesting scenario, Almagro uses his racquet as a muleta to tease and finish a pesky ferret.

A method that was proving successful for the first time.

Ferrer has beaten Almagro all twelve times they have played, including 5 losses in finals, a matter that doesn’t sit well with Almagro. “I don’t want to think about that. He is the No. 4 of the world. He is the favourite. He beat me many times, but many matches were close.”

Still, this was only their second meeting at a grand slam, and surprisingly Almagro looked like the player with more experience.

Ferrer was coming up against a player who was in rhythm, a player who controlled the rallies with the crosscourt backhand, then owned it with a backhand down the line.

Only one break of serve separated them in the first and second set, proving how many matches are decided by just a few crucial points.

Still, Ferrer was being rushed and uncharacteristically antagonised, vocalising his disdain and even swiping his racquet down on the court.

Meanwhile Almagro had all but passed the finish line and banked a cheque of $500,000, the guaranteed sum for a grand slam semi-final and $250,000 more than the quarterfinal purse.

Obstinate to the last, Ferrer dug in with Almagro serving for the match two sets to love up and 5-4. Now the tension the favourite had felt was all gone. Subsequently Ferrer edged himself forward on the baseline whilst his opponent attempted to win by pushing the ball.

Suddenly Ferrer was playing his typical game, taking the set and reminding his opponent that he still had to finish the quarter final. Ferrer reflected, “Well, it’s very difficult to win [against]Nico [Almagro], no? I think he played better than me in the first set. There was a break.  I play bad in myself in one break.  In the second, I didn’t play good, no?  In the third, I feel better with my game. I can play more aggressive.”

Ferrer had stolen the momentum that Almagro craved and now everyone expected that the match would go the distance.

Indeed, the fifth set came but only after an unbearably tense fourth set, where again Almagro squandered his chances, twice serving again for the match before losing in the tiebreak. “I think the tiebreak of the fourth set I played very good. And in the fifth, he was cramping, problems with his leg, so it was easier for me,” reflected Ferrer to reporters of his 4-6, 4-6, 7-5, 7-6, 6-2 victory.

Almagro, nursing a suspected injured groin and wearing an incredulous smile ran out of drive, reeling at the opportunity lost.

The two players hugged afterwards, their level of friendship striking after such destructive circumstances, with Ferrer humble of his achievement, “I try to fight every point, every game. I know all the players in important moments we are nervous. I know that. I try to do my best. Today I was close to lost, sure. But finally I come back, no?”

Ferrer progresses to the semi-final where he will face either Novak Djokovic or Tomas Berdych.

MADRID PHOTOGRAPHY FROM GERMANY’S FINEST!

And he keeps sending us stuff! Ralf Reinecke is running around on Madrid and it shows.   Pressconferences and celebrities, noone is safe from his photo camera. And they shouldn’t be.  Ralf’s photography is once again great.

He sent me pics of Melzer, Almagro, Federer, Nadal, Na Li, Andy Murray, Gulbis and as extra bonus shots none other than Cristiano Ronaldo and Paulino Rubio!

Keep ‘em coming and we’ll keep upping them and serve our readers and viewers the best of the best!

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