Alla Kudryavtseva

Get to know surprise US Open semifinalist Angelique Kerber

We’ve reached the final four on the women’s side of the draw at the US Open 2011 and if you’ve being keeping up, you know that there’s a rather unexpected name left on the bottom half. 23 year old German, Angelique Kerber, beat Flavia Pennetta in the quarterfinals to advance to her first career Grand Slam semifinal against Samantha Stosur.

To be perfectly honest, at the start of the tournament, I hadn’t given Angelique Kerber a second thought. Ranked 92 in the world, it seemed unlikely that she would cause any major damage. She played a very winnable first round match against American wildcard Lauren Davis, but then she was expected to bow out quietly to No. 13, Agnieszka Radwanska. Kerber made a few headlines by upsetting Radwanska, but there were several early exits by top seeds and Angelique Kerber once again became a footnote in the US Open story. However, unlike Simona Halep, who upset Li Na, or Alexandra Dulgheru, who took out Petra Kvitova, Kerber continued winning. Granted, she lucked out a bit with the draw, playing Alla Kudryavtseva in the third round, followed by Monica Niculescu in the fourth, before beating three time quarterfinalist Flavia Pennetta.

Angelique Kerber, or Angie as her friends and family call her, was born in West Germany on January 18, 1988. She’s a lefty, who claims that she has no favorite surface, but cites the Australian Open as her favorite Slam and Indian Wells as her favorite tournament. Her highest career ranking came early this year when she reached No. 46 in the world, but she has since fallen to No. 92. She has never won a WTA singles title, but holds 11 ITF titles. Prior to the 2011 US Open, her best performance at any Slam was reaching the third round. In fact, she lost to Laura Robson in the first round of Wimbledon this year.

Kerber joins a growing number of talented young Germans making their mark on the tour, including Andrea Petkovic, Sabine Lisicki, and Julia Goerges. Three of them made it to the round of 16, two to the quarterfinals, and Angie is the last woman standing in the semis. While she is certainly considered the underdog in her next match, she’s on the right half of the draw to pull an upset. Samantha Stosur has only appeared in one final in thirty three Grand Slam appearances. Although Stosur has been playing some spectacular tennis over the last week and a half, Kerber has nothing to lose and everything to gain in this matchup. Plus, she has the element of surprise. When asked to assess her potential match against Kerber, Samantha Stosur responded, “ Well, I don’t actually know much about Kerber except that she’s a lefty.  That’s about it.  We’ve never played and never practiced together or anything like that.  Might be interesting to watch a little bit of that match.” Hopefully Sam at least sent her coach out to watch Flavia and Angelique because with the way things have been going in New York this week, anything could happen.

Estoril Open: Women’s top three seeds ousted, Portuguese hopes dashed!

By Luís Santos

It was yet another hot day at the Estoril Open 2011, but heat wasn’t the only thing that was getting to top seed Alisa Kleybanova. The powerful Russian may have escaped an upset in the previous round but she couldn’t handle the in-form Kristina Barrois.

Just like in the second round against Johansson, consistency wasn’t on the menu for Kleybanova today. Despite securing an early 4-1 lead, she lost nine consecutive games as Barrois kept the error count low. Down 4-6 0-4 it was a mere formality until Barrois claimed the upset 6-4 6-2.

Barrois will now meet Johanna Larsson for a place in Saturday’s final. Larsson was quick to claim the first set from Alla Kudryavtseva but had to rally in the second as the going got tighter eventually prevailing 6-2 7-5.
Said Larsson of her win: “In the beginning of the match I was playing really short in the court, but Alla was making some unforced errors during the game so I was able to get away with it. But then in the second she slowed down a little bit and I had to play more balls, so it was more difficult.”

Of her good form on clay lately, she said : “I always really love to play on clay, but my best results have been on hard court,” said Larsson. “Now it’s changing a little bit! I guess it doesn’t really matter on which surface the results are coming, as long as they are coming!”

And finally, when asked about her recent work with former top player Joachim Johansson she concluded (link to article no1): “The coach that I had (Mattias Arvidsson), his wife has just had a baby, so now I have to find another solution. Pim Pim Johansson was also ending his career at the same time and said he maybe wanted to help me, so we met up before I went here and we practiced for two days, and we’ll also practice when I come back home from this week. We’ll see what happens and take it from there.”

Larsson also talked about her welcoming at the Estoril saying : “It’s my first time here but I played Fed Cup indoors just next door. At that time I really liked it here and this week it’s the same. It’s a really nice tournament – the courts, the organization. The only thing is the security; they don’t let you in everywhere!”

Elsewhere in the draw, Monica Niculescu upset hard-hitting and number two seed Jarmila Gajdosova of Australia. Niculescu staged a comeback of her own rallying from a loss in the first to win 5-7 6-4 6-2. She will now meet Spanish claycourter Anabel Medina Garrigues who ended a dark day for seeds defeating number three seed Klara Zakopalova 6-3 7-5.

Over on the men’s draw, all Portuguese hopes vanquished as both João Sousa and Frederico Gil lost to their respective opponents.

Sousa may have had patches of play that were beyond his ranking but number 5 seed Milos Raonic wasn’t fazed. Despite getting broken while serving for the match and allowing a hold from Sousa, Raonic brought his best strokes to close 6-3 6-3.

As for Frederico Gil, there was nothing he could do in the first set as he got steamrolled by the powerful Fernando Verdasco, losing 6-1.

Verdasco never lost steam as he powered into a 5-1 lead in the second set. Gil, however, wasn’t done. The Portuguese staged a comeback as Verdasco squandered a match point up 5-3 on Gil’s serve. The Portuguese would go up 6-5 but once the Spanish went into the tiebreak he never looked back and sealed the victory 6-1 7-6(5).

Verdasco will now face Kevin Anderson who served his way into the quarterfinals by beating Victor Hanescu 6-4 6-2.

Conclusion of men’s second round matches saw Gilles Simon power past Carlos Berlocq 6-2 6-1 and book a meeting with rising star Milos Raonic.

Women’s semifinals get underway tomorrow while the men will start quarterfinal action.

Estoril Open: Alisa Kleybanova breezes to the next, Portuguese mix up ends in win for Joao Sousa

By Luís Santos
After a dreadful weekend where the rain and wind delayed the qualifying draws it was all sunny  in Lisbon at the Estoril Open, as qualifiers made their way into the main draw and first rounds got underway.

The women of the Estoril Open

On the women’s side, Alisa Kleybanova, top seed at the 2011 Estoril Open women’s event, jumped off to a great start breezing past Olga Govortsova 6-2 6-2 in just 67 minutes.

The Russian was tied 2-2 in the head-to-head record against the Belrussian. But today her superior hitting and serving was too much to handle even for big-hitting Govortsova. Govortsova only managed to win 12 points on Kleybanova’s serve. The top seed now plays french Mathilde Johansson who beat Ksenia Pervak 6-4 6-3.

For 2006 champion Jie Zheng things didn’t go as smoothly, as she ran into Romina Oprandi of Italy. Oprandi is famous for her dropshots and has had good results on clay. The Chinese ended up losing in straight sets by the score of 6-4 6-2. Oprandi now plays Alla Kudryavtseva, who edged Anastasia Rodionova in three sets.

The Chinese contingent was out of luck as Shuai Zhang also went out at the hands of comeback girl Casey Dellacqua. Dellacqua is playing only her first WTA tournament since Wimbledon 2010.

Elsewhere, fifth seed Bethanie Mattek-Sands fell short today at the hands of Romanian Monica Niculescu. Mattek-Sands never let go, however, as she pushed Niculescu into a three-hour and six minute marathon before losing.

Tomorrow, 2007 winner Greta Arn will open her campaign against gutsy Portuguese hope Maria João Koehler. Arn knows how to win in Estoril but will MJK prove too determined for the Hungarian?
Also taking the court tomorrow are Melanie Oudin, recent Fes finalist Simona Halep, fourth seed and defending champion Anastasija Sevastova who opens the tournament against Urszula Radwanska. Klara Zakopalova and Australian Jarmila Gajdosova will also be in action.

The men of the Estoril Open

Over at the men’s side of the tournament, only four main draw matches took place with seventh seed Kevin Anderson proved to be resilient by pulling off a win over flyind dutcman  Thiemo de Bakker 5-7 6-3 6-2.

In an all Portuguese first round match up between João Sousa and Gastão Elias, it was the Sousa prevailing after a tense and at times excellently played match on Centre Court. Sousa drew first blood 7-6 after being a break down with Elias serving for the first set. The Bradenton based Elias regrouped and as Sousa grew increasingly exasperated he capitalized to take the second 6-2. In the third, Sousa jumped to a 4-1 lead and Elias started showing signs of cramping. Elias held for 4-2 and players were tied at deuce on Sousa’s serve when Elias fell to the ground after spanking a forehand. Unable to continue and down on the floor due to cramps he was forced to retire but was walked off the court by Sousa.

Sousa now meets the winner of the match between Milos Raonic and Igor Andreev.

Not so lucky was countrymen Rui Machado. The twenty seven year-old Portuguese, ranked number 102, drew former top 30 player Victor Hanescu and was all out of sorts for most of his encounter with the Romanian as he went out quietly 6-3 6-3.

Over on the last round of men’s qualifying, history was made as Portuguese tennis hope Pedro Sousa qualified for an ATP main draw for the first time in his young career, and at his home tournament nonetheless.

The 488th ranked had already been in the last round of qualifications twice before this year but the third time proved to be a charm as he passed Albert Ramos’ test. Ramos was the top seed and after splitting sets, the Spaniard went up 5-2. When it appeared the more experienced ATP-level player would prevail, Sousa battled back to claim the last five games with an arsenal of scorching winners and classic dropshots. In this stretch of the match, Pedro Sousa allowed a mere five points go the way of the 116th ranked Spaniard.
The Portuguese standout will now play former US Open champion Juan Martin del Potro.

SHARAPOVA DOWN AND OUT (BUT NOT FOR LONG)

By Max Park

As Maria Sharapova left Philippe Chatrier court on Sunday at Roland Garros, it was clear that the former No. 1 was merely a shadow of her former self. Her heroic demise to the Belgian Justine Henin was lauded by the usually hostile and unsupportive Parisian crowd, as they cheered on a former semi-finalist who has largely been plagued by arm and shoulder injuries for the better part of the last two years.

Her match against the former Queen of Clay, Henin, only demonstrated the lack of match play and the erratic serve which has come of late to typify Sharapova. Forehand drives that landed just centimetres outside the lines, the dubious drop shots, the apparent inability to close out decisive points and most crucially, those double faults. One couldn’t help but feel that Sharapova at her peak would have nonchalantly scoffed at these problems. However, the reality is that Sharapova’s inconsistency and lackluster form has only faltered her progress in her comeback trail. Henin was the only top ten calibre player she has had to face this year and the inexperience fully manifested itself.

There is, however, no point in seeing only the negative aspects in a sporting match. Let’s look at the silver linings. Her trademark gritty-streetfighter-me-against-the-world dogged determination and fighting spirit was still intact and was the prime reason for the second set resurgence. What she lacks in technical prowess and precision, she makes up with good old fashioned perseverance and mental fortitude. I have had the ‘pleasure’ to witness another one of Sharapova’s Grand Slam losses, her 2008 Wimbledon second-round defeat against Alla Kudryavtseva. Camping out the night before to get Court No. 1 tickets and then to see your favourite active female player lose against her 154th-ranked compatriot was to say the very least, disheartening. However, what was most admirable about her play over the weekend and during that humiliating Wimbledon loss two years ago was her characteristic fierce intensity, instilled by father Yuri.  She may have played drop shots at the most inopportune moments and even the Court 1 crowd was frustrated with her apparent refusal to add any topspin to her forehand groundstrokes, which time and time again, would hit the top or middle of the net; but that face of utter determination and fierce intensity never subsided.

The mental aspect of Sharapova’s game is what makes her stand out from the plethora of six foot Russian blonde bombshells and what has won her three Grand Slam singles titles. An improved and consistent serve and precise groundstrokes are imperative but it is her mental fortitude and fierce intensity that will ultimately pull Maria Sharapova through in this rather turbulent comeback campaign.

Mondays With Bob Greene: It’s a great honor to reach the number one ranking

STARS

Jelena Jankovic won the Andalucia Tennis Experience by beating Carla Suarez Navarro 6-3 3-6 6-3 in Marbella, Spain

Juan Carlos Ferrero beat Florent Serra 6-4 7-5 to win the Grand Prix Hassan II in Casablanca, Morocco

Lleyton Hewitt defeated Wayne Odesnik 6-2 7-5 to capture the US Men’s Clay Court Championships in Houston, Texas, USA

Caroline Wozniacki beat Aleksandra Wozniak 6-1 6-2 to win The MPS Group Championships in Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida, USA

Rui Machado won the STATUS Athens Open, beating Daniel Munoz-de la Nava 6-3 7-6 (4) in Athens, Greece

Karolina Sprem beat Viktoria Kutuzova 6-1 6-4 to win the Koddaert Ladies Open in Torhout, Belgium

SAYING

“It’s a great honor to reach the number one ranking an
d it is a dream every girl who has ever wanted to play professional tennis shares. It is even extra special for me since my brother Marat was able to reach the number one ranking and I am happy to share this achievement with him.” – Dinara Safina, who took over the WTA Tour’s top spot from Serena Williams.

“This is what all the hard work is for, to play weeks like this and have this kind of feeling at the end. It makes going through the surgery and all the hard work worth it, so it’s good stuff.” – Lleyton Hewitt, who won the US Men’s Clay Championships, his first ATP title in two years.

“I was trying to play my best tennis but the injury prevented me from reaching my top level.” – Serena Williams, after losing to Klara Zakopalova in her first clay-court match of the season in Marbella, Spain.

“This is a great start to the clay-court season, a really good start. I proved I can beat these better players.” – Caroline Wozniacki, after winning the title in Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida.

“I know I have not been playing well the last three months, but this win has given me back the confidence I need.” – Jelena Jankovic, after winning in Marbella, Spain.

“When I hit a good shot she hit a good shot back. I feel pretty good about going 3 and 2 with a top 10 player.” – Fourteen-year-old Madison Keys, after losing to top-seeded Nadia Petrova 6-3 6-2 in Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida.

“I have to say that we were a bit lucky. In the semifinals we were close to losing and today we made it in the match tiebreak. It is my first title and it feels great.” – Lukasz Kubot, who teamed with Oliver Marach to win at Casablanca, Morocco, their first ATP doubles title in their third final together.

“We’re very happy with the first tournament of the clay court season. We are looking forward to going to Europe and we’re going to be over there for 14 weeks. It’s really important to win a title on the clay and getting your balance and a lot of confidence.” – Mike Bryan, after he and his brother Bob won the doubles at Houston, Texas.

“Before every match I try to isolate myself from everybody with my iPod. It’s like a ritual I have before playing and it’s absolutely necessary for me to listen to one of the songs from the ‘Phantom of the Opera.'” – Rafael Nadal, on how he prepares for a match.

“He kind of forces you into that the way he plays defense. It’s no excuse for some errors, especially the ones I made at key times. If you expect to win matches you have to put that around big points.” – James Blake, after losing to Guillermo Canas 6-4 6-4 in a first-round match at the US Men’s Clay Court Championships in Houston, Texas.

“In the tiebreak, it’s anybody’s match.” Sania Mirza, who teamed with Chuang Chia-Jung to win the doubles at Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida, 6-3 4-6 10-7 (match tiebreak).

“Mentally, when you lose 10 points in a row you have to tell yourself it’s going to be OK. That’s not easy. Some people can deal with it better than others, and I’m definitely a guy who struggles with staying calm mentally and just playing my game.” – Tommy Haas, who actually lost 11 straight points yet beat Marcel Granollers in three sets.

“I must be doing something right.” – Lleyton Hewitt, noting his career record on clay going into the US Men’s Clay Court Championships was a quite respectable 80-37. He ended up winning the tournament.

SWISS KNOT

Mr and Mrs Federer

Roger Federer and long-time companion Mirka Vavrinec are now Mr. and Mrs. The two exchanged wedding vows in Federer’s hometown of Basel, Switzerland. They first met at the 2000 Sydney Olympics when both were competing for Switzerland. Vavrinec retired from the Sony Ericsson WTA Tour in 2002. Last month the two announced they are expected their first child later this summer. Federer was full of announcements. After telling of his marriage, he announced he would take a wild card and compete this week in Monte Carlo after earlier saying he planned to skip the event. Federer has reached the final at the last three Monte Carlo tournaments, only to lose each time to Rafael Nadal.

SAFINA ON TOP

Dinara Safina has pulled even with her brother in one respect. She is ranked number one in the world, replacing Serena Williams. The second Russian to be atop the women’s rankings, she is part of the first brother-sister combination to be ranked number one in the world. Her brother, Marat Safin, was ranked number one on the ATP Tour in 2000. Safina is the 19th player to top the women’s rankings. Last year she became the first player to beat three different reigning world number ones in the same season, Justine Henin, Maria Sharapova and Jelena Jankovic. Safina has won four WTA Tour titles in the last 12 months and finished runner-up five times, including Roland Garros last year and the Australian Open in January.

STRUGGLING

After losing two straight matches and her world number one ranking, Serena Williams has withdrawn from this week’s Family Circle Cup in Charleston, South Carolina, citing a left leg injury she originally suffered at the Sony Ericsson Open in Miami. “I need to give my leg injury time to heal,” she said. Williams was the defending Family Circle Cup champion. Williams lost to Victoria Azarenka in the Miami final, then was upset in Marbella, Spain, by Klara Zakopalova in her first clay-court match of the season

STAYING THE COURSE

It’s been a long time for Lleyton Hewitt, but he finally won his first tournament in two years when he stopped Wayne Odesnik 6-2 7-5 at the US Men’s Clay Court Championships in Houston, Texas. With his 498th career match victory, the Australian is just two match wins away from joining Roger Federer and Carlos Moya as the only active players with 500 or more victories. Hewitt, who ranks 35th on the career victories list, failed to win a tournament last year for the first time in his career while recovering from hip surgery. Hewitt won the US Open in 2001 and Wimbledon the following. Ranked number one in the world in 2001, Hewitt went into the Houston tournament ranked number 88.

SUCCESS AT LAST

Jelena Jankovic finally lifted the champion’s trophy this year following a disappointing start to the season. She lost her number one ranking after losing early at the Australian Open. She then dropped her opening matches at Indian Wells, California, and Miami, Florida, two American hard court events. On the red clay in Marbella, Spain, Jankovic finally got things turned around, beating Carla Suarez Navarro in the title match 6-3 3-6 6-3. For Jankovic, who was down a break early in the third set, this was her 10th career singles title, with half of them coming on clay.

STILL IN THE HUNT

Lleyton Hewitt wasn’t the only one to turn back the clock on the ATP Tour. Juan Carlos Ferrero won the Grand Prix Hassan II tournament in Casablanca, Morocco, his first title since capturing the Madrid Masters in October 2003. That was the year he won Roland Garros and lost the US Open final to Andy Roddick. And 2003 was the year Ferrero was ranked number one in the world. It was Ferrero’s first clay court championship since his victorious French Open run in 2003.

STAYING HOME

An inflamed right shoulder is the reason Victoria Azarenka won’t be playing in this week’s Family Circle Cup. In her last match, Azarenka knocked off Serena Williams to win the Sony Ericsson Open in Miami, Florida. Williams went on to lose her next match, then also withdrew from the Family Circle Cup with an injury to her leg. “I am really sorry that I have to withdraw from the Family Circle Cup … due to an injury in my right shoulder,” Azarenka said.  “I was looking forward to returning to Charleston and building on the momentum that I have from the past few weeks.”

SWEPT CLEAN

The US Men’s Clay Court Championships in Houston, Texas, wasn’t pretty for seeded players. James Blake and Mardy Fish were the top two-ranked Americans and the top two seeds in the field. At least for the first round. For the first time since 2000, the top two seeded players in an ATP tournament failed to advance past the opening round. And until his win over Blake, Guillermo Canas had lost six straight first-round matches this year. That was only the beginning. For the first time since the Open Era began in 1968, no seeded players reached the quarterfinals. Guillermo Garcia-Lopez of Spain, ranked 73rd in the world, was the highest-ranked player to make it out of the second round. The eventual winner, Lleyton Hewitt, was ranked 88th when the tournament began.

SENIOR SIGNEES

Goran Ivanisevic and Stefan Edberg are the first two entries for The Masters Tennis event to be played at the Royal Albert Hall in London in December. Six other players yet to be named will join the two Wimbledon champions in the ATP Champions Tour event. At least four of the six to be named will have been either a world number one, Grand Slam singles finalist or a Davis Cup winner in their careers. Ivanisevic played the Royal Albert Hall tournament in 2006, reaching the final, while Edberg played the senior event last year. Ivanisevic missed last year because of a knee injury.

STRENGTH AGAINST STRENGTH

Italy and Russia will battle for the fifth time when they meet in a Fed Cup World Group semifinal April 25-26 in Castellaneta Marina, Italy. The home team has never beaten the Russians in Fed Cup play, losing their last meeting in the 2007 final in Moscow. The last time the two nations met in Italy, in the 2005 quarterfinal, Italy won the first match before losing 4-1. In the last five years, Italy is the only nation other than Russia to win the Fed Cup, defeating Belgium in the 2006 final. That year Belgium eliminated Russia in the first round, the only defeat Russia has suffered in the last five years of the competition.

SWISS CHEESE

There will be a lot of holes in Switzerland’s lineup when it takes on Australia in a Fed Cup World Group II playoff April 25-26 in Victoria, Australia. Missing will be Switzerland’s top two singles players and their captain. Instead, Switzerland will rely on Stefanie Voegele, Nicole Riner and 15-year-old Mateja Kraljevic for the tie, which takes place on grass at the Mildura Lawn Tennis Club. The winning nation will stay in the World Group II for 2010, while the losing nation will drop to zonal competition. Christiane Jolissaint will replace Severin Luthi as captain for this tie. Luthi reportedly will be working with Roger Federer next week.

SIZZLING START

Fourteen-year-old Madison Keys made a successful Sony Ericsson WTA Tour debut by defeating Alla Kudryavtseva of Russia 7-5 6-4 in a first-round match at the MPS Group Championships in Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida. Keys, who lives in Boca Raton, Florida, was given a wild card entry into the tournament. Her only other experience in a professional tournament came at a USD $25,000 USTA Pro Circuit event in Fort Walton Beach, Florida, last month. Keys is currently ranked number 37 in the International Tennis Federation World Junior Rankings. Kudryavtseva is number 81 in the world in the WTA Tour rankings. Unfortunately, her first-round victory advanced Keys to a second-round matchup against top-seeded Nadia Petrova, who beat the youngster 6-3 6-2.

SINO SWITCH

China’s top women players opted to leave the state-run system this year and keep their own prize money. So far, the money hasn’t come rolling in as neither Zheng Jie and long-time partner Yan Zi, nor Li Na and Peng Shuai have registered any notable wins. Each of the four players now has her own coaches, does her own scheduling for practices as well as tournaments, and has her own management team – all things that had been done and paid for by the state system in the past. Now, each player must pay their own expenses, including travel and hotels, out of their earnings. “This is a very difficult time for us because a lot of things have changed. We need time to get use to it,” Zheng said. “I hope we can get back in form as soon as possible.”

SISTERS

Serena and Venus Williams aren’t the only sisters battling it out on the Sony Ericsson WTA Tour. Alona Bondarenko of Ukraine beat her younger sister Kateryna 4-6 6-4 6-3 in the second round of the MPS Group Championships in Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida. Alona, who is two years older, trailed 1-3 in the second set before winning 11 of the last 15 games. “We have different styles, but we know each other well,” Alona said. “I have to play the long points and she doesn’t.” It was their sixth meeting on the WTA Tour – their first match since 2006 – and each has won three times. Polish sisters Agnieszka and Urszula Radwanska are also on the tour, with Urszula beating her older and higher-ranked sister in their lone WTA Tour matchup.

SPONSOR

BNP Paribas has signed a three-year agreement to sponsor both the NEC Wheelchair Tennis Tour and the Invacare World Team Cup. BNP Paribas already is the title sponsor of Davis Cup by BNP Paribas, Fed Cup by BNP Paribas and Junior Davis Cup and Fed Cup by BNP Paribas, as well as other tournaments. The company has supported wheelchair tennis in France since 1993.

STARTING UP

The inaugural International Tennis Federation (ITF) Beach Tennis World Championships will be held May 4-6 at the historic Folo Italico in Rome. The competition will be held alongside the Sony Ericsson WTA Tour event being played in Rome the same week. Beach Tennis merges the disciplines of tennis and beach volleyball into a single sport and is usually played as doubles on a court of similar size to beach volleyball.

SWINGING

Kelly Gunterman is now the director of tennis at Amelia Island Plantation, a site where Andre Agassi, Martina Navratilova, Chris Evert and Martina Hingis have all won tournaments. Gunterman played tennis in college and has trained and taught with John Newcombe and Peter Burwash.

SHARED PERFORMANCES

Casablanca: Lukasz Kubot and Oliver Marach beat Simon Aspelin and Paul Hanley 7-6 (4) 3-6 10-6 (match tiebreak)

Houston: Bob and Mike Bryan beat Jesse Levine and Ryan Sweeting 6-1 6-2

Ponte Vedra Beach: Chuang Chia-Jung and Sania Mirza beat Lisa Raymond and Kveta Peschke 6-3 4-6 10-7 (match tiebreak)

Marbella: Klaudia Jans and Alicja Rosolska beat Anabel Medina Garrigues and Virginia Ruano Pascual 6-3 6-3

Athens: Ramirez Junaid and Philipp Marx beat Jesse Huta Galung and Rui Machado 6-4 6-3

Torhout: Michaella Krajicek and Yanina Wickmayer beat Julia Goerges and Sandra Klemenschits 6-4 6-0

SITES TO SURF

Monte Carlo: http://montecarlo.masters-series.com/1/en/home/default.asp

Charleston: www.familycirclecup.com

Barcelona: www.barcelonaopenbancosabadell.com/

Sofia: www.bgtennis.bg/

Fed Cup: www.fedcup.com

Estonian Tennis Federation: www.tennis.ee/

Polish Tennis Federation: www.pzt.pl/

Belgium Tennis Federation: www.sport.be/fedcup/2009/belcan/fr/

Tennis Australia: www.tennis.com.au/

TOURNAMENTS THIS WEEK

(All money in USD)

ATP

$600,000 Monte Carlo Rolex Masters, Monte Carlo, Monaco, clay

$100,000 Soweto Men’s Open, Johannesburg, South Africa, hard

WTA

$1,000,000 Family Circle Cup, Charleston, South Carolina, USA, clay

$220,000 Barcelona Ladies Open, Barcelona, Spain, clay

TOURNAMENTS NEXT WEEK

ATP

$2,645,000 Barcelona Open Banco Sabadell, Barcelona, Spain, clay

$112,000 Bulgarian Open, Sofia, Bulgaria, clay

FED CUP

(April 25-26)

World Group Semifinals

Italy vs. Russia at Castellaneta Marina, Italy, clay

Czech Republic vs. United States at Brno, Czech Republic, hard

World Group Playoffs

Spain vs. Serbia at Lleida, Spain, clay; France vs. Slovak Republic at Limoges, France, clay; Germany vs. China at Frankfurt, Germany, clay; Argentina vs. Ukraine at Mar Del Plata, Argentina, clay

World Group II Playoffs

Belgium vs. Canada at Hasselt, Belgium, clay; Estonia vs. Israel at Tallinn, Estonia, hard; Poland vs. Japan at Gdynia, Poland, clay; Australia vs. Switzerland at Victoria, Australia, grass