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A Look Back At The Tennis Career of Li Na

Li Na

“Li Na has been a fun, powerful, and wonderful player on the WTA tour and, along with her fans, I am sad to hear that she has retired,” said WTA Chairman & CEO Stacey Allaster on the announcement of the retirement of Li Na, the Chinese tennis trailblazer, winner of the 2014 Australian Open and the 2011 French Open. ”In addition to her amazing tennis abilities and her warm and humorous personality, she is a pioneer who opened doors to tennis for hundreds of millions of people throughout China and Asia.  It’s hard to be a household name in a nation with 1.4 billion people, but that’s what Li Na is.  Thanks to all she has achieved and contributed, her legacy is immense and I have no doubt that her contributions to the WTA will be seen for decades to come in China, throughout Asia and the rest of the world.  I wish her the best of luck in this next chapter in her life.  I will miss her, and I know that while she may be retired from competition, she still will play a big role in the growth of our sport around the world.”

Li Na’s 15-year professional career featured nine WTA singles titles, two doubles titles and saw her become one of the very best and most popular players in the history of women’s tennis.

Li, 32, etched her name in the history books at Roland Garros in 2011 when she became the first Asian player to win a Grand Slam singles title, defeating Top 10 rivals in each of her last four matches. Earlier in 2011 she was the first player from the region to reach a major final, finishing runner-up to Kim Clijsters at the Australian Open. After another run to the final at the Australian Open in 2013, when she was edged by Victoria Azarenka in a dramatic three-setter, Li captured her second Grand Slam title at Melbourne Park in January this year – just the second woman aged over 30 to win the title in the Open Era, after Margaret Court. The victory helped propel Li to World No.2 on February 17, 2014 – the highest ranking ever attained by an Asian player.

Over the course of her career, particularly in later years as her success reached its crescendo, Li’s powerful game delivered against the very best. Her 21 wins over Top 5 opponents included two over reigning World No.1s – Serena Williams at Stuttgart in 2008 and Caroline Wozniacki at the 2011 Australian Open. In total she reached 21 WTA singles finals (going 9-12 in those) and in addition to her wins at the Australian Open and Roland Garros was a semifinalist at the US Open and quarterfinalist at Wimbledon.

Along the way, Li established a string of breakthroughs for Chinese tennis, alongside her Grand Slam title triumphs. She was the first to win a WTA singles title (2004 Guangzhou) and first to win a WTA Premier title (2011 Sydney); first to reach a Grand Slam singles quarterfinal (2006 Wimbledon); first to compete in singles at the WTA Finals (2011-13, finishing runner-up to S.Williams on her most recent appearance); and first to crack the singles Top 20 (August 14, 2006), Top 10 (February 1, 2010) and Top 5 (June 6, 2011). As wfaell as representing her country in Fed Cup competition in eight different years she was a three-time Olympian for China (Sydney 2000, Beijing 2008 and London 2012). She also played countrywoman Zheng Jie in the first All-Chinese WTA singles final at Estoril in 2006 (won by Zheng) and earlier this year won the second All-China final in WTA history at Shenzhen, defeating Peng Shuai for the title.

Li’s career singles win-loss record was 503-188 with prize money earnings of $16,709,074. She exited the game with a rank of No.6.

 

The Best Moments of the 2014 US Open

Marin Cilic

 

The 2014 US Open was known for many surprises. While Serena Williams lived up to her reputation and claimed yet another Grand Slam title, over on the men’s side, Marin Cilic surprised us all by going all the way to the top. At just 25 years old, he managed to beat some of the world’s best recognised tennis stars including Stan Wawrinka and Andy Murray, and has now cemented himself as an up and comer to rival today’s ‘big four.’

Cilic may have surprised us all, but there were a few other golden moments which will not be forgotten in a hurry. Here’s a look back at some of the best moments of the US Open 2014.

 

Kei Nishikori breaks a personal record

While Marin Cilic was raising a few eyebrows and getting bookmakers at www.bettingsports.com talking, Kei Nishikori was another young prodigy to stun at this year’s US Open event. The 24-year-old made it all the way to the final, but while he did not take the title, he did have one extraordinary achievement. After beating Stan Wawrinka, he became the first Japanese player to reach a semi-final since Ichiya Kuamagae in 1918.

 

Andy Murray bows out once again

After his Wimbledon success in 2013, Andy Murray suffered a huge fall from grace this year as he exited Wimbledon early and failed to take the title at the US Open. While some say that he was plagued with back injuries, it could just be that world number one Novak Djokovic was too much for him. The quarter final saw Murray’s sensational exit this year as Djokovic beat him 7-6 (7-1) 6-7 (1-7) 6-2 6-4.

 

Caroline Wozniacki has a bad hair day

Recent break ups with golf champions were the least of Caroline Wozniacki’s worries as she went head to head with Aliaksandra Sasnovich on August 27th. The Danish beauty managed to get her hair caught in her racket during play, making for a memorable photo opportunity for the hundreds of spectators watching her. Thankfully, she managed to progress to the final, but was ultimately overwhelmed when it came to meeting champion Serena Williams.

 

The fall of Roger Federer

It’s becoming more and more likely that the ‘big four’ – Andy Murray, Rafael Nadal, (who was out due to a wrist injury) Roger Federer and Novak Djokovic are soon to be replaced by today’s younger stars. This is particularly true for Roger Federer, who, at 33, was overwhelmed by this year’s champion, Marin Cilic, in the semi finals.

 

Roger Federer Keeps On Keeping On

Roger Federer

by Thaddeus McCarthy

 

Turning 33 earlier this month, Roger Federer passed a milestone. That milestone is that no player has won a Grand Slam at 33 or older since Ken Rosewall won the Australian at 37 in 1972. Andre Agassi won the Australian in 2003 a few months before his 33rd birthday, but other than that there is not a single player who has come within a whisker of emulating Rosewall’s Grand Slam age record. Federer has the chance to come within a four year whisker at the US Open.

Whatever happens for Federer at the US Open, he has had a good year. Perhaps though, the one disappointment he will have, is his record in finals. Before Toronto he has won 3 and lost 5. His win in Cincinnati was his best victory since Wimbledon in 2012, as although he has since won titles, they have not been Masters crowns.

Looking at recent past players Agassi won his final Masters title at the grand old age of 34 in 2004. In fact this title was also at Toronto. So perhaps there is some mystical happenings at work for the older players in Cincinnati. I certainly hope so. And when you consider that Pete Sampras won his final title at the US Open at 31 in 2002, to put some frosty icing on his glorious career, then maybe you could summise that the whole American summer would line up well for Federer. Certainly winning the US Open would be fantastic for Federer’s legacy, and would be a title in a similar ilk to Sampras in 2002.

 

McEnroe, Courier To Compete At Casa de Campo Resort In The Dominican Republic

John McEnroe

John McEnroe and Jim Courier, two of the greatest American tennis champions over the last 40 years, will compete in a special exhibition match on November 7, 2014 at the Casa de Campo resort in La Romana, Dominican Republic to showcase the resort’s tennis offerings.

In addition to their exhibition match, McEnroe and Courier will also participate in special clinics and hitting sessions with patrons and attend a special Casa de Campo tennis cocktail party. Event packages for the clinics, party and exhibition match are for sale and can purchased by emailing res1@ccampo.com.do.

Expertly deemed “Wimbledon of the Caribbean” by Travel + Leisure and “Best Tennis Facility” by USPTR (United States Professional Tennis Registry), Casa de Campo’s La Terraza Tennis Center is an integral component to the Sporting Life experience. The 12-acre facility boasts personal ball boys for every player and 16 fast-dry, Har-Tru courts – 10 of which are lighted for night play.

“Perfectly aligned with the Sporting Life, Casa de Campo is honored to host this international tennis exhibition at La Terraza Tennis Center,” says Peter Bonell, Chief Marketing Officer at the resort. “All guests will have memorable experiences thanks to the resort and club staff, especially the ball boys, who are working tirelessly to make this perfect.”

Known for the Sporting Life, Casa de Campo offers an unmatched array of sport experiences including 90 holes of Pete Dye golf (including Teeth of the Dog, ranked no. 1 in Latin America), Polo & Equestrian Center, La Marina & Yacht Club and a Skeet/Trap Shooting Center. Additional amenities range from fine dining at The Beach Club by Le Cirque and six other resort restaurants, to private beaches, The Casa de Campo Spa, and Altos de Chavon, an artists village with a 5,000-seat Grecian style amphitheater.

Situated among 7,000 acres in La Romana, Casa de Campo is easily accessible through La Romana International Airport operating direct flights from JFK and South Florida, or the nearby major cities — like Punta Cana International Airport and Las Americas International Airport — servicing hundreds of nonstop flights daily from all major U.S. airports.

“Casa de Campo has such a great reputation for being one of the top resorts in the world and I’m looking forward to visiting there for the first time this November,” said Courier. “It’s always challenging and never boring playing a match against John McEnroe and will be fun to do so on the tropical courts at Casa de Campo. Equally challenging will be trying to get some birdies at the Teeth of the Dog golf course, which I am also excited about playing.”

McEnroe is regarded as one of the most talented and well-known players in tennis history.  He won seven major singles titles, including four at the US Open (1979-1981, 1984) in his hometown of New York, in addition to winning 10 other major titles in doubles and mixed doubles. He won Wimbledon three times (1981, 1983-1984), and was involved in perhaps the greatest Wimbledon final of all time, losing to Bjorn Borg in 1980, featuring the famous 18-16 fourth-set tie-breaker. McEnroe helped the United States win the Davis Cup five times and he captured 77 career singles titles and 78 career doubles titles, his last being in San Jose, California in 2006 at the age of 47. Age 55, McEnroe recently won the points title on the 2014 PowerShares Series champions tennis circuit, prompting Courier to label him as the “greatest 55-year-old tennis player to ever grace the earth.”

Courier is regarded as one of the most tenacious tennis players of all time – and with one of the biggest forehands – that led him to a pair of French Open titles in 1991 and 1992 and two Australian Open titles in 1992 and 1993. In 1992, he became the first American to reach the No. 1 ranking on the ATP World Tour since McEnroe in 1985. In 1993, Courier was the youngest player to reach all four major singles finals in a career when he reached the Wimbledon final in 1993 at age 22. He also guided the U.S. to Davis Cup titles in 1992, where he was teammates with McEnroe, Pete Sampras and Andre Agassi on the described U.S. “Dream Team,” and again in 1995. He currently serves as the captain of the U.S. Davis Cup team and competes on the PowerShares Series tennis circuit.

For more information on vacation packages, visit www.casadecampo.com.do

The McEnroe – Courier exhibition is held in conjunction, with InsideOut Sports & Entertainment, the New York City-based independent producer of proprietary events and promotions founded in 2004 by former world No.  1 and Hall of Fame tennis player Jim Courier and former SFX and Clear Channel executive Jon Venison. In 2005, InsideOut launched its signature property, the Champions Series, a collection of tournaments featuring the greatest names in tennis over the age of 30. In addition, InsideOut produces many other successful events including “Legendary Night” exhibitions, charity events and corporate outings. Since inception, InsideOut Sports + Entertainment has have raised over $4 million for charity. For more information, please log on towww.InsideOutSE.com  or www.powersharesseries.com or follow on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.

Novak’s “Djok-hold” on the U.S. Open

Novak Djokovic

By David Cui

 

Following his thrilling Wimbledon victory over Roger Federer to clinch his seventh major singles title and return to the No. 1 ATP World Tour ranking, Novak Djokovic undoubtedly has great momentum going into the upcoming U.S. Open.

Since 2007, Djokovic has been a consistent powerhouse in the U.S. Open, qualifying for the finals in five of the past seven years and winning it all in 2011. Riding on this current streak, which is paired with his Wimbledon victory, a U.S. Open title for Djokovic seems almost imminent.

Furthermore, the U.S. Open is played on a hard surface. Out of his 14 Grand Slam finals and seven wins, Djokovic has played nine of them on hard surface, and won five of those nine. His ratio of Grand Slam titles won to Grand Slam titles played on hard surfaces exceeds that of Federer’s and even that of Nadal’s on clay, demonstrating his dominance among the world’s best players.

Djokovic is also entering the U.S. Open with one more significant advantage over one of his fiercest competitors. For this year’s tournament, many agree that Djokovic’s greatest obstacle will be Federer, who currently possesses the No. 3 ranking.

At first glance, the two appear to have equal chances of beating each other, with a tied record (13-13) on hard courts and an extremely slim overall series (Federer currently leads 18-17). However, upon closer inspection, it becomes clearer that Djokovic will enter the tournament with the upper hand.

In their last ten match-ups, Djokovic holds a 6-4 series lead, as well as a 4-2 lead in their hard court matches. This current trend, along with Djokovic’s most recent victory over Federer at Wimbledon, shows that if the two are pitted against each other in the U.S. Open, Djokovic will likely prevail.

Djokovic has once again risen to the top of the modern tennis world, and if all goes well, will exit the summer of 2014 with not one, but two additional Grand Slam titles to add to his collection.

 

Pro Tennis Right Now Is Boring – Bring On The U.S. Hard Court Season

Cincinnati

By Thaddeus McCarthy

 

The tennis world at this time seems to be quite boring.

Some articles are still coming out concerning Novak Djokovic’s epic win over Federer in the Wimbledon final, which is quite surprising seeing that it was over two weeks ago, an article that recently came out discussed how Boris Becker called Federer the Greatest of All Time (yawn). Another article was out recently concerning how Boris does not call himself a friend of Novak’s. But rather than chattering about supposed coach/player relationships or the monotonous GOAT debate, what I will discuss today is the real business that should concern the tennis world right now, which is the upcoming American hard court swing.

Novak Djokovic has effectively lined himself up as the favourite to have the most successful US Open Series. Nadal is not going away any time soon, and will arguably be more of a threat on hard courts than he was through the short grass season. In terms of points to defend, Nadal has by far the most. There is a lot of doubt though, that he will be able to repeat his effort this year with what he did last year and win the US Open series (Cincinnati, Toronto and US Open). I would not put him as the second favourite this year, just because he has never traditionally performed well in the second half of the season. Last year was an odd occurrence in that respect.

The culprit for the second favouritism position this year could rest with Andy Murray, who has no points to defend and is coming under the radar. His performance at Wimbledon was encouraging after his long down period since his Wimbledon win last year. His strongest surface is perhaps hard courts, which is demonstrated by his 2012 US Open title and 3 Aussie Open final showings. Stan Wawrinka could perform well this summer, but since the Aussie Open has not looked like a Grand Slam winner. Jo Tsonga is another contender, but I think he will only do well enough through a week (or 2) to win one of the American summer tournaments, if any. I have always felt that Jo is the sort of player who is able to play lights out tennis for a period. And he could do this at any time.

The real second favourite though, should be Roger Federer, who has traditionally performed well on the American hard courts and is in resurgence this year. And the fact he lost the Wimbledon final could be good, because unlike in 2012, there will be a feeling this year that he still has something to prove. Last year he was having back problems, and so I think that it is not fair to compare his 2013 with 2014. The level he is playing at is similar to 2012, and the Wimbledon final in particular was reminiscent of Wimbledon 2009.

All things considered, Novak Djokovic should have the best period in the next couple of months. If all players are playing at their best on hard courts, I believe Novak is king. Unlike on clay, where I think Nadal still has the edge. Novak has only the one US Open title and will be hungry to grab another. However, the danger of the young up-and-comers will be more persistent this summer than any other time in recent memory. The showing of Nick Krygios (and Milos Raonic) at Wimbledon is a direct example of this.

But Novak and the rest of the tennis world should never count out Rafael Nadal, as he is the greatest competitor and most tenacious player in tennis history. And will be fighting hard to defend his titles. The field lining up against him is led by Novak, but is flanked by some notable old names and exciting new comers. It will be interesting to see how it pans out.

“The Days of Roger Federer” Book Documents Almost Every Pro Match Played By The Swiss Maestro

The Days of Roger Federer

NEW YORK – “The Days of Roger Federer” – a book that documents matches, life events and facts on tennis legend Roger Federer with unique day-by-day summaries – is now available for sale in hard and electronic formats.

The book is available for $19.95 where books are sold, including here on

Amazon.com: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1937559378/ref=s9_simh_gw_p14_d0_i1?pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_s=center-2&pf_rd_r=10D3VB2K77DG8P0DHHEV&pf_rd_t=101&pf_rd_p=1688200382&pf_rd_i=507846

The book is also available in electronic formats, including on Kindle for $7.99 here:

http://www.amazon.com/Days-Roger-Federer-Randy-Walker-ebook/dp/B00LFQ8BH2/ref=tmm_kin_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&sr=&qid=

The book is published by New Chapter Press and was compiled and written by Randy Walker.

“The Days of Roger Federer” chronicles the trophy-laden career of Federer, one of the world’s most well-known, popular and respected athletes, regarded by many as the greatest tennis player of all time. The book is unique for its day-by-day format: every day of the calendar year is presented with a corresponding anniversary or a bit of fact or trivia, including hallmark victories, statistics, quirky happenings and quotations.

Founded in 1987, New Chapter Press (www.NewChapterMedia.com) is also the publisher of “The Greatest Tennis Matches of All-Time” by Steve Flink, “The Education of a Tennis Player” by Rod Laver with Bud Collins, “Macci Magic: Extracting Greatness From Yourself And Others” by Rick Macci with Jim Martz, “Court Confidential: Inside The World Of Tennis” by Neil Harman, “Roger Federer: Quest for Perfection” by Rene Stauffer (www.RogerFedererBook.com), “Andy Murray, Wimbledon Champion: The Full Extraordinary Story” by Mark Hodgkinson, “The Bud Collins History of Tennis” by Bud Collins, “The Wimbledon Final That Never Was” by Sidney Wood, “Acing Depression: A Tennis Champion’s Toughest Match” by Cliff Richey and Hilaire Richey Kallendorf, “Titanic: The Tennis Story” by Lindsay Gibbs, “Jan Kodes: A Journey To Glory From Behind The Iron Curtain” by Jan Kodes with Peter Kolar, “Tennis Made Easy” by Kelly Gunterman, “On This Day In Tennis History” by Randy Walker (www.TennisHistoryApp.com), “A Player’s Guide To USTA League Tennis” by Tony Serksnis, “A Backhanded Gift” by Marshall Jon Fisher, “Boycott: Stolen Dreams of the 1980 Moscow Olympic Games” by Tom Caraccioli and Jerry Caraccioli (www.Boycott1980.com), “Internet Dating 101: It’s Complicated, But It Doesn’t Have To Be” by Laura Schreffler, “How To Sell Your Screenplay” by Carl Sautter, “Bone Appetit: Gourmet Cooking For Your Dog” by Suzan Anson, “The Rules of Neighborhood Poker According to Hoyle” by Stewart Wolpin among others.

Wimbledon’s Most Controversial Conclusion Explained In Book

"The Wimbledon Final That Never Was"

Wimbledon’s most controversial conclusion from 1931 years ago – as well as fascinating tales featuring some of the greatest Hollywood stars and legends – are featured in the book THE WIMBLEDON FINAL THAT NEVER WAS…AND OTHER TENNIS TALES FROM A BYGONE ERA. The book, published by New Chapter Press, is the posthumously-published memoir of Sidney Wood, the Wimbledon champion from 1931 and member of the International Tennis Hall of Fame.

THE WIMBLEDON FINAL THAT NEVER WAS ($15.95, New Chapter Press, available here on amazon.com: http://amzn.to/m89Ivj details the life and times of Wood with a focus on one of the most unusual episodes ever in sport when he won the men’s singles title at Wimbledon by forfeit. Wood, who passed away in 2009 at the age of 97, tells the story of how he won the title over Frank Shields, his school buddy, doubles partner, roommate and Davis Cup teammate – and the grandfather of actress and model Brooke Shields – when Shields was ordered by the U.S. Tennis Association (USTA) to withdraw from the final to rest his injured knee in preparation for a U.S. Davis Cup match following Wimbledon. He then discusses his “private understanding playoff” that saw his match with Shields at the Queen’s Club tournament final in London three years later 1934 – be played for the Wimbledon trophy.

Wood, who could be called the greatest story teller tennis ever had, also relates fascinating anecdotes and stories that involve some of greatest titans of tennis and such legendary Hollywood personalities as Grace Kelly, Errol Flynn, Charlie Chaplin, Groucho Marx, Gary Cooper among others. Wood also critiques all the best players and all the best strokes for every top player through the years – from Bill Tilden, Rene Lacoste and Don Budge all the way to the modern era of the game.

Wood was born on November 1, 1911 in Black Rock, Conn., and was a long-time resident of New York, N.Y., Southampton, N.Y., and Palm Beach, Fla. When he won the Wimbledon title in 1931 at age 19, he was the youngest man to win the singles title at the All England Club – 17-year-old Boris Becker breaking his record in 1985. He still holds the record of being the youngest player to compete at Wimbledon at age 15 in 1927. He was a singles finalist at the 1935 U.S. Championships and was inducted into the International Tennis Hall of Fame in 1964.

David Wood of Queens, N.Y., the youngest son of Wood, served as a contributor to the volume.

Founded in 1987, New Chapter Press is also the publisher of “The Education of a Tennis Player” by Rod Laver with Bud Collins, “Roger Federer: Quest for Perfection” by Rene Stauffer (www.RogerFedererBook.com), “The Bud Collins History of Tennis” by Bud Collins, “Acing Depression: A Tennis Champion’s Toughest Match” by Cliff Richey and Hilaire Richey Kallendorf (www.CliffRicheyBook.com), “Jan Kodes: A Journey To Glory From Behind The Iron Curtain” by Jan Kodes with Peter Kolar, “Tennis Made Easy” by Kelly Gunterman, “A Player’s Guide To USTA League Tennis” by Tony Serksnis, “Boycott: Stolen Dreams of the 1980 Moscow Olympic Games” by Tom Caraccioli and Jerry Caraccioli (www.Boycott1980.com), “The Lennon Prophecy: A New Examination of the Death Clues of The Beatles” by Joe Niezgoda (www.TheLennonProphecy.com), “Bone Appetit, Gourmet Cooking For Your Dog” by Susan Anson, “How To Sell Your Screenplay” by Carl Sautter, “The Rules of Neighborhood Poker According To Hoyle” by Stewart Wolpin among others.

Can Roger Federer Turn Back the Clock?

Roger Federer

The 2014 Wimbledon Championship is underway and the betting market for the third Grand Slam of the season is proving extremely popular at bookmaker Betfair. Novak Djokovic is the current favourite for the men’s title and the Serb will be looking to go one place better than last year, after being beaten in straights sets by Andy Murray in the 2013 final. Andy Murray got his defence off to a successful start with a comfortable victory on Monday over David Goffin. Rafael Nadal will also be popular with tennis punters at Betfair but his recent record at Wimbledon is patchy to say the least. In one of the biggest shocks in Wimbledon history, Nadal was knocked out in the first round last year and in 2012, only made it to round two. The player who could well be overpriced this year is seven time winner Roger Federer.

Roger Federer first Wimbledon men’s title victory came back in 2003. The Swiss star went on to dominate the sport, especially when it came to the grass courts. Federer took five Wimbledon titles in succession, as well as taking the crown in 2009 and 2012. Following that last win, Federer’s form took a dramatic nose dive and it appeared that the former world number one was coming to the end of a glorious career. Talk of a demise was premature however, and the grass court king has once again shown his class over the last six to twelve months. Roger reached the semi finals at the Australian Open, scoring an impressive win over Andy Murray along the way. Other excellent results have followed and had it not been for taking some time out for the birth of his third and fourth children, Federer may well be ranked even higher coming into this summer’s Wimbledon Championships.

Betfair have put Roger Federer in at 11/2 to claim an unprecedented eighth Wimbledon crown this year and in his current mood, that price is going to make plenty of appeal to punters. The betting on this year’s Wimbledon men’s tournament is dominated by the big four and that has been the case in Grand Slams for a number of years now. Novak Djokovic, Rafael Nadal, Roger Federer and Andy Murray have shared the vast majority of Grand Slam events between them for the best part of a decade and while there are some other players beginning to come through, this trend looks set to continue. Age may well catch up with Roger Federer before too long, but he has proved that he is not a spent force just yet and he’s sure to be all guns blazing going into SW19 this year. There is a huge jump in the market to the next player which is Grigor Dimitrov who can be backed at 16/1. If Roger Federer is going to add to his impressive haul of Wimbledon titles, it will likely need to happen at this year’s tournament and a victory for Fed is sure to hurt the bookies such as Betfair.

A Look Back At The Playing Career of Amelie Mauresmo

Amelie Mauresmo

With much of the Wimbledon hype surrounding Amelie Mauresmo’s coaching role with Andy Murray, we look back at the playing career of the Frenchwoman, courtesy of tennis historian Bud Collins. The following is the bio of Mauresmo from his famous book “The Bud Collins History of Tennis” set for an updated re-release later this year.

 

The only French woman to win Wimbledon other than Suzanne Lenglen (1919–23, 25) and the fifth woman of her nation to win a major, Amelie won two majors in 2006—the Australian over Justin Henin (BEL), 6-1, 2-0, ret. and Wimbledon over Henin, 2-6, 6-3, 6-4. Unseeded, she lost the 1999 Australian final to Martina Hingis (SUI), 6-2, 6-3, defeating No. 1 Lindsay Davenport (USA), 6-4, 6-0 in the semifinals. A superb athlete, well-rounded attacking game, she played Federation Cup 11 years, 1998-99, 2001–09 played 21 ties, posting a 30-9 singles, 2-2 doubles record. She led France to the Cup in 2003, winning two singles in 4-1 final-round win over U.S., including the decisive point, 6-2, 6-1, over Meghann Shaughnessy. In the 2005 Fed Cup final, lost to Russia 3-2, she lost the decisive doubles match with Mary Pierce to Elena Dementieva-Dinara Safina, 6-4, 1-6, 6-3. A member of the French Olympic team in 2000, 2004, she won Olympic silver in women’s singles in 2004, losing to Justine Henin-Hardenne. She was a member of the world’s Top 10 for seven years—No. 10, 1999; No. 9, 2001; No, 6, 2002; No. 4, 2003; No. 2, 2004; No. 3, 2005-06 (briefly No. 1, 2004). She was a quarterfinalist at the Australian Open three times (2002, 04-05), the French Open twice (2003-04) and the US Open four times (2001, 03-04-05). She was a semifinalist at Wimbledon twice (2004-05) and the U.S. Open twice (2002, 06). She was born in St. Germains en Laye, France on July 5, 1979. A right-hander, 5 ft. 9, 152 lbs, she turned pro in 1993 and was the world junior champ in 1996. She won 25 singles titles and three doubles pro titles and $15,022,476 in prize money. She announced her retirement at the end of the 2009 season.

MAJOR TITLES (2)—Australian singles, 2006; Wimbledon singles, 2006.

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