Roland Garros Rewind: Thoughts on Wednesday’s Quarterfinal Action

Now that’s the Jelena I know and love!

A few surprising events unfolded on Wednesday, but all of the favorites ultimately prevailed to set up an elite group of semifinalists.

ATP:

Book it:  The inevitable has happened.  Last year’s finalists, Novak Djokovic and Rafael Nadal, are still the two best clay players in the world, and they will meet in the second semifinal on Friday.  The winner will enter Sunday’s final as a heavy favorite against either David Ferrer or Jo-Wilfred Tsonga:

Welcome back, Rafa:  For much of the first week, the inevitable did not seem very inevitable as Nadal looked a shadow of himself.  In the second week, though, he has lost just 14 games to opponents of a much higher quality than those whom he faced earlier.  Like Serena Williams, Nadal has a knack for pulling himself together when he absolutely must.

0-for-life:  Swiss No. 2 Stanislas Wawrinka has returned to the top ten this year while beating half of the top eight and pushing the rest to the brink of defeat—with one exception.  He never has won a set from Rafael Nadal, a streak that extended to 0-22 today.  To be sure, Wawrinka probably lacked energy after his marathon comeback against Richard Gasquet in the previous round.

What happens in Miami stays in Miami:  Novak Djokovic has spent his last few rounds taking revenge on nemeses of varying recency.  First came Grigor Dimitrov, demolished in the third round after upsetting the Serb in Madrid.  Then Philipp Kohlschreiber bit the red dust four years after defeating Djokovic here.  Third in line was Tommy Haas, who dominated him in a stunningly lopsided victory at Miami this spring.  Haas did manage to force a tiebreak in the second set but otherwise never seriously threatened Djokovic’s progress toward another attempt at revenge.

Question of the day:  Who wins on Friday, and is it really the de facto final?

WTA:

What…was…that?  Now renowned for her clay skills, Maria Sharapova looked very much a cow on ice when she committed 20 unforced errors in the six games of the first set.  She cannot let it happen again against Victoria Azarenka tomorrow.

Classic Maria, and classic JJ:  Sharapova never had won a match after losing a first-set bagel before today, but one can think of no woman more capable of accomplishing the feat.  Losing a match after winning the first set 6-0 also seems a quintessentially Jankovic thing to do, as does double-faulting to lose the first game of the second set in that position.

Rule of three:  Don’t mess with Maria in third sets on clay.  She has lost only one in the last five years, to Justine Henin in 2010, winning nine straight and 16 of 17.  Moreover, only one player outside the top ten has won a third set from her on any surface since 2010.  Once she leveled the match, only one possible ending lay ahead.

Tale of two Marias:  A clear underdog against world No. 3 Victoria Azarenka, Maria Kirilenko battled valiantly through a first set that lasted 76 minutes.  Kirilenko then faded quickly in the second set, but she still deserves credit for reaching her first Roland Garros quarterfinal this year.

Semi-sweet:  With her first Roland Garros semifinal, Azarenka now has reached the semifinals at every major in the last twelve months, something that no other woman can say.  Among the men, only Djokovic has done the same.

Question of the day:  Serena Williams clearly rules the WTA roost, but Azarenka and Sharapova are the heiresses apparent to the throne.  Who comes through to, in all likelihood, face the empress?  Previews of both women’s semifinals will appear later today.